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NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
JO ROCKEFELLFR PLAZA, NFW YORK, N. Y 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor54sponno2 



zine radio and tvl advertisers use 



50< per copy* *8 per year 








Oth 

FALL 
FACTS 



MAJOR ARTICLES 

Key fall trends 35 

All-Media summary 38 

Wildroot's approach 42 

10 top case histories 45 



TV FEATURES 

SPOT SECTION 73 

NETWORK SECTION 117 

TV BASICS 159 

FILM BASICS 183 



The customers' choice ! 

People's tastes vary so widely that radio 
manufacturers offer more than 200 different 
models and colors. No matter what their taste 
in radios. Southern Californians agree on 

ia marked preference for radio. And buy more 
than 266,000 radio sets a year-70% more 
than tv. ( They use them, too. Westerners 

meat. 



spend an average of 17.394 more time with 
their radios than the national average.) 

One other point Southern Californians agree 
on. Having free choice of radio stations to 
listen to, they listen more to KNX—day and 
night, month after month, year after 
year— tliati to any other station. 

LOS ANGELES • 50,000 WATTS JVfN J\. 
Represented by CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 



RADIO FEATURES 



SPOT SECTION 
RADIO BASICS 
NETWORK SECTION 



195 
229 

25 1 



CONVENIENT IN 
to all subjects covered 
appears at front of book 8 




GENERAL BAKING COMPANY do 



ES A COMPLETE JOB 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS . . . 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 







Maximum power — 
100,000 watts at Maximum Height- 
1049 feet 



For nearly half a century, the bakers of BOND BREAD 
have grown steadily in a most competitive field. 
The word "quality" has been a keystone in that 
success . . . quality of product ... of selling . . . 
of service . . . and of advertising. 

In broadcasting, quality in every respect adds up to a 
complete job, too. Top quality programming and 
public service over the Havens and Martin, Inc., 
stations in Richmond deliver sales results throughout 
the rich areas of Virginia. Join the other advertisers 
using WMBC, WCOD and WTVR, the First 
Stations of Virginia. 



WMBG am WCOD m WTVt 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 

Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBC represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 




Fall Facts issue 
hits new records 



CM replaces P&C 
as top spender 



5 network execs 
cite fall trends 



ABC Radio offer: 
4 hours weekly 



Tv radio" set 
to debut soon 



All-Media book 
to be out soon 



Firm 



Total Radio 



1. 


Gen. Motors 


$61.8 


$2.5 


$7.8 


2. 


P&G 


44.0 


14.3 


14.7 


3. 


Colgate 


33.7 


5.6 


11.1 


4. 


Gen. Foods 


29.9 


6.7 


6.4 


5. 


Ford 


29.3 


0.2 


4.3 



SPONSOR'S 8th annual "Fall Facts" issue breaks some records: It's 
first to hit 268 pages, first to inclu de Film Basics (as companion to 
popular Radio Basics, Tv Basics), first to chart complete data on each 
of 6 major rating services and many others. For full scope of this 
fact-filled issue, see index page 8. For summary of hot trends, see 
lead article page 35. 

-SR- 
Here are 10 top advertisers, according to PIB and Bureau of Adver- 
tising figures (newspaper sections included only once): 

Net Net Net Net 

Tv Firm Total Radio Tv 

6. Chrysler $27.3 $0.9 $3.0 

7. Reynolds 18.8 3.2 9.0 

8. Gen. Elect. 18.5 1.5 4.6 

9. Am. Tobacco 18.3 2.4 7.2 
10. Gen. Mills 16.0 4.6 5.5 

Note: Above covers newspapers, magazines and gross network radio and 
tv time only (no spot or talent charges. All fi gures in millions. 

-SR- 
Five network execs discuss fall trends in radio, tv advertising in 
"Sponsor Asks" starting page 56. They are: Bob Kintner, ABC; Adrian 
Murphy, CBS Radio; Ted Bergmann, Du Mont; Tom 0'Neil, Mutual; Pat 
Weaver, NBC. FC&B's Arthur Pardoll, Biow's Dr. Larry Deckinger and 
Katz Agency's Dan Denenholz also contribute. 

-SR- 
Leo Burnett's Art Porter told SPONSOR he doesn't think forthcoming 
NBC, CBS Radio nighttime "rate" cuts will exceed 10% saving to spon- 
sors, won't stimulate interest in nighttime. But others disagree. 
Ollie Treyz, ABC Radio director, intrigued large agency with pitch 
for solid hour 4 nights across board on ABC for about $50,000 weekly 
time and talent (stars). Treyz' reasoning: "Too many advertisers 
have been using a thimble when they should have been using a bucket." 

-SR- 
"Tv radio" nearer than you think. Firm ready to bring fm-am set out 
soon which will receive sound on all tv channels, no picture of 
course, plus regular am stations. This will enable harried housewife 
to follow favorite tv program around house, also permit beach, car 
listening. See editorial page 268. 

-SR- 
SPONSOR's 26-article All-Media Evaluation Study now being reprinted. 
Copies available in August at $4 e a ch . For summary of 26 articles 
and more details of book, see article page 38. 



SPONSOR, Volume 8. No. 14. 12 July 1954. Published biwwkl? by SPONSOR Publics ions In . at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial, Advertising. Cir- 
culation Offices 40 E. 49th St.. New York 17. $8 a year in V. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 39 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act of 3 March 1879 



Id POICI TO SPONSORS lor 12 Julv I !».-» I 



Men behind TvAB 
merger plans 



Summer Hour 
under $25,000 



Wildroot allots 
1 3 to spot radio 



U.S. has 
380 tv stations 



92% of homes 
listen to radio 



Canadian section 
out 23 August 



Credit NARTB President Hal Fellows, Dick Moore of KTTV, Los Angeles, 
W. D. (Dub) Rogers Jr. of KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Tex., for saving adver- 
tisers new headache: 2 Television Advertising Bureaus. Dick Moore's 
TvAB, which barred networks, is merging with NARTB' s bureau. All- 
industry committee meeting in Washington 22 July t o make plans. 
Networks will be represented. 

-SR- 

"Colgate Summer Hour," featuring new talent, reports 3 acts being 
solicited for separate shows of their own. Program over NBC TV costs 
under $25,000, not $70,000 as reported previous issue. Ted Bates, 
Bryan Houston are agencies. 

-SR- 

J. Ward Maurer, Wildroot 's ad director, not only firm believer in 100 
ad budgets (one for each market) but also mathematical wizard as 
well. For how he totted up how much he might have lost had he bet 10c 
a hole doubled at golf — and lost each hole — see Wildroot story page 
4 2 . F irm's spending 1/3 of 55 million-plus budget on spot rad io. 

-SR- 

U.S. tv stations on air, including Honolulu and Alaska, hit 380 as of 
mid-July. Uhf stations continue to go off air. KNUZ-TV, Houston, 
uhf ch. 39, went off 25 June, hopes to return if solution to uhf 
problems is found. WKJF, Pittsburgh, Pa., ch. 53, has suspended 
operations till outcome of Senate committee uhf hearings. Uhf sta- 
tion coming on air recently is WMSL, Decatur, Ala., ch. 23. Three 
vhf's recently on or about to go on are: WISH-TV, ch. 8, Indianapolis; 
KGV0-TV, ch. 13, Missoula, Mont. ; KGE0-TV, ch. 5, Enid, Okla. 

-SR- 

Radio's vigor never better demonstrated than in recent Nielsen report 
showing close to 43 million homes or 92% of all U.S. radio homes 
listened to their sets in typical week (March 7-13). Average listen- 
ing per home came to 20 3 4 hours per week. Report also showed evening 
tv program audiences averaging VA million more homes than last year. 

-SR- 

SPONSOR's 4th annual Canadian section, scheduled for 9 August, has 
been postponed until 23 August issue. It will cover growth of radio, 
tv, list all stations, detail advertising case histories. 



iVeiv notional spot radio and tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Chcscbrough Mfg Co, 

NY 
Duffy-Mott Co, NY 

Monarch Wine Corp, 
Atlanta 

National Biscuit Co, 
NY 

NjuiMtuck Chemical 
Div of US Rubber, 
Naugatuck. Conn 

Pharma-Craft Co, NY 

Pharma-Craft Co. NY 



Vaseline brands 
Clapp's Baby Foods 
Hebrew National 
All prods 



Ar.'mitc, Phygon, 
MH-30.40 



Ting 
Ting 



McCann-Erickson, NY 
Y&R, NY 

Rockmorc Agency, NY 
McCann-Erickson, NY 



Fletcher D Richards. 
NY 



McCann-Erickson, NY 
McCann-Erickson, NY 



47 non-tv mkts 

22 mkts in Eastern, East Cen- 
tral states 
10 Eastern mkts 

10-12 mkts throughout coun- 
try 'additions to current 

tclicd) 

20 Southern, Southwestern mkts 
'keyed to ti of crop growth) 

17 mkts throughout country 

New Orleans. Dayton. Dallas 



Radio: min anncts: 5 Jul; 26 wks 

Radio: dayti min. partic: 21 jun. 28 |un. 

8 Jul; 8 wks 
Radio: dayti, nightti min anncts beg Sep: 

13 wks 
Tv: 2 nightti 20-sec anncts a wk; early 

Jul: 52 wks 

Radio: early-morn min anncts in farm 
progs: 2 Jul- 1 3 Aug; 4-6 wks 

Radio: early-morn, nightti stn-brks: 5 

Jul : 8 wks 
Tv: nightti. preceding baseball 20-sec 

anncts, 5 Jul : 13 wks 



SPONSOR 



One of America's 
Pioneer Radio and 
Television Stations 



GOOD PL 
TO BUY 

Since 



1922 



WGAL • 33rd year 
WGAL-FM- 7th year 
WGAL-TV- 6th year 

Lancaster, Penna. 




Steinman Station 
Clair McCollough, President 



Represented by 



316,000 WATTS 



MEEKER 



New York 
Los Angeles 



Chicago 
San Francisco 



12 JULY 1954 



the magazine radio and tv 



idvertisers use 




Volume 8 Number I 
12 July 1954 



II! 



ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



\\ hut ore the hot radio and tv trends this lull? 

A quick look at the major trends in the field culled from the four main sections 

which comprise SPONSOR'S annual Fall Facts issue »>«* 

Highlights of (fie Iff- Myelin stutlg 

Here is a summary, in capsule form, of each of the 26 articles in SPONSOR'S 
just-completed media study. Study will be available in book form by August »*o 

Why Wildroot has 100 atl budgets 

Wildroot breaks the U.S. into 100 natural product distribution areas, plans each 
market's budget separately. Firm believes this approach avoids waste in spend- 
ing. Firm spends $1.1 million for spot radio •»<• 

10 fop ease histories 

From among the many radio-tv success stones w^ich SPONSOR published last 
year, here are 10 ovtstandinq ones, updated and condensed. These chronicles 
of resultful techniques used by other advertisers may spark ideas for you ~*5 



FALL FACT*.: 1054 (See complete index page S) 

Spot tv report: Availabilities, rates, tv commercials and syndicated films, 

costs, color status at stations, set counts are among topics covered 73 

\ettVork tv report: Up-to-date buying guide covers availabilities on the 

networks, clearance problems, franchises, program and time costs, uhf, color 117 

Tl" Basic*: Latest data in chart form profiling the tv medium today, from 

growth and penetration to programing and audience composition 159 

Him Kaslvs: Facts and figures on the film side of tv; explores status of film 

locally and network, syndication, audience potential of reruns /«>.'» 

.S'po* radio report: Goes into sales trends, availabilities, rates, transcrip- 
tions, special-audience programing, the "hi-fi" boom, other pertinent topics 195 

Radio ttttsU's: Dimensions of radio today in easy-to-read chart form; a 
comprehensive guide to both in-home and out-of-home listening 229 

\ettvorli r«diO report: An examination of network rates, new develop- 
ments in programing, important advertising buys, latest research 25 I 



COMING 



Ire lOI a Ira id? 

More than a dozen advertising agency executives give their reactions to SPON- 
SOR s media study findings about the psychology of fear on the part of adman 2(i •' If f 1/ 

Kotisseries on the air 

How tv helped the rotisserie manufacturers convert their product in the house- 
wife's mind from a luxury to a necessity they cannot do without 2fi •/ It/if 



TIMEBUYERS 

49TH & MADISON 

AGENCY AD LIBS 

P. S. 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Henry A. Morkus J( 

TOP 20 TV FILMS 

TV RESULTS 

SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

AGENCY PROFILE, Stanley A. Loma .' 

NEWSMAKERS 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper 
Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 
Mrtnaqing Editor: M<le< David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alf'f 
Department Editor: Lila Lederman 
Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad. Joe" 
Marks, Keith Trantow 
Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 
Editorial Assistant: Karolyn Rlc 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Co'e 
Vice President and Advertising Dire 
ert P. Mendelson 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. C 
(Western Manager), Homer C 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok [P 
Manager), Ted Pyrch, Ed Higginj 
Vice President-Business Mgr.: it 
Circulation Department: tve'vn Satj I 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morto- 
Kahn, Kathleen Murphy 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shadow 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 






Publlahe.1 bli.ftKIr by SPONSOR PUBLICATI*— 
combined with TV. Eieruiivt. Editorial. CtreaaldJ 
Advertlalng Offlcei: 49th A Madlaoo <«♦ S 
New York 17. N. T Telephone Mlrraj 
Chicago Offlc-i: 161 E. Grand Are Ph "~ M 
7-9863 Dallai Offlce: Inlerurban BulU'lnf. 1M» 
■it Phone: Randolph 7381 Weil Coait Offlf*-* 
let Bouletard. Lo» Angelei. Telephone: Holl»»«J* 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Are . Baltimore 11. III. 
•rrlptlons I'nlted Statei »S a rev. Canada — 
19 Single roplea 50c. Printed In V 8. A. - 
rorretponilenre to 40 E 49th 8t New Tor t 1'^ 
Ml'rraj Hill 8-2772. Copyright 1954. IP0IOM 
LICATIONS INC 



£.1*5 ggfeU ARKANS***' 



-AND SO DOES MARVIN VINES 



OUR FARM-SERVICE DIRECTOR .' 



Some farm-service radio directors try to run a farm de- 
partment, sitting at their desks. 

Not so at KTHS. Marvin Vines, our Farm-Service Direc- 
tor, is out, covering the State, almost as much as he's in 
the studio ! 

In the last twelve months, for example, Marvin Vines has: 

Traveled over 30,000 "business miles", all with- 
in Arkansas. 

Attended 168 meetings, with a total attendance 
of 19,000 persons. 

Conducted personal interviews on 127 farms. 

Appeared as a speaker, panelist or moderator 
on 97 different farm programs. 

Discussed farm problems with 1429 persons on 
his daily and weekly broadcasts. 

ALL THIS, plus broadcasting Id farm programs 
per week, on KTIfS! 

iike Marvin Vines, many of our KT1IS department heads, 
ntertainers, and other ''names" get out and cover the 
>tate, regularly. The result — greater listt wing to KTHS— 
j Ireater values for vou advertisers. 




!0,OOO Wafts . . . CBS Radio 

Represented .by Tbe Branham Co. 
Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. 6. Robertson, General Manager 



KTHS 

» 

BROADCASTING FROM 
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 



<7, 




WINKLING Wl 



:-/-a/-<s / 



s 



FUNNY SUNNY FAf 



EVERY PROGRAM A HALF-HOUR 

OF SIDE-SPLITTING FAMILY 

SITUATION COMEDY 



orce! 



\\ 



LAVISHLY STAGED! 
SPARKLING SCRIPTS! 
SKILLFULLY DIRECTED 



BASED ON CHARA 




Mr. Archer: John Eldridge Mrs. Archer: Mary Brian- Dexfer: Bot 



>?$o?2c*-.^ C .S i ~ 



UGH AFTER LAUGH! 



ATION COMEDY 



HELLO, 

I'M CORLISS.. 
MILLIONS HAVE 
APPLAUDED ME ON RADIO, 
STAGE, IN MOVIES, BOOKS 
AND MA6AZ/NES! NOW 
I'M READY TO 
SELL FOR YOU 

on TV! 



^ 



* 



rite famil 



Y F. HUGH HERBERT 



/ 



^ 






+~s 



/ 



- 



Starring 
ANN BAKER 

Pert, Pretty, Perfect 
for the 



—13J 



1529 MADISON ROAD, CINCINNATI, OHIO 

NEW YORK U/li i'»u/Ann 









9<fo 



(3 



*&S 






^GhJ^L 



'Nq 



8 



// 






By 



TH£ 



got 



SVfo 



£/Vt 



T '°Ks. 



COMPLETE INDEX OF FALL FACTS ISSUE SUBJECTS 



SPOT l\ REPORT 



7» NETWORK RAOIO III i*OHI 251 



( hart of stations equipped for color 7/ 

1 1 (lilabilities for timebnyers 74 

I'v set COUtU 70 

TvAB 7« 

Business outlook HO 

Hate outlook HO 

Color in spot tv H2 

Film commercials HO 

S i(> contract** effect on spot tv l ).'i 

Syndicated tv films 94 

Subscription tv 100 

Farm tv 102 



NETWORK TV REPORT .starts page 117 

i 1 (lilabilities for timebuyers 1 18 

Color tv set aronth chart 120 

(hart of uhf conversion 120 

Problem markets for clearance 122 

( osts for fall 124 

Status of uhf /// 

V umber of color sets by fall / 10 

M umber of color markets by fall 1 IH 

Color programing on networks by fall... 150 

Color costs 130 

Time franchises 7/52 

Tv unions 1 ■~>2 



SPOT RADIO REPORT starts 195 



Availabilities for timebuyers 

\en buying yardsticks 

General outlook for fall 

Program services ... 

U.S. farm market 

iical music 

Folk music 

After-midnight shows 

i-language programing 
Fm radio 
'Hi-fi' 

8 



100 
200 
200 
21 I 
21 H 
220 
220 
221 
221 
22.i 
22.i 



Radio rates for fall 
Kate change effect on network busines 

Guide to net radio rate cards 25 I 

Fall programing news 256 

Programing format changes 256 

Spttt carriers J.~iH 

Cost of participations, segments 258 

Radio research pndtlems 260 

Out-of-home listening measurement 200 

\en research data 200 

Setwork radio advertisers 202 

i Jit II. 1 Sit 'S 

TV BASICS 

/. Dimensions of tv's audience 

II. Television viewing habits 

III. Cost of televisitm advertising 

IV. Television's billings 

* * * 
ITEM BASICS 

/. Extent film is used in television 

II. Reruns of film prttgrams 

III. ivailability of time for film 

IV. Tips on buying film 



RAOIO RASICS 



-tart.- |>.t_. 22H 



/. Dimensions of radio's audience 

II. Radio listening habits 

III. < ost of radio advertising 
l\ . Radio's billings 



SPONSOR 




All these clients on television and/or 
radio are expected back in the sponsors' 
booth this fall. Many of them, in fact, 
continue broadcasts right through the summer. 



American Radiator and 

Standard Sanitary Corp. 
American Safety Razor Corporation 
The American Tobacco Co., Inc. 
Armstrong Cork Company 
Barcalo Manufacturing Co. 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 
Burnham & Morrill Company 
The California Oil Company 
Campbell Soup Company 
Consolidated Edison Co. 
Cream of Wheat Corporation 
Crosley Div. of 

AVCO Manufacturing Corp. 
Curtis Publishing Co. 
De Soto Div., Chrysler Corporation 
Detroit-Michigan Stove Co. 
Doughboy Industries, Inc. 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

& Co. (Inc.) 
Easy Washing Machine Co. 
Ethyl Corporation 
Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank 
Fedders-Quigan Corp. 
The First National Bank of Boston 
Fort Pitt Brewing Company 
E. & J. Gallo Winery 
Gemex Company 
General Baking Company 
General Electric Co. 
General Mills, Inc. 
General Time Corporation 
The B. F. Goodrich Company 
Hamilton Watch Company 
Geo. A. Hormel & Co. 
International Minerals 

& Chemical Corporation 
The Iron Mining Industry 

of Minnesota 
Lever Brothers Company 



Libby, McNeill & Libby 
Maine Sardine Industry 
The Marine Trust Company 

of Western N. Y. 
Minnesota Mining 

& Manufacturing Company 
M • J • B Company 
The Murine Co., Inc. 
The National City Bank of N. Y. 
National Gypsum Company 
Nehi Corporation 
Thomas Nelson & Sons 
New York State Dept. of Commerce 
New York Telephone Company 
Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. 
Northrup King & Co. 
Northwestern Bell 

Telephone Company 
Oneida Ltd. 
The Pacific Telephone 

and Telegraph Co. 
Penick & Ford, Ltd., Inc. 
Pfeiffer's Products Co. 
Polaroid Corporation 
Reader's Digest Ass'n, Inc. 
Rexall Drug Company 
Savings Bank Association 

of Massachusetts 
The F. & M. Schaefer Brewing Co., Inc 




Jacob Schmidt Brewing Co. 
Scudder Food Products, Inc. 
Sea Breeze Laboratories, Inc. 
Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 
The Southern New England 

Telephone Co. 
Standard Oil Co. of Calif. 
R. H. Stearns Company 
Timken Roller Bearing Co. 
Trans World Airlines, Inc. 
Treesweet Products Co. 
United Fruit Company 
United States Steel Corp. 
Vick Chemical Company 
Vitamin Corporation of America 
Western Condensing Co. 
White Sewing Machine Corp. 
Wildroot Company, Inc. 
J. R. Wood & Sons, Inc. 
Wynn Oil Company 
Zenith Radio Corp. 



BBDO 

BATTEN, BARTON, DURSTINE & OSBORN, INC. 











Advertising 






NEW YORK • BOSTON 


BUFFALO 


. 


CHICAGO • 


CLEVELAND • 


PITTSBURGH 


MINNEAPOLIS 


SAN FRANCISCO 


HOLLYWOOD 


• 


LOS ANGELES 


DETROIT • 


DALLAS 


ATLANTA 


12 JULY 1954 












C 



WANT 

BIG 

RESULTS 



in 



Los Angeles 



use 



BIG 



The proof 

"RADIO 



. . KBIC wins TWO 

GETS RESULTS" 



awards of 

Broadcast Advertising 

Bureau, Inc. 

In this year's national annual BAB 
competition, KBIG was the only sta- 
tion in the greater Los Angeles area 
to win, place or show. 
Von's Grocery Co. won Second Place 
in the Food and Grocery Classification 
for "Homemakers' Edition of the 
News." 

J. B. Finch Company won Third Place 
in the Home Furnishings Classification 
for its saturation spot campaigns. 
These national awards honor the sales 
effectiveness of KBIG for two charter 
sponsors whose distribution is confined 
to Los Angeles County. KBIG's 10,000 
watt "salt-water-coverage" on the 740 
kc channel makes it even more result- 
ful for advertisers who want oil South- 
ern California. 



10,000 WATTS 
AT740 



KBIG 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 




GIANT 

ECONOMY 

PACKAGE OF 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

RADIO 



The Catalina Station 
John Poole Broadcasting Co. 

KBID-TV • KBIF • KBIG 
6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

HOIIywood 3-3205 
Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker Asso., Inc. 






Phil BrtiHvh. Ruthrauff & R\an, ffeu York, 
says that .">:.';() to 7:00 pjn. is the most undersold 
period in radio. "Often an advertiser can reach 

muity men for less dollars during that period 

than in early-morning radio." J'hii told sponsor. 
"Beyond that, it's the transition period when men 
are driving home and are susceptible to impulse 

buying. Urine it's a good lime tor soft drink, 
beer or other refreshment buys, not to mention the 
usual produi Is sold along roadsides like gasoline, 
eigareltes or. actually, any male-appeal product." 



.Viiid If inn. Schddeler, Beck & Werner, \ n< 
York, says that the increased radio set sales alone 
are proof of radio's continued growth. "Tv costs are 
still out ol range lor many small advertisers" 
Nina explains. "Radio's low cost-per-lj00O, on the 
other hand, makes it a medium one can't afford to 
overlook. The main firoblem is with the radio 
industry itself, which lends to undersell itself. 
Rate cutting, lor one thing, is doing more harm 
than good, giting the medium a 'bargain-basement' 
atmosphere. We've found daytime radio unbeatable." 



Koger Bumstvatl, media director, David J. 
Mahoney. New York, feds that more constructive 
selling on the part of reps and station men would 
help timebuyers in their work. "Many salesmen 
could give the media people a lot more information 
about their stations and their markets," Roger told 
SPONSOR. " llso. it would help them and the agents- 
men it these salesmen were better informed about 
the products lor which they prepare availability 
lists. A lot of time can be wasted if a rep can't 
correlate an advertiser's needs to his station." 



II iff imii I*. Vvllvnz.. McCann-Erickson, Sen 
)nr/.. says that one oj his most timet unstinting 
problems is getting information on special-group 
radio, especially NegTO and foreign language. "In 
order to convince clients of a special group's value to 
them, a great man\ specific facts are needed, like size 
and characteristics of a station's special audience." 
Hill explains. He suggests that it would be helpful 
lor timebuyers to hate a central source of informa- 
tion on special groups, perhaps one rep to handle 
one spet ial group program tarried on all stations. 



10 



SPONSOR 




ALFRED G. WAACK 
Director of Advertising 
Household Finance Corporation 

Our business in the greater Roches- 
ter market is better than ever be- 
fore in our history. A great deal of 
thanks is due to the effective sell- 
ing of our service by radio station 
WHAM." 



LEI 



WHAM 



RADIO SELL FOR YOU 






The STROMBERG-CARLSON Station, Rochester, N. Y. Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



12 JULY 1954 



11 



'I 




for the 



best in 



HISTEM- 
APPEAL" 

it's 



SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 



KGER 

5,000 WATTS 



Los Angeles * Long Beach 

for 

y» inspirational 

programs 



KOME 

5,000 WATTS 



OKLAHOMA 



Tulsa 

for 

your musical 
Jfi moods 



KUOA 

5,000 WATTS 



Siloam Springs 

for 
it regional 

farm features 

The Stations of the American Home 
Owned and Operated by 



BROWN SCHOOLS, inc. 

John E. Brown, Sf., Pres. 



You can get choice program or spot 

availabilities in these three great market 

areas. Buy all three stations as a package, 

or any one individually. Call or write today. 

Represented nationally by Gill-Perna Inc. 



I\ 



ttlll 

MADISON 



sponsor invite$ letters to the editor. 
Address 40 K. 49 St., New York 17. 



HUCKSTERS 

We liked the hucksters article bv 
Miles I)a\id very much ["Hucksters: 
what you can do about them," 31 Ma\ 
L954, page 27]. It shows what can 
be done about the hucksters in adver- 
tising and how to do it. sponsor is 



to be congratulated for its leader-hip 
in encouraging the advertising fra- 
ternity to make more and better use 
of the facilities available for effecting 
improvement from within. 

I sincerely hope that as a matter of 
policy you will continue to discuss 
abuses in advertising and how to solve 
them through self-regulation. We will 
he vcrv happy to cooperate with you 
in such continuing efforts to promote 
the integritv of advertising. 

Kenneth B. Willson 

President 

National Better Business Bureau 

New York 



PRODUCT ISN'T STOCKED 

The people of kittery appeal to you 
as the guide of the great tv and radio 
industries: 

Hundreds here have a habit of lis- 
tening lo Our Miss Brooks, sponsored 
h\ Colgate. It is a swell program! 
But — when these hundreds go to local 
stores to ask for "Guardol"' (spelling 
not guaranteed — it is not spelled out 
in the commercial i the stores do not 
have it. 

M\ own experience as one wishing 
to preserve the steak-biters I have left, 
is that two groceries and the local 
drug -ion' can provide me with noth- 
ing except "Guardol's" chief competi- 
tor. It's anti-enzyme. So we take that 
ami feel hurt at all that air advertising 
dough going to waste. 

This same situation exists for some 
other products bul we have no definite 
evidence <>n them. 

\\ hat i- the sense "I spending money 
to create a desire to buj something 
\ mi can't gel easily ? 

Hut. at the least, \iiss Brooks makes 
ii- a very < lose and deep friend of 



Colgate. How many other firms are 

creating friends? 

Horai i Mitchell 

Publisher 

The Kitter) Press 

Kittery. \l<\ 



MEDIA BOOK 

We have read an article in the May 
'< Lbs ue of sponsor headlined, "HI. 
Psychology of media: whv admen buy 
what thev do" [page '> 1 . We under- 
stand there were two arti< •!<•- which 
preceded this article. If so, wed ap- 
preciate receiving the previous two. 

With vour permission we would like 
to reproduce the article referred to 
above. This reproduction may take 
the form of a mailing piece. Obvi- 
ou-lv. SPONSOR will be given full credit 
when and if permission is granted us. 

Michael Skmbrat 

Manager Advertising & Prom. 

Putman Publishing Co. 

(,/iieago 

• Material published in SHON-oK mar be re- 
printed pro* i<lo<l |M»I HllaoIlM i* rcque-lrd in writ* 
ins and credit U given. Thi- article i- part of 
the Ml-Medli Serlea. 



Please reserve a copv of sponsor's 
All-Media Study for WITH. 

^ our series is something that ad- 
vertising people have needed for a 
long time. 

|)M K SoMMKKVILl.K 

Program Director 
WTTH and WTTH-FM 
Port Huron. Mich. 



I would like to have reserved for 
me a copy of the volume to be pub- 
lished containing the Mi-Media Eval- 
uation Stud] originally published in 
vour magazine. 

T. J. McDkrmott 
\ . // . i\er & Son 
A ew ) ork 



We would like to place our reserva- 
tion for one copv of vour book, All- 
Media Evaluation Series. We have 
read the articles with a great deal of 
interest and we arc delighted to know 
that you arc putting them into book 
form. 

C. C. Fi i.i.kr 
/ ivc President 
Tuckei 11 <n ne A Co. 

Atlanta 



12 



SPONSOR 



f0U jDW THAT MAN! 

.to BIGGER AUDIENCES 

...to MORE CUSTOMERS 

RALPH BELLAMY 



... a great star bringing realistic, action packed 
adventures that every member of the family will enjoy! 

Now, 82 half hour films available 

• Made expressly for TV 

* Ready for 1st or 2nd run sponsorship in leading markets 




Now-Complete Service for All of Canada: MCA (CANADA) LTD. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA: 111 Richmond Street 
NEW YORK: 598 Madison Avenue, PLaza 9-7500 
BEVERLY HILLS: 

9370 Santa Monica Blvd., CRestview 6-2001 or BRadshaw 2-3211 
ATLANTA: 515 Glenn Building, Lamar 6750 
BOSTON: 45 Newbury Street, COpley 7-5830 
CHICAGO: 430 North Michigan Avenue, DEIaware 7-1100 
CLEVELAND: 1172 Union Commerce Bldg., CHerry 1-6010 



CINCINNATI: 3790 Gardner Avenue, SYcamore 9149 

DALLAS: 2102 North Akard Street, Prospect 7536 

DETROIT: 837 Book Tower, WOodward 2-2640 

SAN FRANCISCO: 105 Montgomery Street, EXbrook 2-8922 

SEATTLE: 715 10th North, Minor 5534 

ROANOKE: 3110 Yardley Drive, NW, ROanoke 2-4857 

NEW ORLEANS: 5405 South Prieur, UNiversity 5104 



mn us for 




Another Channel 10 First, starting July 19th! 



CHANNEL 10 



PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 

Represented by WEED TELEVISION 






Only daily live remote TV show in New England. Emceed by 
charming Nancy Dixon and Peter Careie (piano impressions 
and satire) w ith IM's three-piece combo. All Channel 10's talent 
and celebs visiting Providence will guest. Direct selling to a 
tested women's audience from the area's leading hostelry, 
Monday through Friday, 9:00 to 10:00 a. m. 

Join us for breakfast, sample your products to 100-plus radiantly 
responsive guests in the Sheraton-Biltmore Garden Room. Their 
approbation will register for sure — because 1,120,925 sets in 
area give us 9391 coverage! Availabilities now open — call 
Will) Television. 

NBC - Basic 
ABC — Dumont — Supplementary 



14 



SPONSOR 



I want to say that your current se- 
ries on the various media in the busi- 
ness is slightly more than terrific. I 
have, of course, ordered the complete 
book and assure you that everyone I 
know will have an opportunity to read 
the full text. . . 

Frank Stubbs 
Station Manager 
KLMS, Lincoln, Neb. 

• SPONSOR'S All-Media Evaluation Series will 
be reprinted in hook form next month. Price is 
$4 a copy. You may order now hy writing to 
40 East 49 St., New York 17. 



MERCHANDISING HELP 

In the June 14 "Report to sponsors" 
[page 2] you mention the time buying 
guide we prepared for the franchise 
bottlers of Hires Root Beer. You indi- 
cate that "Stations will welcome idea, 
but may raise eyebrows at some of 
tips . . . free merchandising help. . ." 

Let me point out that the subject 
of free merchandising was the last 
item discussed in the "Guide." The 
first and most important considera- 
tion is, of course, how to establish a 
good advertising schedule. 

However, many stations do offer 
merchandising help, and the best way 
to get this "extra" help is to ask for 
it. Exactly how much merchandising 
and the form it should take is a sub- 
ject for negotiation between buyer and 
seller. 

Although it does not replace good 
advertising schedules, it is interesting 
to note the different stations' reactions 
to requests for merchandising. Some 
feel it is a necessary evil — the price 
you pay to get the schedule; others 
use it as a sales tool. We like the 
latter approach! 

Dirk A. Watson 
N. W. Ajer & Son 
Philadelphia 



RADIO/TV DIRECTORY 

Would you please send me one copy 
of your 1954 "Radio/Tv Directory"? 
G. H. Mathisen 
Advertising Dept. 
Colgate-Palmolive Intl. 
Jersey City 



We keep a running file in our sales 
office on all sponsor stories, and think 
they are terrific. I would appreciate 
your sending me several additional 



copies of the new 1954-'55 Radio/Tv 
Directory. 

Fred L. Bernsti i\ 

General Manager 

WTTM 

Trenton 



Please, please, please send us three 
copies of the latest directory. I have 
used last year's until it is ragged and 
worn. 

Eleanor Bolenbaugh 
WTOP-AM-FM-TV 
Washington, D. C. 



Thank you for the handy Radio/Tv 
Directory which we received this 
morning. 

I was somewhat disturbed to note 
that the Unity Television Corp. listing 
indicates a wrong telephone number. 
The correct number is LOngacre 
4-8234. I would appreciate it if you 
will make a personal note to correct 
this in your next issue. 

Len Firestone 
Sales Manager 
Unity Tv Corp. 
New York 

• SPONSOR'S 1954 Radio/Tv Directory is avail- 
able free of charge to subscribers. 



TV PIONEERS CHART 

I saw a copy of the bulletin board 
copy of the tv chart that appeared in 
the May 17 issue of sponsor ["TV 
PIONEERS," page 59]. It is indeed 
very interesting and informative. I 
would appreciate it very much if you 
would send me a couple or so copies. 

J. W. Collins 

Manager 

WAGA-TV, Atlanta 

• Extra copies of the "TV PIONEERS" growth 
chart are available on request. 



SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT 

I have been meaning to write before 
now to say thanks for the splendid 
story that sponsor ran on the subject 
of WNBC-WNBT's "Sunday Supple- 
ment" concept ["New way to buy local 
radio-tv: as a Sunday supplement," 31 
May 1954, page 38]. We are very 
gratified for the attention the idea re- 
ceived from your magazine as well as 
the broadcasting and advertising trade 
press in general. Joan Marks did a 
fine job in writing the story. 

Equally important in my opinion as 





Newest Southeast 
Kansas — Northeast 
Oklahoma survey 
covering 1 1 
county Coffeyville 
trade area (256,000 
people I reports: 

KGGF HAS BIG- 
GEST AUDIENCE 
IN 45 OUT OF 52 
MONDAY THRU 
FRIDAY i/ 4 HOUR 
STRIPS! (6:00 
A.M. to 6:30 P.M.I 

KGGF with 10 
KW on 690 KC 
delivers primary 
coverage to a total 
of 87 counties in 
Kansas, Oklahoma, 
Missouri and 
Arkansas. 





WEED & CO., National Representatives. 



J 



MILLION Population! 



Fabulous Houston has grown from the frontier town of 
yesteryear to the mightiest giant of the South! On July 3rd, 
metropolitan Houston population reached the million mark. 
One million people, representing well over $1,195,425,000 
in retail sales* with an effective buying income of over $6,298 per 
family.* One million, working, buying, energetic people who 
represent the largest metropolitan market of the Soutl 



Sales Management 
Survey of Buying Power 
May 10, 1954 





KCOH 

1430 

George W. Clark, Inc. 

KNUZ 

1230 

Forjoe & Company, Inc. 

KPRC 

950 

Edward Petry 
& Company, Inc. 

KTHT 

790 

H-R Representatives, Inc. 

KTRH 

740 

John Blair & Company 

KXYZ 

1320 

Free & Peters, Inc. 

KYOK 

1590 

John E. Pearson Company 




KJEO-TV 

FRESNO, calif. 



S«rw«« an 



EXCLUSIVE 
UHF MARKET 



ALL stations in the Fresno Trade Area 
are UHF stations. Los Angeles and San 
Francisco cannot possibly get into this 
area. The flat Valley topography, sur- 
rounded by mountains, and the 4400 
ft. height of the KJEO transmitter 
gives UHF every natural advantage. 



CHANNEL! 

ABC-TV AFFILIATE* 

GREATER Coverage 

SUPERIOR Reception 

Powerful new 12 KW transmitter 
now in operation with E R P of 

444,000 WATTS 

Covers ALL Central California's 
rich BILLION dollar market. 

123,354 sets 
July 1954 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

THE BRANHAM COMPANY 

Offices In leading Cities 



O'NEILL BROADCASTING CO. 

FRESNO.' CALIFORNIA 

P. O. Box 1708 Phone 7-8405 

J. E. O'Neill. President 




the < ommen ial su< i ess "I the idea was 
the favorable response we ^<>i not onlj 
from tin- clients who bought it hut 
from man) agencies and businessmen 
who wanted to Bee if the idea could be 
made applicable to theii < Lients or 
products. We are bo encouraged thai 
our second supplement was held the 
weekend of June 18 on the subject of 
domestic tra\el and again there are 
already encouraging -ales si^ns. A 
group of Tan Vmerican countries have 
come to ii- to explore the possibility 
of doing a supplement on vacation and 
travel in their areas. 

I think SPONSOR can rest assured 
that in keeping with its editorial pol- 
icy you have performed another serv- 
ice to the industr) 1>\ bringing the de- 
tails of a fresh new idea to the atten- 
tion of \our readers. 

Hamilton Shea 

General Manager 
WNBC-WNBT 
New York 



SPONSOR INDEXES 

Did sponsor publish an index prior 
to 1953? We have the indexes for the 
first and second half of 1953. \\ e have 
also saved practically all of the spon- 
sor magazines since you started pub- 
lishing, and this collection would he 
more useful if we had an index of the 
earliei issues, (dancing through copies 
for a couple of years prior to 1953. 1 
could not find where an index was in- 
cluded. Perhaps you published those 
separately. 

Frank S. Proctor 

Manager 

WTJS 

Jackson, Tenn. 

e SPONSOB publishes Indexes to ii~ srtieles 
semi-annually, in January and July. The Index 
for ill.- fir-t ~i\ months of l u 5» « ill appear in 
the next Issue, 2<> July. SPONSOR has been 
publishing the*.- Indexes since I'MT. 



NEGRO ISSUES 

Will Mm please -end us five copies 
of \oiir first annual Negro Section if 
still available. In addition, if you have 
am reprints on an} articles concerning 
V gro radio, please -end five copies. 

John M. M< Li pcdon 
Indianola, Wiss. 

O SPONSOR'S lliiril annual N.urn Section will 

be out 2i> September 195*. Bach Israel bob* 
lainint: previous Me sju sections ar<- in short sup- 
ply, However. il»e 19B4 Pr9grmm Coaste devotes 

an e«lir lion lo Negro railio an<l is aiailalile 

free lo subscribers. K.xira eopios, $2 earh. 

i Please turn i<> page 2o."> > 




AN 



opmdoM 

to the Nation's 
Test Market! 

WLBC-TV 



Muncie . . . sometimes called Mid- 
dletown, U.S.A. . . . has been the 
nation's recognized test market for 
years. Reach this rich Muncie area 
market via WLBC-TV. 

* 70,000 UHF sets 

V»T 65% tuned to Channel 49 

■^T $200 Base Rate 

y{ All 4 networks 

7»T Proven Test Market 




CHANNEL 

49 



MUNCIE, INDIANA 



Houston hits a 

MILLION! 



flh .: 



i 



uup 




. 41 .. 

1111 Hi II 






Metropolitan Houston reached the million population mark 
on July 3rd. This fabulous industrial giant of the Gulf Coast, 
representing a net effective buying income of $1,856,123,000.00, 
becomes the first million population metropolitan area in the South. 
Tremendous expansion of the city itself barely keeps pace with the 
ever-increasing demands of industry. A million strong today, with 
the promise of an eminently greater future, Houston proudly claims 
the slogan of "Industrial Frontier of the South." 

KPRC is FIRST 

KRPC radio and television remains FIRST in the hearts of 
the metropolitan million. First in morning . . . afternoon . . . 
evening . . . first all the time. 



NBC and TQN 
on the Gulf Coast 



JACK HARRIS, Vice President and General Manager 



I 



NBC • ABC 
CHANNEL 2 



Nationally Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



first in the Booth's FIRST MILLION MtTROPOLITAN MARKET! 



12 JULY 1954 



NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N, Y 



19 



Getting 
Attention 
Where it 




Popularity is determined by how 

many listen. In San Diego, more people 

listen to KSDO than any other 

station, according to HOOPER. 

Whatever it is, you can sell it faster, 

for fewer dollars-per-sale on 

San Diego's FIRST station . . . KSDO. 

May we show you why KSDO 

gets more attention than 

any other station? 





by Bob Foreman 

Although thi> is the Fall Facts issue of SPONSOR, the 
following epic delves into a fact that is with us without regard 
to season. Since fall, however, i- the beginning of the big 
tituc if- a- good a season a- any to launch this subject 

The testimonial has long been considered one of adland's 
liig guns, as well it should. For this approach to selling has 
the same basic appeal a- the over-the-fence conversation, the 
telephone-tip, the friend-to-friend suggestion. In addition to 
these virtues, advertising has brought the appeal of emulation 
to the testimonial technique so that the beautj secrets of 
movie stars, the vigor of shot-putters and the -kills of racing 
drivers are imparted through testimonial advertisements — 
to name just a few r of the vicarious virtues available. 

Now along comes television and makes these ad\ ice-givei s, 
whether of the star variety or the common garden genus, 
appear in person utilizing their voice and their visage and 
perhaps perform a few seconds ot their specialty which could 
be anything from kissing Robert Tax lor to driving a car 
through fire. Then come- the sell. 

As usual, television places added burden- on the advertising 
folk- I meaning everyone from copywriter to film directori. 
since tv always tend- to expose the phoney in short order. 

The gi\er of the testimonial ha- to know what he or -he i- 
talking about — and. more important, ha- to appear to or 
the total elled i-. instead of convincing, detrimental to the 
product. 

Main are the campaigns, it turn- out. that cannot stand 
this new onus. In other wind-, what make- t\ a- great a- it 
i-. i- al-o it- greatest handicap. \\ hen you mi--, you mi-- l>\ 
the proverbial country mile. 

\\ hat the al ove woidage lead- me to is the broader aspects 
of the pom l\ conceived testimonial campaign the aftermath 
of phoniness created on and in television. The harm done 
i- not niereK to the product for which the cop) was designed 
but to a more or less degree for the entire medium of 
television, then in turn for all advertising. The degree is 
i Please turn to page o_> | 



20 



SPONSOR 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA 



(AND WESTERN NEVADA) 




DELIVERS MORE FOR THE MOMEV 



These five inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you 
more listeners than any competitive combination of local 
stations . . . and in Inland California more listeners than the 
2 leading San Francisco stations and the 3 leading Los Angeles 
stations combined . . . and at the lowest cost per thousand! 
(SAMS and SR&D) 

Ringed by mountains, this self-contained inland market is 
90 miles from San Francisco and 113 miles from Los Angeles. 
The Beeline taps a net effective buying income of almost 4 
billion dollars. 
(Sales Management's 1953 Copyrighted Survey) 



WCIXTCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 
12 JULY 1954 




__/0 RENO 
KFBK ° SACRAMENTO 

KWG O STOCKTON 

r \ 

KMJ ° FRESNO 



KERN 




21 



the outstaying 
Adapted jrom ^ 0j J 




starring HUuH IVIAKLOWt with Florenz Ames as Inspector Qi 



Y-^-7 



tpa 

sales 

builder 





Here's a new TV show that's as reassuring as money in the hank ... a first-run series 
that's backed by a 25-year habit of success. 

A SUCCESS IN EVERY MASS MEDIUM 

In print ... on the screen ... on the air— "Ellery Queen" has consistently spelled "box-office". 
On TV live— on a handful of Du Mont-cleared stations— "Ellery Queen" demonstrated an amazing 
ability to dominate its period, without any "inheritance" . . . against any competition. 
Now, specially filmed for TV . . . starring the man who created the radio role, "Ellery Queen" 
is marked for new highs. 

A TREMENDOUS READY-MADE AUDIENCE 

The readers who made "Ellery Queen" a 30,000,000-copy best-seller ... the movie goers . . . 
the former listeners and viewers— these are the people who give this new series a ready made, 
multi-million audience. Marlowe fans who have enjoyed his work on stage and screen 
("Voice of the Turtle" . . . "Twelve O'Clock High" and many others) will swell the figure. 
And top production— all down the line— will win and hold new viewers for this series. 

A SHOW THAT CANT MISS 

To the proved commercial impact of mystery shows, "The Adventures of Ellery Queen" 

adds the power of a great name . . . the prestige of fine dramatic programming. Call, write or wire 

for the full story, and for franchises in areas where you need a show that can't miss. 



'elevision J&rograms of tMmerica, inc 

77 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, N. Y. • 1041 N. FORMOSA AVENUE, HOLLYWOOD 40, CALIF 




THE CLOVERLEAF 
STATION 



SALINAS 



MONTEREY 



SANTA CRUZ 



WATSONVILLE 



. ■.'."> 





FAST 
GROWING 
MARKETS 



SERVING 

300,000 

LISTENERS 



5000 

WATT 




SALINAS 

CALIFORNIA 



REPRESENTED BY WEED & CO. 




\<»ir developments on SPONSOR stories 

S«'**: "Foreign-language radio: 19.>.'i" 

Issue: 2(» Jannarj 1953 

Subject: New Spanish-language tv alum on 

\\ OR- T\ appeal* to large market 

New York's 847,000 Spanish-speaking people might be called 
America's ninth largest market: the group not onlj tops Boston, hut 
also is growing at the rate of 1,135 Spanish-speaking people weekly, 
according to the Mayor's Committee on Puerto Rican Vffairs. 

\\()|{-'l\. New York, is seeking to cash in on the market with a 
weekl) hour-long Spanish Hour. Station reports it i- booked solid 
with advertisers, and that there's a waiting list for fall. 

According to a special Pulse survej done for the station, Spanish 
Hour ha~ a 27.5 rating among ihe Spanish-speaking population — the 
No. 1 show among the Puerto Rican group at thai time ' Monday, 
10:00-ll:()0i: it is seen in half the Spanish-speaking home- where 
tv sets are in use; it tops the next closest program h\ 141%; reaches 
170 families in every 100 Spanish-speaking home- watching the 
program: is viewed h\ 389 viewers per ion sets; has a circulation 
exceeding that of two Spanish-language newspaper-. 

The program features visiting celebrities of the Latin American 
world. Five-minute film < -lips of current Spanish-language movies 
when shown drew such a large response that Azteca Films 'one of 
the worlds largest producers of Spanish-language films) bought a 
quarter-hour segment of the program. Other quarter-hour sponsors 
include Gustone Vitamins. Busch Jewelry Stores and Colony Motor-. 
Albert Ehlers (for Cafe Carihe coffee I has just finished a 13-week 
cycle, will hiatus for the summer and return again next fall. 

The program draws about 7.000 pieces of mail weekly, of which 
about 2-V ; is written in English. 

Ten out of the 273 tv stations responding to SPONSOR'S Program 
Guide questionnaire reported Spanish-language programing. The 
Program Guide, just published, lists specialized programing bj 
1,568 radio and 273 tv stations. The tv stations reporting special- 
ized programing for the Spanish-speaking population of the L.S. are 
general lv located in the Far West and Southwest. * * * 

S,«m; '"What you should know about film 

service firms'" 

ISSIIC: 8 February 1954. page IS 

Slllljt'C't; Service- available to film -v ndicatnr-. 
tv stations 

T\ executives were surprised recentl) when a plan was announced 
for saving them, rather than costing them money. 

According to the Bonded Film Storage Co.. the tv industrx could 
save at least 20' i of the cost of transporting film — if it were all 
shipped from a "pool" maintained in central film "warehouses bj 
Bonded Film Storage. 

I nder the Bonded plan, the shippers would take advantage of 
lower freight rates due to increased weight shipped. 

For example, a reel of film weighing five pound- costs a- much 
to ship as 10 reels weighing 50 pounds. However, film distributer-, 
network-, agencies and stations don't have time to wait around until 
the) gel a big shipment of film— all to be shipped to just one 
destination. Therefore, the) have to ship in -mallei and more 
expensive) lots. 

Bonded would also service the film (clean, inspect, repair). 

Chester M. Ross, president of Bonded, said the plan for consoli- 
dated film shipment- would save at least $1 million of the more than 
$5 million -pent annuall) for t\ film transportation. * * * 




24 



SPONSOR 



M 

The Land of Milk and Honey is Not a Test Market! 




12 JULY 1954 



25 



WAITING 

FOR YOUR SHIP 



m 



10 COME IN 



You won't have to wait very long in 
Cleveland — for this inland port (along 
with all its other bustling activity) 
set a new all-time record for itself 
last year in volume of dry, bulk 
freight moved. During 1953, the Great 
Lakes fleet carried almost 200 million 
net tons — and over 80 r '< of its 286 
vessels call Cleveland home. 

The movement of Cleveland-made 
goods to the rest of the world is 
matched in magnitude only by 
the influx of goods Clevelanders 
want to buy. (How competent they 
are to do this is reflected by 
their 1953 banking balance of 
$33,387,000,000.) 

Industrial action is the mounting 
keynote in the Cleveland area, 
geared to America's industrial 
progress. And the one TV station 
that's really geared to Cleveland's 
thoughts and tastes is WXEL. It 
follows that the shortest route 
between two points (i.e., Cleveland 
pocketbooks and your advertising) 
is via the television station iden- 
tifying itself most closely with 
this remarkable market. As other 
advertisers are happily finding, 
your ship comes in every day when 
you sign aboard WXEL. Ask the 
KATZ agency for details. 

Cleveland 

WXEL 

Channel 8 




New and renew 



' SNISII 



12 JULY 1954 



1. 



Oleic on Television Networks 



2. 



SPONSOR 



Borden Co, (Instant Cof- 
fee), NY 

Brown & Williamson Tob 
(Viceroy), Louisville, Ky 

Campbell Soup Co, Cam- 
den, N) 

Chrysler Corp, Detr 

Chun King Sales, Inc, 
Duluth, Minn 

Doeskin Prods, NY 

Firestone Tire & Rubber 
Co, Akron, 

Florida Citrus Comm, 
Lakeland, Fla 

Ceneral Mills, Mpls 

Dorothy Cray Cosmetics, 

NY 
Creen Giant Co, LeSueur, 

Minn 
Hawaiian Pineapple Co 

(Dole), SF 
Int'l Shoe Co, St. Louis 

Int'l Shoe Co, St. Louis 

Johnson & Johnson, New 

Brunswick, NJ 
Lehn & Fink, NY 

Liggett & Myers (Ches- 
terfield), NY 
Minute Maid Corp, NY 

John Oster Mfg Racine, 

Wis 
Pharmaceuticals, Newark 

Pharmaceuticals, Newark 
Pillsbury Mills, Mpls 

Procter & Gamble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble (Tide), 

Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble 

(Cheer), Cinci 
Reardon Co (Dramex), St 

Louis 
R. J. Reynolds Tob, 

Winston-Salem, NC 
R. J. Reynolds Tob, 

Winston-Salem, NC 
Serutan Co, Newark 
SOS. Co, Chi 

A. E. Staley Mfg Co, 

Decatur, III 
C. A. Swanson, Omaha 

Toni Co, Chi 

Toni Co, Chi 

Toni Co, Chi 

Toni Co, Chi 

Toni Co, Chi 
W'lider Co, Chi 



AGENCY 



CCSS, NY 

Ted Bates, NY 

BBDO, NY 

McCann-Erickson, Detr 
JWT, Chi 

Crey Adv, NY 

Sweeney & James, Cleve 

JWT, NY 

Tatham-Laird, Chi 

Lennen & Newell, NY 

Leo Burnett Co, Chi 

N. W. Ayer, SF 

Henri, Hurst & MacDon- 

ald, Chi 
D'Arcy, St Louis 

Y&R, NY 

Lennen & Newell, NY 

C&W, NY 

Ted Bates, NY 

Henri, Hurst & MacDon- 

ald, Chi 
Edward Kletter, NY 

Edward Kletter, NY 
Leo Burnett, Chi 

Benton & Bowles, NY 
Benton & Bowles, NY 

Compton, NY 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- Sam- 
ple, Chi 
Y&R, NY 

Krupnick & Assoc, St 

Louis 
Wm. Esty, NY 

Wm. Esty, NY 

inward Kletter, NY 
M-Cann-Erickson, SF 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi 

Ta;ham-Laird, Chi 

Leo Burnett, Chi 

'-co Burnett, Chi 

Loo Burnett, Chi 

Weiss & Celler, Chi 

W-ss & Celler, Chi 
Ta!hcr- L^ird, Chi 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



CBS TV 69 Carry Moore Show; F 11-11:15 am scg; 9 July; 

52 wks 
CBS TV 86 Viceroy Star Theatre; F 10-10:30 pm; eft 2 July 

CBS TV Lassie; Sun 7-7:30 pm; eff 12 Sept 

CBS TV 70 Title TBA; Th 8:30-9 pm; 30 Sep; 52 wks 

CBS TV 70 Carry Moore Show; alt Th 10:15-10:30 am seg; 

eff 15 July; 52 wks 
CBS TV 45 Robert Q. Lewis; M 2-2:15 pm; 13 Sept; 39 wks 

ABC TV Voice of Firestone; M 8:30-9 pm; 14 June; 52 

wks; simulcast 
ABC TV Twenty Questions; T 8:30-9 pm; 6 July; 52 wks 

CBS TV 60 Captain Midnight; alt Sat 11-11:30 am; 4 Sep; 

52 alt wks 
ABC TV Ray Bolger Show; joint sponsor F 8:30-9 pm; 17 

Sept; no. wks not set 
NBC TV Mickey Rooney Show; alt Sat 8-8:30 pm; 28 Aug; 

no. wks not available 
CBS TV 46 House Party; F 2:45-3 pm seg; 30 July; 52 wks 

NBC TV Howdy Doody; alt F 5:45-6 pm; 6 Aug; 7 telecasts 

NBC TV Ding Dong School; alt T 10:15-30 am seg; eff 

28 Sept 
NBC TV 76 Imogene Coca Show; partic sponsor Sat 9-9:30 pm; 

2 Oct; 39 wks 
ABC TV Ray Bolger Show; joint sponsor F 8:30-9 pm; eff 

17 Sept 
CBS TV 73 Tv's Top Tunes; M, W, F 7:45-8 pm; 28 June; 

summer repl Perry Como; 8 wks 
ABC TV 51 Super Circus; Sun 5:30-6 pm scg; incr from alt 

wk to every wk; eff 27 June 
NBC TV 49 Today; partic sponsor M-F 7-9 am; 28 Sept; 15 

partic 
CBS TV 66 Juvenile Jury; T 8:30-9 pm; 22 June; summer 

repl for Red Skelton 
CBS TV 86 Two in Love; Sat 10:30-11 pm; 19 June; 52 wk- 

NBC TV Mickey Rooney Show; alt Sat 8-8:30 pm; 28 Aug; 

no. wks not available 
CBS TV 122 On Your Account; M-F 4:30-5 pm; 5 July; 52 wks 

NBC TV Concerning Miss Marlowe; M-F alt das 3:45-4 

pm; 5 July; 52 wks 
CBS TV 67 The Seeking Heart; M-F 1:15-1:30 pm; 5 July; 

52 wks 
CBS TV 89 Welcome Travelers; M-F 1:30-2 pm; 5 July; 52 

NBC TV Golden Windows; M-F alt das 3:15-3:30 pm; 5 

July; 52 wks 
NBC TV 49 Today; partic sponsor M-F 7-9 am; 8 Sept; 14 

partic 
NBC TV The Hunter; Sun 10:30-11 pm; eff II July 

CBS TV 32 Morning Show; T-F 7:45-50 am; alt das; 1 June; 

31 wks 
Du Mont 51 The Stranger; F 9-9:30 pm; 25 June; 13 wks 

CBS TV 56 Bob Crosby Show; alt F 3:30-45 pm seg; 9 July; 

52 alt wks 
ABC TV Don McNeill's Breakfast Club; T, Th 9:30-9:45 

am seg; 27 July; 52 wks 
CBS TV 67 Bob Crosby Show; alt Th 3:30-3:45 pm seg; 5 

Aug; 56 wks 
NBC TV College of Musical Knowledge; Sun 7-7:30 pm; 

4 July; 11 wks 
CBS TV 57 Carry Moore Show; alt Th 10:15-10:30 am seg; 

eff 8 July; 52 wks 
NBC TV People are Funny; alt Sun 7-7:30 pm; eff 19 

Sept 
CBS TV 48 Bob Crosby Show; T 3:30-3:45 pm seg; 15 June: 

52 wks 
N'BC TV Dollar a Second: Sun 10-10:30 pm; eff 4 July 

CBS TV 60 Caotain Midnight; alt Sat 11-11:30 am; 4 Sept; 

52 alt wks 



fteiieu-erf «n Teferi.vioii Networks 



SPONSOR 



Brown Shoe Co, St Louis 

Cokite-P-'Imolive, Jersey 

City, N) 
Continental B3king, NY 
Ceneral Mills, Mpls 

Ceneral Moto-s, Frigidaire 

Div, Det oit 
Hotpoint Co, Chi 



AGENCY 



Leo Burnett, Chi 

Wm. Esty, NY 

Ted Bates, NY 
Wm. Esty, NY 

FC&B, Chi 

Maxon, Chi 



STATIONS 



ABC TV 60 

CBS TV 116 

NBC TV 35 
CBS TV 71 

CBS TV 52 

ABC TV 67 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Smilin' Ed's Cang; Sat 10:30-11 am; 21 Aug; 52 

Strike It Rich; W 9-9:30 pm; 7 July; 52 wks 

Howdy Doody: W 5:30-6 pm; 9 June; 52 wks 
Barker Bill's Cartoons; W, F 5-5:15 pm; 2 June; 

52 wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; T, Th 10:30-45 am; 8 

June: 52 wks 
Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet; alt F 8-8:30 pm; 

2 July: 52 wks 







\ umbers liter names 
refer to Aew and Re- 
new category 

. If. Finley(3) 
Rodney- Erickson (3) 
H. D. Talbot Jr. (4) 
E. H. Weitzen (4) 
E. Gelsthorpe '4) 



12 JULY 1954 



27 



2 JULY 1954 



\«'ii ami renew 



2, 



Renewed on Television Networks (continued) 



SPONSOR 



Int'l Srivcr, Mcridcn. Conn 

Kellogg Co. Battle Creek. 

Mich 
Nestle Co. White Plains. 

NY 
Pillsbury Mills. Mpls 

Pillsbury Mills, Mpls 
Plymouth Div. Chrysler 

Corp, Detroit 
Ralston Purina, St Louis 
Revere Copper & Brass, 

NY 
Simmons Co, NY 



AGENCY 



Y&R. NY 
Leo Burnett, Chi 
Cecil & Prcsbrey. NY 
Leo Burnett. Chi 

Leo Burnett, Chi 

N W. Aver. NY 

Gardner, St Louis 

St. Ccorgc & Keycs NY 

Y&R. NY 






STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



CBS TV 56 My Favorite Husband; alt Sat 9:30-10 pm; | 

Sept. 22 alt wks 
NBC TV 48 Howdy Doody: T & Th 5:30-5:45 pm; I June J 

ABC TV 53 Space Patrol; alt Sat 11-11:30 am; 4 Sept; 52 

CBS TV 51 Arthur Codfrcy Time; M-Th 11 15-30 ami 

June; 52 wks 
CBS TV 50 House Party; M-Th 2:45-3 pm; 1 June; 52 wl 

CBS TV 139 That's My Boy; Sat 10-10:30 pm; 10 |uly; 13 , 

ABC TV 53 Soacc Patrol; alt Sat 11-11:30 am: 4 Sept; 52 

NBC TV 22 Meet the Press; alt Sun 6-6:30 pm; 11 July j 

pgms 
CBS TV 56 My Favorite Husband; alt Sat 9:30-10 pm I 

Sept, 22 alt wks 



'See page 2 tor New National Spot Radio and Tv Business i 








28 



4. 



5 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME I FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



C. Ralph Bennett 

Barry Blau 

Albert R. Bochroch 

Douglas K. Burch 

Christopher Cross 
Harold H. Dobbcrtecn 
Rodney Erickson 
Ceorge M. Finley 
Ted Cravenson 
Mary Harris 
Sander Heyman 

Kingsley F. Horton 
Howard S. Johnson 
Russ Johnston 
Franklin P. Jones 
Edward J. Labs, Jr. 
William W. Lewis 
Phillip L. McHugh 
Joseph C. Meehan 
William S. Oliver 
Roger Purdon 
Daniel Welch 
Granville Worrell 



Fred Gardner Co. NY, partner & creative dir 

Huber Hoge & Sons. NY, media dir 

Gray & Rogers. Phila, contact dept & in chg new 

bus 
Benton & Bowles. NY. asst tech dir tv. assoc 

redg dir radio 
K&E, NY. asst publicity dir 
Foote, Cone & Bclding, NY, vp & dir media 
Y&R, NY, mgr acct planning 
Bryan Houston, Inc. acct exec 
Ben Sackheim Co. NY 
Free lance r-tv dir, prod, writer 
Schenley Ind, LA, adv & sis 

CBS. Pacitic Coast, sis mgr 

C&W, NY, dir pub rels r-tv 

Ward Wheelock. Phila, in chg r-tv 

Gray & Rogers, Phila, publicity dir 

Allied Bdctg Co, Syracuse, genl mgr 

Geyer, NY, comml dir 

Tracy-Locke Co, Dallas, r-tv dir 

Geyer Adv, NY, pr acct exec 

Ayes, Swanson & Assoc, Lincoln, acct exec 

Wm Weintraub, NY, copy chief 

Foote, Cone & Bclding, Chi, acct exec 

Cray & Rogers, Phila, contact dept 



Same, exec vp 

Emil Mogul Co. NY, traveling r-tv time buyer 

Same, vp 

Stockton. West, Burkhart, Inc. Cinci, mgr of • 

progrmg 
Same, dir exploitation div prom dept 
Bryan Houston, Inc, NY, vp & dir media 
Same, vp 

Same, vp & acct supvr 
Wexton Co. NY. vp & chmn plans bd 
McCann-Enckson. NY. prodn supvr 
Roy S. Durstinc. Inc. LA, exec staff, head | 

r-tv activities 
McCann-Enckson, NY, r-tv acct exec 
Same, vp 

McCann-Enckson. NY, acct exec 
Same, vp 

Flack Adv. Syracuse, acct exec 
Same, dir r-tv 

Campbell-Ewald. Detroit, r-tv dir. 
Same, dir pub rcl dept 
Curt Freiberger & Co, Denver, acct exec 
Bryan Houston. NY. vp & creative dir 
Necdham. Louis & Brorby, Chi. acct exec 
Same, vp 






Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


Charles Derrick 


Pepsi-Cola, NY, display mgr 


Edward Gelsthorpe 


Bristol-Myers, NY, dir specialty sis. new prods 




devel dept 


Robert M. Lehman 


Du.inc Jones. NY, mdsg mgr 


Norman V. Osborn 


Ward Wheelock Co, Phila, mgr plans-media dept 


Harold D. Talbot Jr. 


B. F. Goodrich. Watcrtown. Mass., sis prom mgr 




floor covrg div 


Edward H. Weitzen 


Bulova Research & Devel. Labs, NY, prcs & dir 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, adv mgr 
Same, dir sis prom. 






prods div 



American Safety Razor Corp, NY, asst mdsg - 
Thomas Lipton. Inc. Hoboken, media dir 
Sylvania Elcc, Salem, Mass, adv mgr. lighting I 

American Machine & Foundry. NY. vp in chg n 



/Veto Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 



ABC's Western Film Synd. Hywd. new address. 1539 North 

Vine St, Hywd 28 
Fred W. Amend Co, Chi. new sales office. 1603 Orrington Ave, 

Evanslon. Ill 
Amer Merchandising Org, Phila. new radio-tv prize supplier. 

2038 Pine St. Phila 
BMI, new exec office address. 589 Fifth Ave, NY, PLaza 

9-1500 
Campbell-Ewald. NY. new addicss, 488 Madison Mu 8-3400 
Ettinger Co, Hywd, new address, 8120 Sunset Blvd 
Ccneral Adv Agency, new agency. Markham Bldg. 1651 Cosmo 

St. Hywd; owner John M. Kemp 
Mel Cold Prodns, new NY film prodn co at 1639 Broadway. 

Mel Gold, prcs, formerly head of N^t'l Screen Service, East 

Coast div 



William W. Harvey Co. new offices at 5747 Melrose A. 
Headley-Reed, new New Orleans office. 504 Delta I 

Baronne St 
KB.F, Fiesno, new address. KBID-TV blag. 1117 "N" Si 
Lew King Adv. Phoenix, becomes Lew King Prodn* 

P'odn sc.-v avail for radio & tv 
McCann-Erickson, NY absorbs Wilkinson. Schiwctz & 1 

Hnus'on agency 
McCow.-n Prodns. LA. new telefilm prod firm, add' 

Studios, La Brca Ave. LA 
Official Films, new West Coast offices. 275 So Bcverlt 

Beverly Hills. Cal 
Pelican Films, new co at 41 W. 47 St. NY. formed by Thoi 

J. Dunford. Jack Zander & Elliott Biker 
William G Rambeau Co. Chi, new offices at 185 N 

Ave. Chi 1 



Numbers utter names 
refer to Neu and Re- 
neu category 

II v Johnson 
Douglas t\. Ilur, hi I) 
Roget Purdon (3) 
// illiam E. I ewis (3) 
//. //. DobberteenO) 

Granville U orreli > S » 
t. R. Bochroch 

I hi n 1. 1 in I'. Jones (3) 
Ted (rim enson (3) 
/ / Labs Jr. (3) 




SPONSOR 






Buy mr H \J 
and get Iowa's 

METROPOLITAN Al 
LUS the 
mainder of low 



S.A.M. DAYTIME 
STATION 
AUDIENCE AREA 




NEBRASKA 



Iowa has six Metropolitan Areas which, all 
combined, do 32.8*^ of the State's Retail Sales, 
as shown at the right. 



iiiifliiiiap 

saaa 1 "'aciaag 

iqbejbbhbh^- 

B 

MISSOURI *•• 






Quite a number of radio stations can give you 
high Hoopers etc., in ONE Metropolitan Area. 
WHO gives you high coverage in virtually 
ALL the State's Metropolitan Areas, plus prac- 
tically all the REMAINDER of Iowa, too! 



RETAIL SALES PERCENTAGES 

5.4% Cedar Rapids • 

4.2% Tri-Cities • 

11.4% Des Moines 

2.9% Dubuque • 

4.6% Sioux City 

4.3% Waterloo • 

32.8% TOTAL METRO. AREAS | 

67.2% REMAINDER OF STATE | 
100.0% 

(1954 Consumer Markets figure*) 



At 9 a.m., WHO gives you 
74,526 Actual Listening Homes 
for only $47.50 



(15.7 LISTENING HOMES per PENNY!) 



According to the authoritative 1953 Iowa Radio- 
Television Audience Survey, 74,526 homes all over 
Iowa are actually tuned to WHO at 9 a.m., every aver- 
age weekday. Figuring time costs at our 1 -minute, 
26-time rate, WHO gives you 15.7 actual listening 
homes, per penny! 

That's the result of ALL-STATE programming, ALL- 
STATE Public Service, ALL-STATE thinking, here at 
WHO. Ask Free & Peters for all details ! 



FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



BUY ALL of IOWA- 
Pius "Iowa Plus"-with 




Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



12 JULY 1954 



29 




CFCF SELLS 'EM!* 

In 1953, 278 individual 
local accounts got sales 
results from CFCF. 

"you can't fool a cash 
register. 




MONTREAL 

INU.S-WEED 
IN CANADA-AIL CANADA 







Milton Berle, Henry Markus and Jan Murray discuss mock money problems 



Henry A. Markus 

Vice President 
Wir.e Corp. of America, Chicago 

It all started late one afternoon in 1947 when Henry A. Markus, 
v.p of the Wine Corp. of America, walked into the storage room 
and drained 40,000 gallons of wine into the Chicago sewers. This 
decision helped double the firms sales within a year. 

The reason? Pouring 40,000 gallons of Barloma wine down the 
drain made room for Mogen David wine. This kosher wine with mass 
appeal has gotten all the firm's advertising backing from 1947 on. 

"On a sales trip in Peoria I met a jobber who wouldn't buy any 
Barloma," Markus explained to SPONSOR. "He did want 50 cases of 
Mogen David — and 50 cases is a lot of wine! Our sales records 
showed Barloma just holding its own while Mogen David sales 
were climbing. 

"The answer was obvious — promote Mogen David. But we didn't 
have enough room for Mogen David, so I got rid of Barloma."' 

Markus also applies his marketing and sale- experience in guiding 
the advertising strategy of the wine firm. The bulk of this adver- 
tising, through Weiss & Geller, is in tv. Here's how Mogen David 
Wine's $1,986,000 budget for 1954 breaks down: $1,238,000 for tv: 
S448,000, billboards; $300,000. newspapers, radio, spectaculars. 

During the past year Mogen David sponsored Dollar A Second, 
Du Mont, Mondays 8:00-8:30 p.m. over 93 stations. This show cost 
the sponsor $10,500 a week to produce. An audience-participation 
quiz program, it was m.c.'d by Jan Murray. For the 1954-1955 
season show will move to VBC TV, with a 130-station lineup. 

Mogen Davids network t\ advertising is aimed at a mass family 
audience. The firm switched from sponsorship of dramatic pro- 
graming in 1952 when it dropped Charlie Wild. Detective. 

"Ours is an ideal family wine," Markus told SPONSOR. "Therefore 
we like to reach the famiU when it is gathered in group entertain- 
ment before a tv set. And we prefer to reach them with light 
entertainment rather than heavj or disturbing dramatic shows." 

This formula has paid off: For the first six-month period of 1954 
sales are up 30' over '53. And if sales ever slip? 

Markus grins at this question: "We have another wine formula 
with even better consumer tests than Mogen David. Now if we 
only had the space. . ." * * * 



EQ 



SPONSOR 



-.-•■ 



5 M OOTH QJL 



Set your course on Channel 2 for 
the rich Midwest market, and just lean back and relax! 
You'll breeze in first when you speed sales 
with all the full power impact of 

WJBK-TV 




'Way out in front with 
100,000 watt power, new 1,057 foot tower, 
top CBS, Dumont and local programs. 




■^rcz^*- • 



l3*«*^. : 



t-;-)^ 




**&5* 



'.»---- 



^ V 


/«* " iff. 


P*^ 


4 - • - » 








-*& 


^K' - ■?- ^-^^Wfll 


^gjgcg 





epresenfed Nationally 
Y THE KATZ AGENCY 




National Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 118 E. 57th, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-7690 




The product cost — of all things 
— S 1 00- The advertiser wanted 
leads. First MUTUAL broadcast 
rolled in .1,300 and in — hold 
tight- US weeks. 46,000! 
Man had to advertise for 
extra salesmen. 




Sure we've an audience lift (even listening at night is up on Mutual over last year 

in the latest Nielsen report— M-F 7:30-10 pm.) Sure we've a billing gain (the only network 

to have one in fact— Jan. -April '54 over Jan. -April '53). Sure we lift our voice 

in 328 markets other nets and other media miss. That's the great strength of Mister Plus. 

But the lift that counts, we think, is the lift Mister Plus gives clients' sales. 

Want a lift, Mister? 



Mutual Broadcasting System 



A Service of General Teleradio for All- America ...PL US 




w 



STORM COMINC" BY CLYDE BFOIM 



|trL (^niiinJunZitLEA. 



ITH a promising Fall Season, thousands 

of farm families are ready to turn to the adver- 
tiser . . . for the products their well-earned 
money will buy. 

How can the advertiser most effectively send 
his sales message directly to the working families 
in the Midwest? Naturally, through the media 
that has helped build this market by serving its 
people. That media is . . . WLS! It has given 
these working families the kind of entertain- 
ment, news, markets and other services that 
have won their complete confidence and loyalty. 

Yes, it's time for the advertiser to reap the 
harvest that awaits him when he concentrates 



his sales message in the Midwest 
powerful selling of WLS! 



through the 




CHICAGO 71 

890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY. 



34 



SPONSOR 



12 JULY 1954 






HAL FELLOWS, NARTB PRES., SOUGHT MERGER WITH TVAB R. A. MOORE, KTTV, ACTING CHAIRMAN OF "OLD" TVAB 



ISIetC facts for sponsors: Advertisers will get increased flow 
of facts about tv soon. Industry should have Television Advertising 
Bureau before summer's out which will furnish facts about tv as part 
of its promotional function. New TvAB will be result of merger be- 
tween TvAB, which stations had organized, and planned tv promotion 



bureau of NARTB. Pictures above are of two of industry's leaders 
who helped bring about merger: NARTB President Harold Fellows 
and Dick Moore, KTTV, of station-organized TvAB. Also in offing 
for advertisers is official count of tv sets in all U.S. markets by 
NARTB's planned Television Audit Circulation. (See page 76) 



The 20 trends yon must 
know about in fall radio-tv 

Here from the pages of SPONSOR'S 8th annual Fall Facts issue 
is your over-all look at this fall's hottest trends 



I his is the eighth in sponsor's series of Fall Facts is- 
sues. It is also the largest issue in sponsor's history, hav- 
ing 268 pages. To help give you the over-all picture quick- 
ly, sponsor's editors have prepared the brief report which 
appears on the next two pages. Its paragraphs are high- 
lights from the complete coverage which follows later in 
this issue. This issue's function is to help you make im- 
mediate buying decisions and to serve for the year-round 
as a manual. It is divided into seven main sections: re- 
ports on spot tv and network tv, on spot radio and net- 
work radio; and three Basics sections, one on radio, one 
on tv and one on film. The Basics give you fundamental 
industry facts, many of them in chart form. 

12 JULY 1954 



■'.--/ 



You'll find complete index 
for this issue on page 8 



In addition to usual Digest Page appearing 
with each issue of sponsor, this issue has com- 
plete subject index to its seven main sections. 
You'll find it helpful in looking for subjects 
you are most concerned with. See page 8. 



- - 



35 




Color tV is starting growth on local as well as national 
level. Above, one of WKY-TV, Oklahoma City's live color shows. 
For color coverage this issue sse Spot tv starting page 73 and Net- 
work tv starting page 117. Results of SPONSOR survey of U.S. tv 



stations and their color equipment appear page 76. Shown above 
(I. to r.): Bob Doty, WKY-TV production supervisor; Prissy Thomas 
who does announcements for client, Club Cracker; Milt Stephan, 
Allen & Reynolds; Leonard Fox, Oklahoma sales mgr, for client 



SPOT TV TRENDS 

■ '■■ r , r> j'urt starts pagt '■'■ 



1. Stations are gearing up for color telecasting, 

special SPONSOR postcard survej of all I .S. outlet show-. 
More than seven out of ever) l<> outlet? hope to have 
equipment to televise color shows From network lines he- 
fore the end of the year. About 20', expert to install 
color slide and film equipment for local-level telecasts. 
\im the problem rests with equipment makers. Adver- 
tisers are expected t<> move in on color spot t\ "experi- 
mentally early tin- coming fall. 

2. Official industry tv set count may soon be on 
the way. Politz research firm has been retained b\ 
\ \l!Tli to stud) methods "I counting t\ sets in I .S., cir- 
culation of t\ stations. Uso the station-formed T\ \H will 
become all-industr) promotion bureau to distribute facts 
and figures of television to advertiser-. 

.'i. Heavy pressure is still on from advertisers 

seeking nighttime spot slots. Reps report that night- 
time turnover of advertisers in largest markets is often 
less than l'». Result: Man) advertisers are moving in on 

afternoon and morning slots rather than sweat out the 

long "priorit) lists. 

/. Tv film industry is booming. Willi network 
costs at all-time high, man) advertisers are using multi- 
market campaigns built around syndicated 61m programs. 
Somi 25 I -I today's syndicated \idpi\ business is in 
tin- field. In film commercials, trend is toward more 
animation and Eewei non-extra actors, larger per-filra 
budgets and smallei numbers of film commercials, leading 
prodw '-I- report. 



N ETWOR K TV TRENDS 

I <•'. [( n port starts pagt 1 IT 



/. The SRO signs at nigHl are up earlier for this 
fall than in previous seasons. Nighttime availabilities on 
CBS and NBC are non-existent. \BC and Du Mont have 
time available, though former i- filling up it- evening pe- 
riods nicely. 

2. Clearances uill he easier this fall than last 
though it is hard to generalize about this complicated 
subject. There are -till a number of problem area- and 
there is no relief in sight in a few of them. The agent ies 
-till have men traveling around the countr) trying to clear 
time for specific show-. 

3. Costs will he up for most advertisers. One 
reason: fierce network competition i- bringing forth more 
expensive shows, such as the NBC spectaculars. There are 
also the "normal" increases [or talent, -rript. etc Time 
costs are increasing with more t\ homes and larger -ta- 

lion lineups. 

4. Economic pressures an' causing many uhf 
stations to go of] the (dr. There is no apparent spon- 
sor prejudice againsl uhf stations \«-r se. Most sponsors 

realize that rate of uhf conversions i- closel) linked with 

ee <>f \hf competition a uhf station Faces. 
• >. Despite paucity of color sets in homes, color 
programing and station conversion to transmit color 
is continuing at a healthy rate. The number of color 
sets i- likel) to be much below earl) estimates. 

6. Time franchises are more vulnerahle. The 

bumping of I .S. Tobacco's Martin Kane and / oice of 
Firestone From NBC program lineup, the "right-of-wa) 
programing of spectaculars and strong grip on programing 

b\ network- are all evidence of this trend. 



36 



SPONSOR 



SPOT RADIO TRENDS 

Completi report stints pagi 195 



1. Major shifts have taken place in spot radio 
sales strategy of reps, stations. Among key develop- 
ments: more "service"' packages of news, weather, traffic 
bulletins aimed at in-home and out-of-rfome radio audi- 
ence; more efforts to stretch Monday-through-Frida) 
morning programing to Include Saturdays thus giving sta- 
tions an "extra morning'" to sell: more nighttime low-cost 
saturation plans; more programs beamed toward pin- 
pointed audiences. 

2. "Total" measurement of radio to he feature 
of fall spot buying. As timebuyers become more re- 
search-conscious, new research tools are being developed. 
Nielsen expects to start his new area radio-tv measure- 
ment service, Nielsen Station Index, in October. Pulse 
plans to conduct more full-area studies, more out-of-home 
lating. Time buying today also makes use of audience 
composition data, cumulative ratings, turnover. 

3. Spot business outlook continues to be general- 
ly optimistic. Spot program hours of mornings, after- 
noons, early evenings and late at night have been least 
hit by tv, are most popular with agency radio buyers. 
Annual level is over $135 million. 

4. Radio's '"''specialties'''' are gaining favor with 
audiences, buyers. More than six out of 10 stations air 
one or more farm shows. Nearly 140 radio outlets pro- 
gram more than 10 hours weekly of classical music. Some 
375 stations aim programs at Negro market; 22 outlets are 
100% Negro-programed. Foreign-language broadcasts are 
holding their own in many of the nation's largest metro- 
politan areas. 



NETWORK RADIO TRENDS 

pli It if pen t . '. 



1. Nighttime costs will take a dron ill the fall 
with time discounts set for an increase on CBS and NB( 
ABC is expected to follow suit. Mutual will ontinui its 
"automatic rate cuts" as new i\ outlets come on the air. 
i Vdmen quoted in this section explain whal effect t li«-\ 
think cost reduction m ill have. > 

2. Programing trends will be marked by greater 
use of strips at night. CBS will add an houi of them. 
There arc four reasons for this trend: i I i reduced show 
costs per advertiser. (2) sponsor can gel large cumulative 
audiences quickly, (3) networks can sell them as spot car- 
riers and ill audience- can remember them more i tsil) 
than different programs each day. 

3. More spot carriers will he offered for sale 
in the fall. Mutual i^ expected to gel an O.K. on carriei 
strips in the morning and afternoon from its affiliates. 
NBC has added a spol carrier .it night and CBS ma) sell 
its new strips in 7 1 ■j-niiniitc segments. 

4. New set count figures and radio listening data 
will shed additional light qu radio and will -park new 
radio promotion efforts \<\ broadcasters. ><t figures gath- 
ered by Politz for BAB and networks will be released 
shortlv. Mutual will also release data. 

5. Program formats will he increasingly marked 
by relaxed, easy-to-lislen-to fare with the disk jockey 
approach coloring nunc and inure shows. 1 be networks 
will seek to differentiate themsekes from independent sta- 
tion d.j. shows b\ using big names. 

6. The possibility of a regular measurement of 
auto listening nationally by Nielsen will ui\e fillip to 
networks effort- to reach auto listener 



Important recent net radio nui/.v include those of spon- 
sors below. Merit Card bought Martin Block on ABC, company's 
first net radio buy. Royal Crown bought Robert Q. Lewis on CBS 
Saturday mornings to get big pre-marketing audience. Florida Citrus 



Commission is sponsoring "Florida Calling " on MBS, first net buy for 
Commission. Prudential is buying into "Fibber McGee and Molly" on 
NBC at night. Prudential wants to reach men, biggest insurance 
buyers, feels night is best time. See Network radio starting page 251 



FLORIDA range Juice 



G* Hl"^ 5 ' 





COLA 



t'M 



12 JULY 1954 



37 




2fi article* of media study 

now beinif printed in book form 

The 26 articles of the All-Media Evalua- 
tion Study art now being reprinted in 
book form. Copies should be available 
in August at $4 each. Volume will run to 
about 200 pages, 130,000 words, sponsor 
format, with all the numerous tables, 
(■hurts dud surveys as they appeared in 
tlu original articles. Agencies, adver- 
tisers, broadcasters will find volume 
most complete on media evaluation 
published to date. You may order now. 



Highlights of the All-Media study 

Here's a summary of what each of 26 articles in 2-year study contains. You 
will want to read, then file this with study as convenient reference 



Sponsor's two-year All-Media Evaluation Study will 
have been time wasted if the agencyman, advertiser and 
broadcaster for whom it was undertaken don't use it. 

To give you an idea of its scope the following summary 
i next three pages) was prepared. You'll find it not onlj 
a concise digest of what the study entailed hut also a 
reminder of what you might have overlooked or forgotten 
when the articles first appeared. After reading it. we 
suggest \<»u file it with your media articles as a reference. 

For those who want the study in book form, we BUggest 
\>>u order the hound volume due to be published in 
August at $4 a copy. 

Here are the 10 most important conclusions of the series 
i for a full discussion, see 28 June 1954 issue) : 



38 



1. Media evaluation lags far behind copy, market. 

2. Much money is wasted on noa-scientific practices. 

3. Lack of research on much advertising is appalling. 

4. On the other hand, widespread acceptance of many 
new "tools" is equalK had. 

5. Refusal to experiment in use of media is notorious. 

6. Methods for choosing media, especiallv for new 
products, are often primitive. 

7. Much research to prove one medium "best is useless. 

8. It is possible to set up an accurate intermedia test. 

9. Reasons given by some advertisers for not using 
air media are incredible. 

10. Psychology, especially study of motivations, has 
a vital place tn media evaluation. * * * 

SPONSOR 



PART 1. "Why evaluate ad media?" Ten pages of 
charts including 30 tips to advertisers, agencies and media 
on evaluation. Two-page chart spells out how typical agen- 
cy analyzes each major market. Another chart gives figures 
through years to show how all major media complement 
each other after initial period of competition (all prosper 
or show revenue declines simultaneously). Article shows 
why media selection still is in "cave man stage," cites ex- 
amples of various yardsticks (20 April 1953 issue). 

qp 9fi ff* 

PART 2. "Media Basics I." Two pages, including one 
full page of charts and figures, are devoted to each of the 
following media: newspapers, direct mail, radio and maga- 
zines. Advantages, limitations, biggest clients and growth 
charts are given for each medium. Spokesmen foT each 
medium tell why advertisers should include their particu- 
lar media in total advertising schedule (4 May 1953 issue). 

qp 2ft qp 

PART 3* "Media Basics II." Two pages, including one 
full page of charts and figures, are devoted to: television, 
business papers, outdoor and transit. Advantages, limita- 
tions, biggest clients and growth charts are again given for 
each medium and media spokesmen tell why advertisers 
should include their particular media in total advertising 
schedule (18 May 1953 issue). 



JPART 4. "I. How to choose media." Different agencies 
use different yardsticks in selecting media for ad campaigns. 
The various techniques are discussed here. Tips from spon- 
sor's All-Media Advisory Board and executives of research 
organizations are given on setting up research, choosing 
objectives. Chart comparing billings of magazines and air 
media rebuts Life's claim that it leads media parade in an- 
nual billings (1 June 1953 issue). 



.PART 5. "II. How to choose media." Debate on wheth- 
er some advertisers' newspaper backgrounds and complex- 
ity of air media create bias in favor of print. Twenty-six 
advertisers, agencymen and researchers discuss factors they 
personally consider most important in selecting and rec- 
ommending media (15 June 1953 issue). 



PART 6. "What sponsors should know about Life's new 
4-media study." Article debates whether Life's study is 
really impartial, reprints charts from study to show mis- 
use of statistical data. Network researchers' and agency- 
men's opinions on the study are quoted. Highlights of the 
report are given with comments by air and print experts 
on various points (29 June 1953 issue). 






*e 



* 



* * 



PART 7. "Beware of these media research pitfalls!" 
Why both the print and air media are guilty of over- 
reaching in their research. Various media sales tests — 
including tests made by radio networks — are examined to 
show validity or non-validity. Four principal methods of 
measuring sales effectiveness are given, with their weak- 
nesses. Chart points up 10 media research traps for the 
unwary (27 July 1953 issue). 

12 JULY 1954 



<•<• 



1) 



<V 




99 



33 



a? 



39 



99 



Here are excerpts front letters 
to SPONSOR on Media Study 

RESEARCHER. Benjamin Shimberg, asst. to pres., 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton: "I think 
SPONSOR is to be commended for undertaking a 
project of such magnitude. In so doing you are 
rendering an important public service, not only to your 
subscribers but students and researchers as well." 

AGENCYMAN. Reid Webber, president, Webber 
Advertising Agency, Grand Rapids: "This is a noble 
service to the advertising industry and should 
strengthen the scientific use and result-fulness of 
the several media." 

MARKETING MAN: H. D. Everett Jr., director of 
marketing research, Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, 
Mich.: "Again I would like to compliment you on this 
series of articles and put in a request for several sets 
oif reprints of the whole series after its completion." 

STATION MANAGER. Frank Stubbs, station manager, 
KLMS, Lincoln, Neb.: "I am sure that this will 
prove to be one of the most valuable things yet 
done in the business and I am most anxious to 
get all results in a single volume." 

AGENCYMAN. James A. Boyce, The Mautner Agency, 
Milwaukee: "Have found your recent Media Series 
both invaluable and elusive — seems EVERYONE has 
found a use for it. The problem in our agency 
is that only I tore the series out of the magazines 
when it appeared. Would you be good enough 
to send me a reprint of the entire series which I 
could file for general agency use — then maybe 
I'll get to use mine once in a while!" 

SPOT SALES MANAGER. Sam Cook Digges, general 
sales manager, CBS TV Spot Sales: "Please reserve 
me a copy of SPONSOR'S All-Media Study. . . . This 
is to be a personal copy for me, and I will be glad 
to send you a personal check. . . . SPONSOR is cer- 
tainly to be congratulated on this excellent study." 

MEDIA MANAGER. Laura B. Mang, manager of media 
department, Moser & Cotins, New York: "The articles 
have presented very intelligent treatment of contro- 
versial subjects and we shall greatly appreciate having 
them in book form for examination and reference." 

STATION MANAGER: Arch L Madsen, manager, 
KOVO, Provo, Utah: "I think your marvelous Media 
Evaluation Study is one of the very finest things that 
has ever happened to us in radio. Please arrange to 
send this station four copies of this entire series." 



39 



( oming up next on nicclia 

/ „ ,, articles growing out >) tht ill-Media Evalua 
lion Study will bt published in SPON80B soon; (1) 
Da I, Dunne's analysis of media trends which hi 
inn, I. for Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell d Bayles when 
tru dia >■ sean h dv • ■ tot ; (2) Advi rtt st /.'- 
search's test oj a half-how segment oj Your Show 
i>i Shows vs. a doable-pagi spread in Life on ad 
r< i all. Gu< sa who won! 



PART 8. "II. Beware of these media research pitfalls!" 
Entire text of Advertising Research Foundation's criteria 
for advertising and marketing research is reprinted. Twen- 
ty-one researchers, agencymen, advertisers and air experts 

lell how the) set up tests and use media research i 2 1 
VugUSl 1953 issue i. 



PART 13. "Win these 31 advertisers DON'T use air 

media. Results of mail-and-phone survey of 199 advertis- 
ers who are non-users of the air media. Easy-to-read chart 
li-l- name oi company, product it manufactures or dis- 
tributes, agency, 1033 advertising budget and the reason* 
it gave for not using air media. Among reasons most 
common!) cited: product '"unsuitable"' for air advertising; 
radio and or t\ are "too expensive": radio gives too much 
coverage where product isn't being sold; radio and/or tv 
"flopped" in past, firm hasn't tried them since i 16 No- 
vember 1953 issue). 



I*/1RT II. "'What's wrong with the rating services." 
Comprehensive reference chart gives point-by-point com- 
parison of the rating services from the standpoints of basic 
data supplied: techniques; sample bases; limitations, and 
advantages. Includes sponsor's own ideal rating system 
and how the six existing services compare from aspect of 
sample size, breakdown of figures given, and so on. In- 
cludes seven important DONT'S in using ratings (28 De- 
cember 1033 issue). 



PART 9. "How 72 advertisers evaluate media." Four 
pages of charts tabulate answers each of 72 advertisers 
gave to sponsor's 16-part questionnaire on media evalua- 
tion. These advertisers spend total of S137 million annu- 
ally on advertising. Questions are explained and sponsor's 
conclusions given. Includes information on advertisers' 
sources for media data; methods of determining media ef- 
fectiveness; which medium advertiser considers most ef- 
fective. Includes list of 1 1 most important facts learned 
in survev of 2.000 advertisers I 7 September 1953 issue). 



PART 10. "How 94 agencies evaluate media." Four 
pages of charts tabulate answers each of 94 agenevmen 
gave to sponsor's 16-part questionnaire on media evalua- 
tion. Includes information on agencies' sources for media 
data: methods of determining media effectiveness; which 
medium agenc) considers most effective. Background of 
admen answering questionnaire is also given. List of 10 
most important facts learned in this surve) of 1.000 agencv - 
men (21 September 1953 issue). 



PART 11. "How BBD0 evaluates media." Bernard C. 
Duffy, presidenl of Batten. Barton. Durstine \ Osborn, one 
ol worlds largest agencies, gives personal opinions on the 
various media, tells what his agencv wants to know about 
media before planning an advertising campaign. Included 
are specific examples of which media are best to lill special 
needs of certain products (5 October 1953 issue) 

PART 12. '"How I. mil Mogul tests media weekly for 
Rayco." Customers fill out card- while thev wait to get 
their auto seat covers fitted. These cards indicate what 
made customei come to Rayco for seat covers and in what 
media they've noticed Rayco ads. Article i:ivc> results "I 
such tests, with detailed explanation of how agency can go 
about Betting up similar Bystem for its own clients. Full 
page of charts shows Low vmi can profit bv being able to 
check media on weekly basis (19 October 1953 issue). 



PART 15. "What's wrong with print measurement ser- 
vices?" Facts about the three readership sendees includ- 
ing their sampling methods, questioning procedures and 
how much each one costs. List of basic questions adver- 
tisers raise about readership sendees. Article includes 
opinions of researchers on the services, explains win know- 
ing the facts about each one is vital to advertisers and 
agencies ill Januarv 1954 issue). 



PART 10. "How different rating services vary in the 
same market." Ward Dorrell, research director of John 
Blair & Co. and Blair Tv, station rep organization, peints 
out the fact that different sendees often come up with 
widely divergent ratings and sets-in-use figures for the 
same market. Dorrell underscores importance of using 
other criteria besides ratings when planning advertising 
campaign. Three easy-to-read bar charts give examples of 
variation in same markets I 25 Januarv 1034 issue i . 



PART 17. "Can you set up an 'ideal' media test?" 
Most researchers assert it's impossible to set up a fool 
proof or ideal intermedia test. Includes descriptions of 
three agencv attitudes towards testing and explanation of 
win testing i< so important and so difficult to perfect 
Three table- describe the "ideal" intermedia test based 
on interview- with 150 media expert-, li-t 10 do's in 
media testing and -bow some variables that make testing 
difficult '22 February 1954 issue). 



PART 18. "II. Can you set up the "ideal' media test?" 
Article quotes -even media authorities on bow to solve 
the media-testing problem. \n analysis of the four meth- 
od- of market resean h recommended bv one independent 
researchei is given. List ol 51 advertisers who have tested 
media, chart ol media tests used bv various agencies and 
advertisers and 10-point market testing check list bv \. C. 
Nielsen are included (8 March 1954 issue). 



40 



SPONSOR 



PART 19. "How Block Drug tests media." George J. 
Abrams, advertising director of the Block Drug Co., Jer- 
sey City, tells what his firm has learned from hundreds of 
media and copy tests and the steps it takes to set one up. 
Block Drug spent $5.5 million in advertising last year, 
6595 ' n air media. Among Abrams' tips: use markets 
typical of the U. S.; don't accept statistics blindly (22 
March 1954 issue). 



P/XRT 20. "I. The psychology of media." Article gives 
results of tests to indicate which media are best under 
certain typical conditions. Findings by sociologist Joseph 
T. Mapper on 20 years of pre-tv testing on psychology 
and media are given in chart form. Objective reports on 
Prof. Paul F. Lazarsfeld's newspaper-vs. -radio study and 
other experimental studies are included. Among the tests 
discussed are experiments by Dr. Frank Stanton, now pres- 
ident of CBS. while he was an instructor at Ohio State in 
1933 (5 April 1954). 

*n "v *x* 

PART 21. '41. Psychology of media." Nine statements 
by leading philosophers, psychologists, researchers, adver- 
tising executives and college professors on the psychologi- 
cal values of media are included. Article examines which 
media contribute most to raising the cultural level of the 
American people; explains why air media are "dynamic" 
and print media "static"; tells why one psychologist feels 
all media evaluation should be put on a psychological 
basis (19 April 1954 issue). 

PART 22. "III. Psychology of media: Why admen 
buy what they do." Adman's own personality and charac- 
ter may have more direct bearing on his media choice 
than the physical or psychological qualities of the various 
media themselves. Article reveals inner motivations of ad- 
men in their choice of media may derive from background, 
job security, personal bias, desire to win recognition. Dr. 
Ernest Dichter, president, Institute for Research in Mass 
Motivations and Media Advisory Board member, explains 
why he feels fear and insecurity often hit admen. Due to 
fear, he says, admen often fall back on substitutes for 
creative thinking such as the cost-per-1,000 concept and 
repetition (3 May 1954 issue). 

2f» Jfr ^f. 

P. ART 23. "Do radio and tv move goods?" Two charts 
document fact that most large advertisers, in all product 
categories, use air heavily. A total of 66 advertisers spend- 
ing $178 million this vear (nearlv $50 million of it in air 



SPONSOR thanks Its advisers 

For 22 months 12 leaders in tin a< g /,,., 

fession (names printed below) helped spi 
maintain a high h i - 1 o) .,;-,,, ,/ 

in its All-Media Study. Now sponsor wishes i<> 
thank these 12 ad experts /</«> th< do ■> 

men, advertisers, media n psycholo- 

gists, broadcasters and others who ha 
to tin series during tin two-yeai span. 



media) answer sponsor's four-part questionnaire, tell what 
media they use and how will they sell. Article quotes 47 
heavy air advertisers on why they like radio and l\. what 
are strengths and weaknesses of both media and what re- 
sults they have had (17 May 1954 issue). 



PART 24. "Media article 24: Conclusions by Advisor) 
Board." sponsor's Editorial Director Ray Lapica asked 
the 12 members of the \1I-Media \d\ isor\ Board to write 
down their comments, summaries, interpretations or refu- 
tations of the previous articles in the series. Six of the 12 
discuss such topics as magazine-of-the-air tv concept; out- 
of-home radio audience; 10 questions to consider in time 
buying (31 May 1954 issue). 



PART 25. "Media article 25: Conclusions by Advisor) 
Board." The last six of the 12 members of the All-Media 
Advisory Board present their comments, criticisms, inter- 
pretations of the previous articles in the series, \inong 
the topics discussed: relationship among distribution, 
product and media: importance <>f cumulative advertising 
impressions; ratings as a yardstick i I 1 June 1 ( J54 issue I . 



PART 26. "SPONSOR'S conclusions." Final article in 
the series gives personal observations, conclusions drawn 
from hundreds of interviews, -urveys conducted in course 
of 22-month study. The stud) involved interviewing per- 
sonally some 200 of the leading advertising experts in nine 
cities. It meant 14 trips, 11 separate mail surveys, one "t 
them alone covering 1,000 advertisers and 1,000 agencies. 
Among SPONSOR'S conclusions: The advertiser, agency or 
broadcaster who stops trying to find a better method of 
evaluating media will fall behind (28 June 1951 issue I . 



SPONSOR'S All-Media Advisory Board 

George J. Abrams ad director, Block Drug Co., Jersey City Marion Harper Jr. president, McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York 

Vincent R. Bliss executive v. p., Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago Ralph H. Harrington ad mgr., Gen. Tire & Rubber Co., Akron 

Arlyn E. Cole president, Cole & Weber, Portland, Ore. Morris L. Hite president, Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas 

Or. Ernest Dichter pres., Inst, for Research in Mass Motivations J. Ward Maurer ad director, Wildroot Co., Buffalo 

Stephens Dietz „ v.p., Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, New York Raymond R. Morgan pres., Raymond R. Morgan Co., Hollywood 

Ben R. Donaldson ad & sales promotion director, Ford, Dearborn Henry Schachte senior v. p., Bryan Houston, New York 

12 JULY 1954 41 





I his map is J. Wttrd >I«iur«'r'.v gitidt" in ml planning 

Wildroot breaks U.S. into 100 natural product distribution areas, plans each market's 
budget separately. Maurer, ad director, buys as many radio announcements in each 
market as budget permits, uses at least one comic-strip weekly per market. Left- 
over money goes to other media. Budgets are based on sales, past experience 




Whj Wildroot has 100 ad budgets 

Company believes niarket-bi -market approach avoids waste in spending', 
helps achieve proper balance between loeal and national ad media 



\\ ildroot is unique because: 

1. It has 100 a<l budgets, not one. 

2. It spend- 35' i 01 it- over $3 mil- 
lion ;ul budget on spot radio, nothing 
on network radio or l\ . 

.'■5. It has had onl) one agenc) o\ er 
the past in \ear- BBDO. 

1. It has a unique jingle which it- 
own ad director, .1. Ward Maurer, 
m rote 1 I \ i.ii - ago and w hich i- <till 
going strong. 

\\ alk into I. \\ .ml Man hi- office 

and llie In -I tiling that < at lie- you] 



42 



by Keith Tranttno 

eye is a big map ol the I nited State-. 
Maurer i- advertising director of the 
\\ ildroot Co. in Buffalo. The bright!) 
colored map on his wall isn't a politi- 
cal or geographic one. It'- an econom- 
i< map showing the Wildroot's whole- 
sale trading area-, the distribution 
areas surrounding the cities where 
Wildroot jobbers and wholesalers have 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll! 
case history 



their warehouses isee picture aboi 

That map i- the basis for Wild root's 
national and loeal advertising budgets 
(principally for Wildroot Cream Oil 
hair tonic). Win does Maurer rel\ 
on cartography when planning hi> ad- 
vertising program? Win doe- he split 
the country up into a hundred mar- 
kets.' Here's what he says: 

"I believe that all national advertis- 
ing should be looked at carefully. 
When you break down your national 
advertising media on a county-by- 

SPONSOR 






county basis — or, as we did, on a mar- 
ket-by-market basis — you see that you 
can't cover the country with national 
advertising alone. 

"In too many markets you'd be over- 
spent. 

"To cover the country, you need 
both local and national advertising. 
But that poses a toughie: How do you 
know how much you should put into 
national? How much into local? 

"So we break the country down in- 
to natural distribution areas. Then 
we get the circulation figures for na- 
tional and local media for each county 
which is within the distribution area. 
From these figures we can determine 
exactly what each medium costs us in 
the market. 

"Maybe we discover we're not get- 
ting good coverage from national me- 
dia in a certain market. Then we know 
we should use more local media. We 
can figure out how much money we 
should spend in local media by know- 
ing the population of the market, the 
cost-per- 1,000 of reaching potential 
customers and the cost of the national 
media in that market." 

For every color (representing a dif- 
ferent market I on the big map on 
Maurer's office wall there is a separate 
budget. 

When Maurer and his staff figured 
out the Wildroot wholesale trading 
areas, they just happened to end up 
with an even 100 markets. 

"When I say we have 100 markets, 
it looks as if we arbitrarily divided the 
country into a hundred pieces. We 
didn't. That's how many wholesale dis- 
tribution areas we have," he explains. 

There are other advantages, besides 
allocation of national and local media 
budgets, to working on a market basis. 
For one thing, says Maurer, you can 
get county-by-county statistics that will 
help you figure out what your sales for 
the whole market should be I by add- 
ing up the counties in the market). 

On the county level, Wildroot uses 
Commerce Department, Census and 
Nielsen figures, among others. Maurer 
told SPONSOR: 

"I believe that our 100 market ap- 
proach is at least somewhat unique. I 
have no doubt but that Procter & Gam- 
ble, and a few similar companies, who 
are so research minded, have been 
working on this same principle, and 
perhaps have perfected it to a finer 
degree than we have been able to do. 
However, from my knowledge of 



imtui MtttM ii in ■ Hiiiiiininiiiiiniiii iihh ■■■iiiiuii iiimiii i mi ihiimii imiii 

Wildroot's approach bulls down to: 



LOO advertising budgets one for each wholesale distribution area 
Cost of national advertising broken down by a count} bj county basis 

Each Ideal ad budget (lepra. Is partly upon national media COSl in 

Entire radio advertising budget — $1.1 million into spol 

Wildroot retains campaign theme, changes media, way media are used 
Agency considered business partner rather than strictlj idea factory 



aiMiiiuuiiiiii n ii mi hi iniiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii minimum h mimimmimi iiimmmiiimii mmuii 



what other companies do, and the peo- 
ple that I have talked with in connec- 
tion with my ANA activities, I be- 
lieve that any companies who have em- 
ployed this approach are certainly in 
the minority and if sponsor can do no 
more in this article than to stimulate 
the thinking of the majority of the 
companies who have not attempted this 
approach, I think it is a worthwhile 
contribution." 

The budget for each of the 100 mar- 
kets now is based on Wildroot's sales 
figures and die company's own past 
experience. But Maurer says: 

"We do not consider only the sales 
and advertising relationship, but also 
take into consideration such factors as 
the total hair tonic industry sales, on 
the market-by-market basis; share of 
market figures which are furnished by 
the A. C. Nielsen Co.; male popula- 
tion figures according to the 1950 
census, etc." 

At present 11% of Wildroot's $3 
million-plus media budget goes into 
national media — and currently nation- 
al media consists of only magazines. 

Thus, about $2.7 million is going 
into local media. This is fairly new 
for Wildroot which, in the past, allo- 
cated most of its budget to national 
media. "But when you look at it from 
a market-by-market basis." savs Mau- 
rer, "it becomes apparent that a com- 
bination of local and national adver- 
tising is the only thing that makes 
sense. 

"I do not mean to take a crack at 
national advertising. However. I think 
most people who serious!) study the 
proposition will find out that a combi- 
nation of both national and local is 
ideal." 

Two basic media for all W ildroot 
markets are spot radio and dail\ news- 
papers. More than a third of W ild- 
root's total ad budget goes into spot 
radio, with the company currently us- 
ing more than 500 stations. 

In each market. Wildroot bins at 



least one COmic -trip per week in a 
newspaper. And as many radio an- 
nouncements as it can afford. If there 
is money left over for u-c in a partic- 
ular market, it is invested in car card-, 
television, outdoor and other media. 

While each of the 100 budgets now 
is based on sales figures and past ex- 
perience. Maurer believes that it i- 
onl) a matter of tune until he can fig- 
ure out the potential sales figures for 
each market. With this data, "it rna\ 
be more intelligent for us to base ad- 
vertising budgets on each markets po- 
tential," says Maurer. 

"If that happens, and with the op- 
portunity to sales test in those mar- 
kets, then we may get close to finding 
the answer to a problem we've won- 



Copy tests sold Maurer on using Fearless Fos- 
dick for '54 campaign. Fosdiclt ads embody 
"Get Wildroot Cream Oil, Charlie" jingle 
theme used past 12 years. Maurer wrote jingle 



^EARLESS 
/^bSDICK 

OETT?C"nvE 
3v Cvg. On fifa- 



*4I 

an -. • , 

I 'J**-.. ***** 



1 ** AG <^>4,f-4>WE I TuEiaLTOO- 

- .-f C -m ~ 




*„. M»4 &U^ L T~% IN ""« ftOCV * : ^^J -•? !•■■*. , i - • 

W*0» TXAT *«i„ r— — — jP^v, -* • cue - 




f NEU,BL£»» 



- C«»X»-E=> | LOC* ► 



wfc>-)" WLEHOOT CBtAM 

DO TWE T».\» " ASO saOic 
Ann-face- moOi^touXK 



i >oua A«Msr~ 

J<wS- UNI "EX M-O 




don't mws THIS TWW1C 



12 JULY 1954 



43 



lined about [or a long, Long time: 
When do we reach the point <>l dimin- 
ishing returns? 

•'It took .in awfull) long time to 
work ciii "in I' 111 markets, and to 
make u|> a different budget Eoi each 
market," Maurei add-. "It's -till time- 
( onsumin 

For Maurer. however, the problem 
«l«>iil>tt«-—— was a lot easier than !"i oth- 
ers less mathematically inclined. 

\i an advertising convention in 
White Sulphur Springs a year ago 
Maurei was asked l>\ a sponsor re- 
porter after a golf game how much a 
golfer would lose it lie lost every bet 
at 10c a hole, to he doubled on each 
hole. In less than one minute — be- 
tween soaping and showering — Mau- 
rei had it figured out: "Over $13,000." 
(Exact figure: $13,107.20.) 

In discussing \\ ildroot's advertising 
hi-torv. Maurer will tell you that 
"'there are two wavs ol advertising 
oui kind of product. 

"One: lake your pick of media. 
then stick with it with bulldog deter- 
mination, changing only your theme. 

"Two: Take a theme, stick with it, 
ami change onl) your media and the 
wa\ you use the media. 

"We do the latter. We've used the 
same theme — 'get Wildroot Cream Oil 
Charlie' — for 12 years. Instead of 
changing our theme, we've changed 



media and our media use. 

Now spending 35' < of it- budget in 
spot radio. \\ ildroot i- not won ied 
about the nuinhei uf tv stations in 
am given market. It due- buj radio 
time to avoid tv competition, however, 
insofai as the period of daj is con- 
cerned. 

Maurer. through \\ ildroot's agency, 
BBDO, u-uallv buys radio announce- 
ments in the earl) morning, late in the 
afternoon I to catch teenagers since 
Maurei i- convinced it is important to 
■jet customers while tin-vie young), 
some late at night. Maurer tries to 
reach a male audience. "Of course, 
he savs. "it's hard to reach an all-male 
audience, but we do want a pretty 
good pari of our audience to be male. 
We also want a voting audience. Prac- 
lieallv all our advertising the past 10 
or 15 years has been planned with the 
idea of not onlv reaching men. but also 
young fellows.' 

As basic to Wildroot's advertising 
strateg) a- it- never-changing theme is 
its use of the W ildrool singing com- 
mercial — now considered a classic in 
the realm of musical announcement-. 

Maurer wrote the words and music 
to the jingle in 1942. He won't -av it 
made Wildroot the largest selling hair 
Ionic overnight, but he's prettv sure 
it helped in boosting Wildroot to its 
claimed No. 1 position. 



Wildroot's jingle has been on the 
,iii since 1943 but it didn't mark the 

company's first radio experience. 
Wildroot used air media as eariv a- 
\ ( y\2. but until Mautcr's jingle came 
along the firm's radio results were 
somewhat discouraging. 

Back in '32 W ildroot sponsored a 
weekK 15-minute program featuring 
an "Elizabeth May" who gave women 
hints on the care ol the hair. I here 
also was some spot activity; Wildroot 
bad participations, foi example, on Ar- 
thur Godfrey's Sundial on W JSV | now 
WTOP), Washing D. C. 

There was a three-year hiatus, then 
W ildroot sponsored a program in it- 
home town of Buffalo during the la-t 
13 weeks of 1935. The compan) want- 
ed to build it into a show of network 
calibre but it nev er quite came oil. 

The vear 1936 Wildroot would just 
as soon forget. Everything went into 
radio thai \eai neailv ever) nickel 
of the $250,000 budget. Results were 
less than astonishing. 

About the time Wildroot was look- 
ing around for a program in '36, led 
Husing had just published a hook. 10 
Years Behind the Mike. W ildroot hired 
Husing on CBS. put him on a show 
named after the hook, gave him mii-i- 
cal support from a group called The 
Charioteers lone of The Charioted-. 
[Please turn to page 224) 



li|i'iici/ is "blUineM partner": Wildroot, BBDO ad execs 
hold frequent meetings to exchange ideas, information. BBDO has 
been firm's agency for over 40 years, is regarded as "business part- 
ner" by Mcurer, is in on all planning from beginning. Below, I. to r., 



Alan D. Lehmann, BBDO a e (seated), Earl Obetmeyer, asst. to Wild- 
root ad dir. (standing), J. Ward Maurer, Wiidroot ad director, Jay 
Larman, asst. a e, BBDO (standing right), Charles Dentiger, Wild- 
root media director. In center: star of Wildroot commercials, Fosdick 




44 



SPONSOR 



10 TOP CASE HISTORIES 

Updated condensations of SPONSOR articles appear below. Many other condensed articles 
plus capsule result stories appear in Radio Results and Tv Results, out this month 




ERICAN AIRLINES: ALL-NIGHT RADIO 



MUSIC GETS BIG AUDIENCE AT LOW COST 

.1 rtifl, (tjijt, ared 4 May 1953 



Few businesses are as competitive as airline operation, and 
no airline can stay on top of the heap unless its management 
comes up with a steady stream of fresh ideas — particularly in 
the twin fields of advertising and airline promotion. 

In summer '52 C. R. Smith, the hard-driving Texan who is 
AA's president, spotted a new advertising opportunity for his 
airline. An executive who often sits up half the night to go 
over detailed reports from far-flung AA regions, Smith just as 
often keeps a radio going at his elbow. How many others, 
Smith wondered, also tune their radios to all-night broadcasts? 

Research executives of CBS and Ruthrauff & Ryan, AA's 
agency, scheduled a meeting. The findings: audiences are big 
and costs are low in nighttime radio. 

By the end of 1952, there were many concrete developments. 
CBS Radio Spot Sales had quietly checked with five owned-and- 
operated CBS outlets— WCBS, WEET, WBBM, KCBS and KNX 
—and a key affiliate, WTOP. 

When the contract was signed it proved to be a corker. Con- 
vinced that it had the right time slots and the right program 



format, AA made ■< deal for the largest single block of radio 
airtime in broadcasting history — 30,000 hours over a three-year 
period. Cost for time and talent: an estimated $1,500,000. 

The midnight-to-dawn (five and one halt' hours) shows fli 
plenty of advertising coverage to the sponsoring airline. By a 
conservative CBS estimate, something like 80% of AA sales 
territorj is within easy reach of the six CBS outlet-. 

Program 'policy: The problem which faced AA and CBS from 
the beginning was to find a program with wide appeal. 

AA's shows feature a smooth blend of com 
tunes, operatic excerpts and popular symphonies. 

Commercial policy: Early in the game, AA and Ruthrauff & 
Ryan decided commercials would be live, in semi ad-lib st 

During the first two hours of any of AA's shows, the 
mercials are tailored to the particular market. 

The last three-and-a-half hours of AA's all-night shows 
ture institutional pitches which are general. * * * 

What's happened since: AA's radio contracl as reported above 
runs until 13 April 1956. Air advertising today is unchai - 




PALL MALL: AIR GETS OVER 50% OF BUDGET, 
HELPS MAKE CIGARETTE NO. 4 IN SALES 



Artich appeared 23 March 1953 



One of the hottest trends in the cigarette business today is 
the sizzling sales climb of king-size brands. And the hottest 
king size brand is Pall Mall. 

T.ike all big cigarette advertisers, American Cigarette and 
Cigar (division of American Tobacco) places over 50% of its 
budget for air. sponsor estimated that somewhere between $5.5 
and $6 million would be spent to advertise Pall Mall in 1953 
and about three-quarters of this would go into radio and tv. 

The tv cost trend had been hitting Pall Mall hard, what with 
it carrying two network shows, The Big Story and Doug Ed- 
wards and the News. So American Cigarette and Cigar and its 
agency, Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles put a tv show on 
alternate weeks. The program affected was The Big Story, the 
alternate-week partner, The Simoniz Co. 

The new surplus was diverted to other media. Half went to 
magazines and Sunday supplements, half into spot radio. 

The campaign is Pall Mall's biggest in spot radio since its 
famous saturation drive during 1941- '42. It 's in 45 markets daily. 

Tobaccomen have been watching Pall Mall 's meteoric rise for 

12 JULY 1954 



a number of years wi bow did Pall Mall do it .' 

One of the keys to the solution is another question 
Pall Mall sales on the rise because it is king size, or are king- 
size sales on the risi of Pall Mall.' 

It should not be surprising to learn that Paul M. Halm, presi- 
dent of both American Tobacco and American Cigarette and 
Cigar, favors the latter viewpoint. 

Those who take the opposite viewpoint, namely that l'all Mall 
has been riding a king size trend anyway, come up with this 
analysis: (1) King size cigarettes are on the way up because 
consumers feel that the extra length filters out nicotine. (2) 
Kings an popular with women. (3) Appeal to economy-minded. 

Two more reasons are often given to explain 

1. Co '■ Copy themes are fairly stable. 

2. The pi color. The design and color ("Pall Mall 
red") of the pack had a lot to do with it- * * * 
WTiat's happened since: Firm sponsored ABC TV- l: 

show this past season, is switching to Danny Thomas, ABC TV, 
in fall. The radio drive continues through '54. 



45 



LO L°L C _ASE HISTORIES 




CASTRO CONVERTIBLES: ONE STORE BECOMES 
$10 MILLION BUSINESS WITH AID OF TV 



Artich appeared 18 May 195 I 



Can a local retail store tit t\ into its advertising budget .' 
Castro Convertibles, until 1948 n Bingle store with a handful 
of salesmen, found thai the small advertiser can afford tele 
vision, and, furthermore, thai clever use of air media can lie 
the Bkj rockel to success. 

Today, Castro Convertible sofas are manufactured in several 
plants, are sold in seven stores in the New York metropolitan 
area. Until his debut in television in 1948, Bernard Castro, 
incident of Castro I mi \ci t ildes, ne\er sold more than LOO units 
a week in his small L' 1 st Street and Sixth Avenue store. A 
SPONSOR guesstimate places Castro's present sales volume at well 

over $10 million. Agency: Newton Advertising. 

Known since L948 for his memorable tv commercial, Castro 
began using radio in October 1950 to gel frequency of impact. 
Here is Castro's formula: 

Use tv tor product demonstration, and to identify copy theme 
(iu Cast id's case: "easy to operate") with product. If your 

product is bought by women for the home, place your com 
mercials near earlj evening programing to create demand bj 
the .utile family. 
Castro gol the idea for a film commercial the firm lias been 

using e\er since I'.Us when he s:iu P.ernadette, his live year old 
daughter, trot into the living room and open the living room 
sofa unaided, it hit him immediately: show Bernadette in the 
film actually opening a t'astro Convertible. Copy theme: "So 
easj to operate, even a child can open it." 



'I his i',ii second film was shown once weekly starting July 
ll'ls, then gradually, as ('astro saw the results of the demon 

stration, the schedule was increased. Today the film runs about 

nine times a week in New York and as often as 1 ."i times weekly 

in other areas where Castro recently opened new showrooms. 

Yarioiis factors not connected with advertising may have 
help.-d toward his growth: (1) The housing shortage in the late 
Forties was verj acute, hence the trend towards smaller, com 
pacter apartments in the metropolitan area. '2' The market 

for convertible sofas was wide open. Though they'd been 

available in some form since the Twenties, they were little 
known to the public. (3) Castro was among the tirst designer- 
manufacturers to develop a convertible which tilled both the 
need for comfortable Bleeping at night, and was a handsome 

piece Of furniture during the day. However, the little girl 
opening up a ('astro sofa by herself in his television commercial 
probably contributed more than anything else toward making 
('astro a household word in the New York area. Castro belli 

sponsor estimated that Castro spent Bome $400,000 annually 
on radio and television in L953. He places hi* newspaper adver 
tising direct -full-page ads announcing a special sale. 

On radio Castro uses on second announcements, also sponsors 
10- and 1" minute segments on four d.j. shows. Announcements 
are preceded by jingle sung to mandolin accompaniment. * * * 
What's happened since: Today Castro has added four show 
looms outside N.Y. in the East, has expanded air to new areas. 




SHELL CHEMICAL; SPOT RADIO IS FLEXIBLE, 
SPEEDY MEDIUM FOR INSECTICIDE MESSAGES 

Article appeared 26 January 1953 



There are few businesses as unpredictable as the business of 
supplying agricultural insecticides to farmers. Linked as it is 
with farming itself, it is plagued by the wanton habits of 
weather, by floods and drought, by the sudden appearance of 
insect pests. 

An advertiser seeking to put across his message to farmers 
when it is most timely needs a flexible medium. Shell Chemical 
Corp. has found that flexibility and speed in spot radio. 

Here, in a nutshell, is why Shell Chemical needs a medium 
like spot radio to reach farmers: 

Item: Shell advertises its insecticide, Aldrin, for a varietj 
of cotton pests. Ad\ertising must be timed with the appearance 
of each pest. 

Item: shell's soil fumigant, D-D, must be applied before 

clops are planted. Moreover, the ground must li,. just right — ■ 
not too hard, not too soft. Therefore. Shell, its tield reps and 
its agency. .1. Walter Thompson, must be on the Kail to catch 
the farmer with radio commercials at the proper time. 

\ shell insecticide was approved bj the I', s. Depart 

mint ot Agriculture for a certain crop iu a certain area last 

ag. It was i,,,, [ate to applj the insecticide by the usual 
method and special instructions for the farmer were necessary. 

Tie fastest u;,,\ to gel tins, instructions to him was by radio. 

Shell'- advertising manager, Merton Keel. said. "We can 

have COPJ on the air I s' hours alter a call for hid]) from our 

reps, There's no other ad medium that will do a .job for 



US as fast as that. 

''We like radio for its economy, too.'' Keel added. "Actually 
we spend less than ln r r of our ad budget on radio, hut don't 
forget that farm radio is pretty cheap. We can buy two an- 
nouncements a day on a station for as little as .*s or $10. That 
means $100 or less for a two-week campaign." 

Shell Chemical confines its radio advertising to four agricul 
tural chemicals: Aldrin, Dieldrin, D-D and ammonia. The first 
two are new synthetic insect icid-s. I) |t is aimed at sulimicro 
SCOpiC pests. 

Ail Manager Keel says this about radio: ''It can command 
the' farmer's attention during certain periods when no other 
me. 1mm will work. Through research, we know these periods are 
in the early morning and during noontime. When the farmer 
is busy, he generally takes tim< out only to eat and listen to 
weather, market reports. 

Shell Chemical's time buying approach, therefore, is mow or 
fixed to one pattern two announcements per day during 
the week, one in the early morning and one around noon. Time- 
buyers look for adjacencies to newscasts, especially those con- 
taining weather and market reports. * * * 

\% hai*> happened since: With its products "oversold," Shell 
says it will us, little radio this year unless emergencies occur. 
In '53 there were radio campaigns for Aldrin. I> 1> and Dieldrin. 



46 



SPONSOR 







MINUTE RICE: RECIPE PROMOTIONS ON TV 



STRETCH IMPACT OF SHARED NETWORK SHOW 



ArticU appeared 30 November 1953 



Ten years ago, quick cooking Minute Rico was just a gleam 
in General Foods' corporate eye. 

Today, Minute Bice is a fast-selling, nationally distributed 
product backed by a SPONSOR-estimated $2 million ad campaign 
which includes shared sponsorship of two of tv's top network 
programs— Bob Hope (NBC TV) and Mama (CBS TV)— maga 
zinc color spreads {Life, Satevepost, women's magazines) and 
extensive point-of-purchase material. 

All of General Foods' leading competitors in the sl05 million 
annual (U. S. consumption at retail level) rice business admit 
that Minute Rice ranks in the top three in sales and is the 
most advertised rice brand on the market today. 

Here's how the Minute Rice ad campaign shaped up: 

In 1946 General Foods' marketing experts selected Atlanta 
and Philadelphia as the first targets for Minute Rice. Local ad 
drives in these markets were spearheaded by radio announce 
nients and newspaper insertions via Young & Rubicam. 

January 1949 marked an advertising landmark in the growth 
of Minute Rice. The product reached a sufficiently advanced 
state of distribution to warrant a switch to national-level ad 
media. On the air, Minute Rice began to share sponsorship 
i with other GF products) of Second Mrs. Burton, a radio daj 
time serial. 

In 1951 television was reaching stature as a full-fledged ad- 
vertising medium. Early in 1951, GF added Minute Rice hitch- 
hikes to the afternoon tv Bert Parks show (NBC TV), concen- 



trating on visual demonstrations of Minuti .cook 

qualities. 

Wiih producl sales 3till climbing the next year, Minuti Bic< 
stepped up its t\, radio and magazine expenditures, passing 
the si ,000,11(10 annually mark. The tv approach was shifted to 
an evening show, and .Minute Rice became one of the featured 
GF products on Mama (CBS T\ , Hitchhikes tor Minul 

uei,- added to the nighttime radio Hub Ilo/>> Sim,, 

Radio). 

In the first halt' oi I'- 1 '-; Minute Bice continued to be featured 
on Mama, and advertised heavily in magazines and newspapers. 

(SPONSOR estimates that ii. this January through .lunc period, 
GF spent about soihhiOii gloss in tv, and about the same amount 

in magazine .md newspaper ads.) 

Later on in the year. Minute Rice's advertising emphasis 
shifted even more strongh in favor of big-time tv. Minute Bice, 
as mentioned earlier, was an alternate week sponsoi of \fama, 
seen Friday nights on CBS TV. But much of the Minute Rice 
air effort was concentrated on the monthly Bob Worn show, Been 
once a month on Tuesday nights on NBC TV. 

GF has evolved a system for making the high-priced impact 
of network tv last and last. The secret: periodic recipe promo- 
tions which are featured on tv and then plugged heavily at 
point-of-sale and in print. * + * 

What's happened since: The sponsor is now taking a summer 
hiatus, plans to return to Hob Ho»< and Mama in the fall. 




BORDEN; DETAILED RESEARCH IN EACH MARKET 
INFLUENCES LOCAL RADIO PERSONALITY BUYS 

Article appeared 29 June 1953 



The Borden Co. 's air media buying primers are stacks of 
' ' target folders ' ' loaded with vital information pertaining to the 
radio and tv habits of people who live in major TJ. S. markets. 

In 1953 Borden spent every nickel of its $2,350,000 air budget 
($1.6 million for spot tv, $750,000 for spot radio) on the basis 
of these ' ' target folders, ' ' or " blue books. ' ' 

Borden lays out its air media plans on the basis of distribu 
tion of its products in specific territories. Each market is treated 
as a separate entity and many factors are considered in planning. 

It uses three agencies: Young & Rubicam, New York; Tracy 
Locke Co., Dallas; Griffith-McCarthy, St. Petersburg. In L953 
only one of its divisions, the Food Products Co., was sponsoring 
a network show: Treasury Men in Action on 43 NBC TV outlets. 

Here are some tips on buying local radio time from William 
B. Campbell, Borden 's assistant advertising manager in charge 
of radio-tv, gathered from practical experience and on the basis 
of extensive research contained in the bluebooks : 

1. Decide what audience should be reached. Establish age 
level of best prospects so you can program to reach them. 

2. Determine what time of day you can best reach prospects. 

3. Determine if you want large tumour. Do you want to hit 
a limited but loyal audience at the same time each day several 
days of the week; a larger number of people at the same time 
several times a day several days of the week ; still more people 
with spots at varying times during the week? 

4. Analyze the various stations' programing. Which has greater 



share of audience? Programing usually reflects management. 

5. Try to buy best local radio personalities. You're going 
local, and you want your advertising to have strong local ap] 

6. Explain strategy to local p< rsonality. Knowledge of prod- 
uct, strategy by local personality will make messages convincing. 

7. Know your local station management personally. Show 
station how it can help merchandise program. 

8. Advise local managers of air strategy. 

9. Constantly reevaluate programing. Know what compel 

is doing in the market. Constantly reevaluate your commercials 
and programing to insure they're doing best job fur products. 

To achieve its aims Borden airs approximately 11,001 
mercials on 50 tv stations and over lnii.iiini commercials on 162 
radio outlets annually. In radio Borden leans heavily on the 
leading local female personality who has won acceptance with 
a hard core of housi wives in the area. 

Campbell's research bluebooks are updated at least oi 
year and always include data from previous examinations of the 
same market for comparison purposes. Campbell says, "With 
the aid of these analyses we can spot a trend in a hurry." * * * 
What's happened since: Today Borden is continuing its heavy 
use of spot radio in about 130 cities (160 Its primary 

tv effort consists of a network show, Justice, over : XBC TV 
stations. Spot tv is used only in key cities which do not get 
the network show. The Food Products Div. is now considering 
buying into the Garry Moore Show, daytime CBS TV program. 



12 JULY 1954 



47 




MOGEN DAVID: PSYCHIATRY AND TELEVISION 
CREATE "PHENOMENAL" SALES RISE FOR WINE 



limit appeared 26 January 1953 



Television and psychiatry have helped build a sacra 
i u inc into a leading table « ine in t 

n David has swept to the top among Bweel Concord 
a manj markets across the country. In fact " 
.r i in, a calls it probably tin 

brand in 1\ s. wine history. Agency: Weiss & Geller. 
I hi 1953 budg round - 1. 1 million (up $100,00 

10, I in t\. $350,000 for radio. 

The Wine Corp.'s first tv Bhow, ( on I m Fop This . ABC TV, 
ran on about 15 2l in 1950. 

tsl According to Marvin Mann, Weiss' v .p.. direct 
radio -ft and Mogen David account director: 
'"I'ln in immediate sales response to t\ thai hadn't 

• m the other media. We knew then we were going 

concentrat ft as long as it brought such results." 

firm's second ft show, Charlu Wild, Detective, on LBC 

TV and I'ii .Mont, Mann says "Proved conclusivelj Mogen David 

aged "ii tv. With proper ael and show, they could effectively 

large-scale tv operation. For example, we offered a wine 

recipe i k free. Requests ran to 2,000 a week, A Burvey showed 

thi ■ 87' of the people who had written to requesl the liook 
liatelj bought Mogen David." 
Starting 2 September 1952 Mogen David began spons 
When Was I. a panel shew on :',!• Du Mont stations. 



And Benry Markus Bays of t\. "We're sohl on television 
because we can Bhow the product and talk about it at the same 
time. This \ i - n:i 1 and a mpact makes it twice as effective 

ether medium." 

II. i« does psychiatry enter into Belling Mogen David 
Weiss i,a> been interested in the Bubject since he majored in 
sociology at the University of Chicago (Ph.B., V.^l- . Sis 
.v lias made an intensive Btudy of how socia can 

help advertisers uncover consumers' real feelings. 

II. says of Mogen David, "It - - a sweet Concord grape wine 
with Bugar added and onlj I)'- alcohol by volume. It's differ- 
ent from the regular California and French imported wines. 

•■First we consulted the social scientists and from them came 
man;, ideas, but there was one in particular that stood out in 

almost i \ei > disi ussion we had. 

"One psycholof - related to festive childhood 

memories, to early family closeness and gaiety.' 

"W( quickly realized the copy themes that would set this 
mood would have to be a doorway to the pleasant world of 
yesterday. Among the themes that embody this idea: 'A I 

Of the g 1 Old days.' " • • • 

What's happened since: Mogen David has been sponsoring 
Dollar .1 Second over Du Mont (93 stations). Next season the 
show is moving to ABC TV, with a 130 station lineup. 




SEARS, ROEBUCK: RADIO HELPS SELL MEN 
IN MORNING, WOMEN IN AFTERNOON 



Artich appeared 23 February 1953 



The myth that radio can't do a good, consistent job of selling 

for d lias been exploded many times but m 

with a louder bang than in Tucson, Ariz. 

The Sears, Roebuck store in that city has been doing an 
effective job with radio selling for nearly Beven years. 

The Tucson Sears manager, Edward B. Carmack, Bays: 

important as an adver 

diun I'- effectiveness, though, depends largely on 
programing and presentation. Radio should look in the 

mirror to see why they are nol selling more time to depart 

inelit 

This s Si rs' over all air - 

1. An early-morning 8:15 to 9:00 show called 15 Minutes 

from Broadway on KM' 1 sic from Broadwaj 
seven daj - a week. 

l'. A la - show entitled Arizona 

Hayridi on IO \ \. Run by dis Bob McKeehan, it is 
on five days a week, combines Western-hillbilly music with 

folks} chatter. 

Special sale announcements using all five TuCSOH stations. 
The morning show is an excellent exam; •■■. a radio 

station can do an imaginative job in programing. The program 
[TUC's genei i aager 1 mself, Lee Little. 
Little handles tin program with an informal touch. II- 

dvertising material from Ralph Knapp. Sear's ad 
manager, i>ut ail liKs around it. it hi Bees an unusual item in 



the mass-market store (recently it was mink coats . he'll add a 

about it. 

Carmack considers this type of programing unusual for a 

morning Bhow, si in bis experience. But he feels that it 

- the purposi of bringing into the store a type of customer 

— such a- professional men who might otherwise have Di 

ome acquainted with the Sears line oi 

[f the morning Bhcw is tops in selling hard goods to men. the 
n show excels in selling other types of merchandisi 

M.K.ehan is a well known di-k jockey in the To 
ana. He makes persona] appearances with his own band in 
Ki \ \ 'si - /one and bro Saturday night dame. 

Sears ts daily air impact with announcement 

al events. These announcements sometimes run up to 
a day tor three or four-day periods. In addition to KTUC 
and K< \ \. ■ KOPO, KTKT and KVOA for I 

special events. 

Carmack sa.xs that dollar for dollar a sustained program will 
usually bring in more results than announcement-.. Hut he finds 
the occasional jabbing of a promotional needle necessary for 

-IlltS. * * * 

What's happened since: '■ Sears store is new in its 

fifth ■ oad- 

linn over KTUC. It is also si sing over 

Ki \ \ The two shows constitute backbone of its air ad\ertis- 
ing, although announcements are -till us special events. 



48 



SPONSOR 




APPLIANCES: POLITICAL CONVENTIONS GIVE 
CONCENTRATED PROMOTION, SPARK SALES 

Article appeared 12 January 1953 



Admen rank as one of the greatest concentrated promotion 
campaigns in recent times the radio-tv sponsorship of the 1952 
Presidential conventions and Election Night returns by three 
big appliance firms — Admiral, Philco and Westinghouse. 

Great interest has been evinced in the advertising field as to 
what could have been the results from this campaign in terms 
of (1) sales and (2) audiences garnered by this incomparably 
expensive tie-up with public interest programing (it cost the 
sponsors and networks involved about $12 million), sponsor 
explored both these facets and here are the highlights of wli.it 
lias been discovered: 

1. Sales: The three-network sponsorship not only sparked 
sales in a big way for the three companies but it served to 
lift the entire appliance industry as a whole out of its customary 
summer slump. 

2. Promotion: The three firms agree that they got a brand 
identity impact which will endure for a long time. 

3. Audience: Nine out of every 10 radio and tv homes tuned 
in to the conventions at one time or another. Tv viewing was 
greater in terms of gross home-hours than radio listening. On 
the average, tv sets were tuned in to the conventions for three 
hours a day; radio only homes were tuned in for approximately 
half that time. 

Betrospeetion: The appliance trio think it was astute of them 
to pick up the full tab on their respective networks for both 
convention and election returns coverage rather than to have 



let other ad m them in participation sponsorship. 

Report on sales: Probably the outstanding sales result of the 
conventions was the effect on tin- norma] summei Blump in ap 
pliance sales. There wasn't any. Westinghouse Account Bxecu 
five I'.ill Bitenbaugh of Ketchum, MacLeod ami Grove told 
sponsor flatly that this "can be accredited to thi tremendous 
political campaign package." 

What was learned? Looking back on the convention, the 
sponsors feel that the selling job was properly handled and 
effective. They don't consider that the commercial intruded 
and point out that, although a broad. allowed 10% 

of program time for commercials, mm ore than 

half of the allotted time quota. 

There was no difference in the basic commercial approach 
between the two conventions. There was a real effort made to 
get more variety, however, into the Democratic Convention com 
mercials. Philco, which put 11% of its t\ commercials on film, 
made up 42 different commercial films for the conventions. Be- 
cause all stations weren't interconnected, it was necessary to 
make 777 prints, the Iargesl single tv print order up to that 
time. 

With its 24 products advertised during the con West 

inghouse used 28 different live commi rcials with Betty I'urness 
plus 26 different flip card commercials. Ada Lral sought variety 
by indoctrinating announcers in Admiral sales lore and then 
letting them speak extemporaneously. * * • 




NATIONAL SHOES: 100% RADIO EFFORT 
DOUBLES SHOE SALES, BUILDS IDENTIFICATION 

Article appeared 21 September 1953 



' ' National Shoes ring the bell ! ' ' has been sung over the 
radio stations in Greater New York hundreds of times each 
week since 1940. It is the jingle that has helped double the 
number of National Shoe stores and multiplied the Eastern 
retail chain 's sales volume almost five times in the past 14 years. 

In 1940 when the Emil Mogul Co., Inc., took over the National 
Shoe stores account, this chain of retail shoe stores was a print- 
media-only advertiser. At the agency's recommendation Na- 
tional Shoes put 100% of its advertising budget into radio. 

National Shoes' answer to its need for frequent impact on 
a large family audience is a combination of popular local music 
programing and a heavy schedule of announcements throughout 
the day. In 1953 its radio lineup included six New York sta- 
tions: WNEW, WINS, WMCA, WOV, WHOM and WWRL. 

National Shoes' program buys are invariably 10- and 15- 
minute segments of popular local d.j. programs. 

On foreign-language and Negro programing blocks, National 
Shoes sticks to the 15-minute musical show. 

National's announcements are scheduled seasonably, with the 
heaviest concentrations during spring and fall. 

National's '53 fall spot schedule in New York included 20 to 
40 announcements weekly on each of its six stations and 50 to 60 
musical programs a week (either 10- or 15-minute), on three 
of these stations. 

Most memorable line of National's jingle has been the refrain 

"National Shoes ring the bell" — which has become identified 

12 JULY 1954 



with the retail chain through constant repetition. 

During the past six years National Shoe announcements have 
also been heard in Italian, Spanish, German, Czech and Polish. 

National Shoes' 1953 ad budget is "in the middle six fig- 
ures." In terms of the various media, here's approximately how 
this money is bemg spent: 67% for radio, 23% for tv, 10% 
for newspapers. 

Since February 1950 National Shoes (through Emil Mogul 
Co.) has been sponsoring Time for Adventure, WNBT, New 
York, Sundays 10:00-10:30 a.m. This program, produced by 
Productions for Television, a Mogul subsidiary, features chil- 
dren's serial films, like The Lost Jungle, as well as a prize 
giveaway to members of National's Adventure Club. 

The Emil Mogul agency keeps close tabs on the efficiency of 
its radio schedule by conducting regular media tests for the 
account in the form of write-in discount offers. By comparing 
the response pulled by one particular announcement either with 
their computed average expectancy or past performance in that 
time segment, Mogul agency decides whether to keep a par- 
ticular time or drop it. ■*•**• 
What's happened since: National has expanded its radio an- 
nouncement schedule to 13 New York, New Jersey, Connecticut 
and Massachusetts markets in addition to its New York City 
radio schedule. Emil Mogul buys on a 52-week basis in the 13 
new markets as well, though schedules are heavier before holi- 
days. Its tv show, Time for Adventure, continues over WNBT. 



49 



Now for the first time . . . 
here are the vital facts on 



ytime profile 



It's the first nationwide survey of Daytime TV audiences . . . 
and it's ready for you now. 

IF YOU SELL... 

soaps, soups, cereals, cars, cigarettes, appliances, packaged desserts, 
home permanents, home repairs or almost any other product ..." 

YOU'LL FIND DAYTIME TVVIEWERS ARE YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS! 

Here are the highlights of some of the findings: 

Two out of every three TV homes are daytime homes. 

Daytime viewers are younger. 

Daytime families are larger. 

More daytime families have children. 

Daytime families have larger incomes. 

Daytime families spend more for almost all products. 

For example, compared to non-daytime viewers, they buy 17 % more 
laundry soaps and detergents . . . 307o more shampoos . . . 377 more packaged 
desserts . . . 68% more new automobiles! 

You just tell us what you want to sell, and we can show you 
the facts on the best customers for your products and the most effective 
programs to reach the greatest number of active buyers. Your local 
NBC representative has the complete story. Call him today. 



J§0 



TELEVISION 

a service of Radio Corporation of America 




SI mtifflp if top 

Chart covcrr halt-hour syndicated film 



v 





Past* 

rank 


■■»• 


















•taa* 


Top 10 ihows in 10 or more markets 
Period 1-7 Moy 1954 

TITLE. SYNOICATOR. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 


Avenge 

rating 


7STATI0N 
MARKETS 


4-STATI0N MARKETS 


3-STATI0N It, 




NY I A 


Boston 


Chi. 


Mo Is. Seattle 


St L. 


Wash. 


Atlanta Bait. Buftal C 


I 


I 


1 Led Three lives. Ziv (D) 


25.9 


14.0 8.5 


79.8 

wnac-tr 


77.9 


27.3 74.8 

- 


42.5 


9.2 


6.5 78.8 54. ( 2 

"l« i «bal tv ii.n.tL, 


2 


2 


Favorite Story, Ziv (D) 


22.1 


72.0 10.9 




74.5 
9:30pm 


25.5 22.8 


43.5 


77.7 


74.0 

g 


3 


7 


Badge 714, NBC Film (D) 


20. .! 


70.2 27.0 

kttv 


76 3 


75.7 

wgn-tv 
8:00pm 


24.8 28.5 

kin.- iv 

- 




24.5 


76.3 75.3 

wbal tv L. 
i 10:30pm 


4 


1 


Cisco Kirf. Ziv (W) 


20.2 


7 7.9 72.9 


75.8 

h :30pm 


77 4 

«l»kb 
5 Mp i 


79.5 27.3 

i 




72 7 
wnbw 


7 7.3 73.0 38.cE 

waga-tv wbal-tr uhrti L> 

: "..j. m : oopiEhi 


.7 


Jlr. District Attorney, Ziv (a) 


19.3 


8.4 6.9 


78 3 


72.5 

»bkb 


79.5 76.5 




7.7 

wmal-tv 


73.8 77.5 


6 


S 


City Defective.. MCA, Revue Prod. (D) 


19.2 


4.0 14.4 

upix 


20.5 


5.4 

« bkb 
S :30pm 


23.8 73.0 

weeo-tv kine-tv 
9:00pm 




9.2 


8.3 

wmartv » t - 
11:00pm 


6 


3 


Kit Carson. MCA, Revue Prod. (W) 


lit. 2 


74.5 

kabc-tr 
7:30pm 


75.8 

6:00pm 




24.0 

king tv 


31.0 




7 7.8 73.3 25.. 

whr-a trmar-tr ibn i 
5:00pm 6:00pm 3 OOp 


8 


1 


Superman, Flamingo, R. Maxwell (K) 


18.7 


74.0 72.7 

knit 




73.5 

wbkb 


9.3 22.8 

klnc tv 
5:00pm 


30.0 


72.5 


76.8 74.5 39.» 

wbal-te uben- tax 
7 :00pm 7 :00pm 7 :00p< ■ 


» 




Lioerace. Guild Films (Mu.) 


/.'( / 


5.2 70.0 

kcop 
7:30pm 7:30pm 




73.5 

»Rn-tv 
9:30pm 


25.3 23.3 

klnK-lv 
8:30pm 


26.3 


6.9 

9 :30pm 


6.5 74.8 4. Ui 

w.tr-t »b»l-tr vrbuf- ■■ 
7:30pm lo 30pm 6 00p ■ 


10 


8 


Foreign Intrigue. JWT, Shel. Reynolds (a) 


18.2 


77.9 7.5 

ivnbt 
10:30pm 


24.5 




20.3 75.3 

8:30pm 8:00pm 




76.0 

10:30pm 


76.0 7 

» aea - tr 

1" WITH 


Rank 


Part* 

rank 


Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 


















I 


1 


Craig Kennedy. L. Weiss, A. Weiss (M) 


19.2 


2.5 

khj-tv 
7:30pm 














2 


2 


\ icfory at Sea. NBC Film (Doc.) 


it. n 


8.2 

knbh 
10:30pm 








Inner Sanctum. NBC Film (D) 


17.8 


4.0 6.4 

kttT 
9 :00pm 




77.7 

unbq 
10:00pm 


8.8 22.5 

wtrn-tv 1 
10:00pm 9:0Opm 








:t 


i 


6 


Captured. NBC Film (D) 


16.1 


4.7 7.9 

km 
9:30pm • 




7.9 

upn-tv 
7 :30pm 


79.0 

klnc-tv 

• 






43. 


.» 


Heart of the CUy, UTP, Gross-Krasne (D) 


16.0 


4.9 


73.0 

« rr. i ■ 




6 


It 


/linos 'n' An du. CBS Film (C) 


15.0 


77.7 79.0 

knit 
10:30pm S:00pm 


78.0 




22.0 

komotv 

i 


7.8 


70.9 

7:00pm 






Cotrboy f»-T»Icn. Flamingo. H. B. Donovan (W) 


1 1.5 


2.4 

w-abr-tv 






74 


30.0 






7 


7 




Joe f'ufoofca .S'lory. Guild Films (A) 


f /.I 


4.5 3.7 






72 3 




7 7.5 

%\r,b*v 

7:00pm 


27 

wbaa 


8 


«> 




ft <>«/.(/ tones, United Tv, Roland Reed (A) 


12.1 


8.2 5.8 

wnbt 

1 




70.0 

wbkb 
5:30pm 


70.8 75.3 

weeo-tv klnr-tv 
1 2 :30pm ■ 








u 






>ly Hero. Official Films, Don Sharpe (D) 


10.6 


3.5 70.41 

1 






78 5 

king tv 


5.0 

8:30pm 






19 



























- 

muilral; (\V) Western- Film? lined ire irndlcated. half hour length, 
broadcast In (our ur more markets. The average rating Is an unweighted average of individual 



1 bove. Blank space Imllralet film n.* broa-lcast 
1951 Will* network shows are fairly stable from one month to 
i they are shown, this Is Uue to much lrsaer extent with 



do tar tv 



r.:.- 



fATION MARKETS 




liorttn Pttr oit Mllw'kee Phlla. S. Fran. 

*j".5 J9.5 42.3 77.5 22.3 

■ wink tv wtmj-tv wcau-tv kron-tv 

, 8 30pm 7: I 10:30pm 



76.3 

ujl.k iv 



98 

kgo-tv 
7:00pm 



.0 20.3 75.5 76.2 28.5 



wwj-ti wcan-tv wcau-tv knix 
in OOpra 9 30pm 6:30pm 0:00pm 



2-STATION MARKETS 



Birm. Charlotte New O. 



30.5 56.8 50.0 



u abt 

v 30i in 



wbtv wdsu tv 
9:0 ii 9:30pm 



57.5 49.7 



\\lllV 

■< 30pm 



wdsu-tv 

9 :30pm 



54.0 75.0 



uhtv 
9 :00pm 



Wil-ll Iv 

11:30pm 



77.0 32.8 77.9 25.0 

mm iv wimi t\ wrau-tv kron-tv 
I 30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



26.3 27.0 



\\M\ 

10:30pm 



wdsu iv 
5:00pm 



75.3 37.5 6.9 72.0 






ran iv wtmj-tv wptz kron-tv 
9 :30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 



7 74.5 



3 
If 



ujl>k iv 
:i :30pm 



72.5 

\ijl>k l> 



74.9 76.5 

wptz kron-tv 
6:30pm 4:00pm 



77.5 26.5 27.2 75.5 



»nMv wtmj-tv wcau-tv 
5 :30pm I 0»|)m 7:00pm 



kgo-tv 
ii :30pm 



'10 79.5 42.5 70.2 2 7.0 



IV 

-I 111 



wjlik-iv wtmj-tv wptz kpix 
9 :30pm 7:00pm 11:00pm 9:30pm 



73.0 

wjbk-tv 
8:00pm 



70.9 9.3 

wcau-tv kgo-tv 
10:30pm 10:00pm 



25.0 57.5 43.0 



wabt 

s ::n,.m 



wbti 
7 :00pm 



wdsu ti 
7 OOpm 



56.7 

wbtv 

8:30pm 



78.5 35.0 



wabt 

i 'in 



wbtv 
5:30pm 



79.8 33.8 25.5 



wabt 

:30pm 



wbtv 
5 :30pm 



wdsu-tv 
5:00pm 



28.0 

wabt 
9:00pm 



48.3 

UllMl IV 

9:30pm 



28.8 

wbrc-tv 

8:30pm 



49.0 

wdsu-tv 
9:30pm 





73.3 5.8 

wcau-tv kgo-tv 
6:00pm 10:00pm 


55.0 

tvdsu tv 
8:30pm 


40.3 72.4 

wtmj-tv wfil-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 




77.3 79.3 

wcan-tv kron-tv 
7:3Upui 8:30pm 


52.3 

wdsu-tv 
9 :30pm 




6.9 

vvfil-tV 

7:00pm 




4.5 76.8 

.\u/, tv kron-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


42.0 

wdsu-tv 

10:00pm 




75.7 

kpix 
7:30pm 




70.3 '0.2 

wjbk-tv keo-tv 
12:30pm 6:00pm 






36.0 7 7.3 

wtmj-tv kpix 
5:00pm 5:00pm 






76.8 22.5 70.0 

wvvz-tv wtmj-tv kron-tv 
5:30pm 10:30pm 5:00pm 




4 

lie 

:1 


77.5 

kgo-tv 
1 10:00pm 





f„ ' ne 1" minrt when analyzing rating trends from one month to 
■/.in is chart -Refers to last month's chart. If blank, show was 
ill In last chart or was in other than top 10 



WMIN-TV gets RESULTS! 




fVr 







AAAA 
WW 



. . . "From 3373 cases to 766.'! U a terrific in< rease 
for Squirt in the month of March which is certainK 
not ideal beverage weather in Minnesota. We must 
admit that most of this was due to our program on 
WMIN-TV. Results were almost immediate' 

Kenneth C. Carlson 

President 

Whistle Bottling Company 



. . . "Record breaking crowds in our 9 stores on tin 
Monday following our first TV show have to be 
attributed almost entirely to your station. We cer- 
tainly appreciate your 'above and beyond the call 
of duty' cooperation in promoting the first of our 
regular weekly Red Owl Theaters." 

"Mike" McMahon 
Advertising Manager 
Red Owl 



. . . "Over 200 people packed the lot the day after 
our 2nd showing of the Charlie Chan Theatre. 
Because they were there specifically to see our 10 
TV Car Specials we had fast and certain proof of 
WMIN-TV's effectiveness." 

Hess Kline 

President 

Kline Oldsmobile 



. . . "The biggest year in our history looms as our 
sales have more than doubled as a direct result of 
the Perma-Glass Weather Show on WMIN-TV." 
Larry Swanson 

Sales Manager of the A. O. Smith Dept. 

of the R. R. Howell Co. 



. . . "Our 150 % May sales increase is due in great 
part to your Captain ll's sincere way of handling 
commercials. We want you to know that we appre- 
ciate the genuine appeal that you are developing 
among the children for Bosco." 

S. N. Bearman 

President 

S. N. Bearman Brokerage Co. 



... "I can say without exaggeration that the cam- 
paign that we are now using for Dox Toothpaste on 
your Captain Eleven Series has been the most suc- 
cessful of anything we have tried on television so 
far. WMIN-TV will be given an increased share 
of our coming advertising budget." 

C. W. Zaum 

Secretary 

Dox Company. Inc. 



jy Mlri 

Channel 11 



MINNEAPOLIS — ST. PAUL, MINN. 



REPRESENTATIVE 



BLAIR 



DRUG STORE 



TOOL 






SPONSOR Save Drugstores AGENCY: Mark Schreibei 

l \pm l l ( VS1 HISTORY The sponsor, a chain of In 

drug stores, bought a one-minute participation on 
U ednesdo) nights, in offer of garden hose on 21 tpril 
ni $2.49 foi 50 feet and of soil soakers for 99c was tele' 
cast. "The fantastic sales w«m is this." Mark Schreibei 
said, "hoi an expenditure of $79.50, the stores had <i 

dollui volume of more than $2,000 in retail sales on these 

items, \atuialh . u ith this html of stoi \ . n e have requested 

iii/i/itional commercials on \< adcnn Theatre."' 



k<>\ TV, Denvt 



PROGR Wl: \<a ( |.-,m Theatre 



TV 

results 



SPONSOR: (.rani Tool < ... AGENCY: Arthur M(-yerhofI& . 

I \l-l LE I \SE HISTORY: The sponsor bought a fi\ 
minute program at sign-off on Saturday nights. In 
weeks 2,510 orders were pulled by the program; e<t 
order was for an item costing SI. 98. Every time 
program mis telecast an average of 418 orders i 
received: each program cost SI 25. Thus sales amoun.' 
to about seven times the advertising cost. The sponsor 
first renewed for three weeks, renewed again for six u>- 
and then renewed again for 13 weeks. 



\\BT\. Charlotte 



PROGR WI: Gay Bla 



GARAGE DOOR OPENED 






SPONSOR: Wizard Mfg. I o. \«.IM *i I' 

< VPSl I I < W! HISTORY : /„ the very early morm 
I 12:45 a.m. I one day recently, the If izard Manufa* 
Co. advertised its radio-controlled garage door on Ja« 
sou's Theatre. As a result of the one announcement, 
of the radio-controlled door openers, or $3,000 worth 
sales, were made at an expenditure of $150. The coi 
reported the results from the one announcement on A 
surpassed their expectations based on previous < 



k.TT\ . Los Angeles 



PROCRXM: \nnouncem. 



SEWING MACHINES 



RUBBER SHOP 



SPONSOR: Rodney, be. VGENCY: Direcl 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After six months on 
WKOY-TV , the sponsor wrote to the station and said 
that "our costs (on W()k\ -77 i have been brought down 
lower than costs of other media. . . . I also have found 
that my closures are very high . . . For a $500 expenditure 
we did $10,000 worth of seuing machine business. It 
has perked up our sales organization. . . . We are very 
pleased with your station and hope to continue without 
interruption for years to come . . ." 



WOKY T\. Milwaukee 



PROORAM: Announcements 



VACATION BOOKLET 



SPONSOR: N. Y. State Dept. of Commerce AGENCY: HRI>o 

I M'M I I < W HISTORY : The V. Y. State Department 

ni ( ommerce recently scheduled jour five-minute pro- 
grams about vacationing in \eu )oik on Tuesdays, 
6:40 p.m. following Time <MT for Sports with Bill Hem- 
ming. Ajtei onh three programs. 1.777 requests for the 
booklet were received. This uas at a cost of 50c pet 
booklet request, which uas fai lower than the sponsor 
hud anticipated. Following the success of the program 
the Department of Commerce has increased its original 
order of four programs tn L2. 



\\ \\ I I V, I 



I'KtH.K \\l: Travel fil. 



SPONSOR: OK Rubber Welders Store VGENCY: Dip 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : Television forced thii 
out of business for 00 days — in order to remodel o 
expand! The sponsor wanted to reach farm and 
trial workers and bought one one-minute participaii 
announcement weekly on Saturday Jamboree, roi 
between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. At the end of the n 
month OK's business uas up from $900 a month 
- 1,300 a month and has remained at this level ever sin< 
(*ost of the participations is $25. 

WROM, Rome, Ga. PROGRAM: I'artiripitki 



HOT DOGS 



SPONSOR: Pegwill Packing Co. VG1 NI ' 

i VPS1 I I I US] HISTORY : II estcrn feature films on 
are helping sell 18,000 pounds of hot dogs week ■ 
Pegwill fucking Co., Springfield. III. The firm sfxmso 
Western Round-up across-the-board at 5:00 p.m. o: 
II ICS. During the first five weeks of the sir 
jumped 58' ; and PegwilTs hot dogs are now selling^ 
the rate of 18,000 pounds weekly. If ICS personal^ 
"Pegwill Pete" holds a weekly party for area young*" 
with children submitting drawings to qualify for attm 
once. The first week Pete received 1.100 drawings. 



\\ [< S, Springfield, III. 



PROGR \M: Western Roa»* 





...operating with a full 316,000 watts, 

for availabilities see the boiling company 
wish-tv is owned and operated by 

universal broadcasting company, inc. 

1440 north meridian street 



I N 



12 JULY 1954 



55 




«i forum on ouexfion* of c urre nt interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



\\ hai are the radio and television trends thttt 
advertisers slum hi look »nt for in the fall 




THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

FOUR MAJOR CHANCES 

By Arthur S. Pardoll 

Director, Broadcast Mvd'm 
Foote, Cone & Belding, New York 

The next year in 
radio and televi- 
sion is going to 
continue to be a 
season of 
< hanges, and 
these will be as 
dramatic as they 
have been in the 
past. The changes 
will affect main phases of the broad- 
cast field, but we see four areas where 
the changes will be quite important. 

One will be a re-examination of the 
value of radio as an advertising me- 
dium in terms of the largely un- 
measured audience outside of the liv- 
ing room and out of the home. More 
emphasis will be given to special op- 
portunities offered by selective buying 
of radio stations, programs and time 
periods least influenced by television 
inroads. 

SecomlU. further expansion of day- 
time television programing will in- 
clude new serials. In addition to 
increased activit) on the part of ad- 
\ertisers, there will be new ways of 
buying daytime as well as evening 
|t]i\ ision. 

Thirdly, it is expected that the big 
question of uhf will be more clearlv 
n'.-ol\ed. We anticipate a growing ac- 
ceptance of ultra-high frequency sta- 
tion- in those situations where condi- 
tions are favorable. 

Finally, the public's interest in color 
telecasting ma) 1"- intensified 1>\ rea- 
sonable prices for color Bets. Because 
of the unique values provided b) color. 



56 




this medium will be especiallv attrac- 
tive to those advertisers whose prod- 
ucts and programs can benefit from 
its use. 



IN TV— WATCH FOR COLOR 

By Sylvester L. Weaver Jr. 
President, National Broadcasting Co. 

One predominant 

trend in tele- 
vision that an) 
alert advertiser 
should watch in 
the fall is the 
trend to color. 

\< tuallv. if the 
advertiser just 
watches and does 
not do anything about it, he won't be 
verv alert and he'll wind up missing 
the boat. For color tv is here, ready 
to go to work for the sponsor inter- 
ested in protecting and expanding his 
share of the market. 

Make no mistake about it, the color 
television campaign is going to deter- 
mine the share-of-market of most con- 
sumer goods in color tv homes — and 
this trend will start within this coming 
year. To the company requiring effec- 
tive advertising to survive, to the 
compan) whose position demands that 
it lead the wav or suffer loss of pres- 
tige, to the company interested in re- 
capturing a sales leadership that might 
have slipped out of its hands, to the 
compan) looking for a wa\ to arouse 
a new excitemenl throughout its over- 
all organization — the trend is to color 
television and the time to start in color 
is this fall 

Another significant trend in the 
fall will be the increased use of day- 
time t\. \nd with excellent reason. \ 
i rent nationwide stud\ released b\ 




the NBC Research Department shows 
the daytime viewer to be a prime tar- 
get for an\ advertiser — younger, with 

larger families, higher income, a big- 
ger buyer — in short, a better customer. 



CUMULATION CONCEPT GAINING 
By Adrian Murphy 

President, CBS Radii). Neu York 

Some of the 
trends that 
should become 
increasingly im- 
portant in the 
next few months: 

1 . More ad- 
vertiser-, we 
think, will be- 
come more keen- 
ly aware of network radio's unique 
ability to cumulate big audiences, in 
many different ways: taking advantage 
of all the combinations afforded b) 
da) and night programs, multi-week 
strips, shared sponsorship and. of 
course, traditional nighttime showcase 
programs. 

2. More advertisers will recognize 
that radio is the only way to reach 
some 16.000.000 non-television fami- 
lies frequently, dependably and at low 
co-t. As a corollary, we expect adver- 
tisers to become increasingly aware of 
the high degree of duplication that ex- 
ists between the television and maga- 
zine (and Sunda) supplement i audi- 
ences. 

3. Evening network time costs to 
advertisers will be more attractive than 
ever before, and about 15 to 20 
lower than in the year just past. 

4. With new radio sets i ontinuing 
to sell at a faster-than-replaccment 
rate, homes with two or more sets will 
become increasingly important. New 

SPONSOR 






Nielsen data indicate, for example, that 
television homes with two radio sets 
do IV, more radio listening than tv 
homes with onlj one radio. And a 
third radio raises this figure to 64%. 
5. Finally, a new census of U.S. ra- 
dio and television sets I sponsored 
jointly bv the four radio networks and 
BAB) will give advertisers a much 
clearer picture of the number and im- 
portance of multi-set homes. And out 
of it should come a better understand- 
ing of radio's role as everyone's per- 
sonal entertainer and companion, day 
and night, in and out of the home. 



TREND TOWARD SPOT 

By D. H. Denenholz 

Research and Promotion Manager 
The Katz Agency, !Sew York 

There is one trend 
that is likely to 
be common to 
both radio and 
tv: the trend to- 
ward SPOT. 

In spot radio, 
you can expect an 
increase in the 
number and va- 
riety of "saturation" or multiple-an- 
nouncement plans. More and more 
stations are establishing such plans. 

Another radio trend is the extension 
of the successful news and music for- 
mula to nighttime programing. This 
programing trend coupled with the 
low-cost multiple-announcement plans 
will probably lead to increased in- 
terest in the attractive values that 
will be available, particularlv at night. 
In tv, there will be more multiple- 
station markets, with a consequent in- 
crease in competition for the adver- 
tiser's dollar. This, of course, will tend 
to reduce the clearance problems that 
have been plaguing many advertisers 
and also give more availabilities. 

Color tv development will accelerate. 
Nineteen-inch color receivers will prob- 
ably be available; several stations will 
be equipped to televise locally origi- 
nated color as well as network. Al- 
ready WMAR-TV in Baltimore has 
been televising slide commercials in 
color and WKY-TV in Oklahoma City 
is televising locally originated live 
color programs on a regular basis. 
Color film pickup equipment is an- 
other probable development. 

1 Please turn to page 263 I 






^BENJ 






is now basic 






CDS RADIO 






in Bujffalip 




in 


The mighty array of CBS talent plus the longtime 

top-rated local WBEN programs make WBEN more 

than ever THE buy in New York State's second market. 

Call or write any CHRISTAL office 
New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston or Detroit. 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S I'lOttee/l, RADIO STATION 



This is our 31st year of 
SOUND SELLING to Roanoke 
and Western Virginia 

% 26 County Coverage with a WEEKLY audience of 118,560 
families — a DAILY audisnce of 92,070 families. 

£ All week long, day or night, WDBJ'S share of tuned-in 
Roanoke audience averages 51 to 59°o. Average tune-in: 
7 a.m. to 8 p.m. — 24.9 r r; 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. — 19.4 

% About 25', of Virginia's Retail Sales are made in the 
WDBJ area. 

$ An affiliate of the CBS Radio Network for almost 25 years. 

May we recommend your product to our friends? 
Sources — A. C. Nielsen Co. and Pulse of Roanoke 



Established 1924 ■ CBS Since 1929 
AM • 5000 WATTS . 960 KC 
FM . 41,000 WATTS . 94.9 MC 

ROANOKE. VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS. INC., National Representatives 



12 JULY 1954 



57 





RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION CAMDEN. N.J. 




town's anniversary celebration marked ut \\ itt.it 



Ga\ '90's characters are operating 
some "I WKGB, Schenectady's L954 
tele< -ii>t iiiii equipment 1 1 i«-~i • da\-. Kea- 
ion for the costumes and beards is a 
riftieth anniversary celebration being 

neld in Scotia, a S< henei tad\ -uhurh. 



Scotia's mayoi said an) male citizen 
found without a beard fates a dunking 

in a wali-rin- tmugh. The ultimatum 
is taken seriousl) b) these crew mem- 
bers of the General Electric station 

i Im'Ium I . * * * 




WRGB cameramen living in Schenectady suburb had to wear beards — or face watery dunking 



H'fS'ff •!*«<• !»««/«* ojn-ninu' lor 

Indianapolis merchants who plan to 
open a new -tore are getting in the 
habit of calli ig V\ I-,!. I h ■ sta- 
tion offers a "package opening deal 
whicb it says pud- hundreds "I cus- 
tomers to the store- opening. 

The WISH "package opening 
on-the-scene program m.c.'d l»\ Reid 



stores druws customers 

Chapman, a \\ ISH di-k jockey. Chap- 
man, between recordings and plugs for 
the new store, conducts a scavenger 
hunt. Listeners are told that if the) 
bring certain items to the new store, 
the) will n< ri\ e .1 free -ill. The gim- 
mick draws people to the opening, 
converting mam into customers foi 




Reid Chapman, WISH m.c, conducts scavenger hunt al st 



60 



nmg, 



jraws crowds 



tin- new business as a result. 

One of Chapman's recent openings 
was lot a gasoline Btation. I In* owner 

said that more than half of the 

coming to colled theii scavenger hunt 
prizes had their tank- filled up. W ISH 
says thai Chapman manages to give 
awaj prizes at the rate of hetter than 
one a minute for periods of over three 

hours. 

Chapman'- -< aM-nuer hunt i- a copy- 

righted idea of his. The scavenger 
items usuall) are things easil) located. 
Prizes are bought bj the Btation from 
a prize concern, resold to the new re- 
tailer. So successful are the openings, 
reports \\ [SH, that police often ha\e 
to untangle the resulting trafln jams. 

• • • 

Detroit Ratlio-Tv Council 
polls viewers on tv nds 

Edward L. Bernays has been publi- 
cizing a Burve) he has made among 
senior class presidents of college- on 
their attitude- toward t\ commercials. 
According to Bernays, the respondents 
all di-like t\ advertising. 

Now the Detroit Radio & Television 
Council, using interviewers from Mich- 
igan State College and Wayne Univer- 
sity, i- conducting it- own Burvej of 
what people think about television ad- 
vertising. Somewhat wider in -cope 
than Bernays' effort, the Detroit -ur- 
\e\ will cover a scientifically selected 
sample of 7HH householders in Detroit 
ami Lansing. \ 22-question question- 
naire covers subjects ranging from 
people's activities when commercials 
appear on t\ screens to viewers' re- 
call of advertisers' programs. 

Detroit Radio \ Tv Council I're-i- 
dent \\ i 1 fit-Id L. lloltlen. radio-televi- 
-ion supervisor for I. Walter Thomp- 
son To. i Detroit I . -aitl the -ur\ i 
designed to do a thorough joh on tele- 
vision commercials and theii eff< 

"To the council's knowledge, no one 
has tested the effect of hard goods tv 
advertising," Eiolden told sponsor. 
"This stud) delves into that. \ml there 
an man) other facets to it. too. 
instance, we have been dismayed at 
the acceptance given various 'polls 
purporting to -how that nobod) pays 
anj attention to commercials, or that 
the) feel them childish, filled with un- 
truth-, or downright stupid. Inasmuch 
as we doubt the validit) of these much- 
publicized opinion-, the Council tie- 
. ided to do a thorough penetrating job 

SPONSOR 



using recognized research techniques." 
Survey Director David F. Miller. 
JWT research associate, summarized 
the findings of an advance tabulation 
of the first 100 returns. They are: 

1. Three out of four respondents 
could cite specific examples by sponsor 
name of "clever" tv commercials. 

2. More than half could name spe- 
cific commercials they felt were edu- 
cational, interesting or entertaining. 

3. Generally, people who totally 




One of 700 householders being interviewed 

condemn tv advertising are few and 
far between. 

4. Over half said most tv advertis- 
ing is too repetitious. Some felt com- 
mercials are too long, break programs' 
continuity. 

Major findings of the study will be 
published by SPONSOR this summer. 
Holden said that copies of the full re- 
port can be obtained by writing to the 
Council. 2130 Buhl Bldg., Detroit 26. 
There will be a $1 charge, he said, to 
offset tabulation and printing costs. 

• • • 

Syndlcatetl •slittr show 9 
running in 26 markets 

Brent Gunts is proving that even on 
tv, you don't necessarily have to have 
animation. Gunts, who is president of 
Brent Gunts Productions in Baltimore, 
told sponsor 26 tv stations are run- 
ning his Shadow Stumpers program. 
He says it is probably the only syndi- 
cated slide show in the country. 

The program, Gunts explains, is a 
game of guessing silhouette shadows 
of everyday, familiar objects. "The 
viewers see a shadow of an object on 
their screens," says Gunts, "and then 
guess what they think it is. Then a 
photograph of the object is shown. 
Many of the shadows look like one 
[Please turn to page 154 I 

12 JULY 1954 



10VALT 




Hzul.,ys$! 



? 

The plurality of listeners goes with WBNS — the sta- 
tion with greater tune-in than all other local stations 
combined ! As a candidate for your advertising dollar. 
WBNS presents a perfect platform with the 20 top- 
rated programs. 



CBS for CENTRAL OHIO 



IVillUr BlA,R 

I iroaio 



radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



61 



WHICH 




DO YOU LIKE? 

We're Got 
'em Alii 

CBS NBC ABC 
DUMONT 

Yes, for over a year, 
WAFB-TV has furnished 
the only TV programing 
to the rich BATON ROUGE 
TRADE AREA. This rich 
petro-chemical market 
responds to your sales 
messages over WAFB-TV 
because the viewers are 
among the highest paid 
workers in the country, 
with ample free time to 
spend their money as you 
tell them to! To cover 
almost a half million 
potential customers, buy 
the only TV station in the 
capital of Louisiana . . . 

WAFB-TV 

Channel 28 

Baton Rouge, La. 
TOM E. GIBBENS 

Vice President & General Manager. 
Represented nationally by 

ADAM J. YOUNG. Ji. 




(Continued from page 2*1 1 

determined b\ the depth of the phoniness and the breadth 
of the tv exposure given the offending campaign. 

Recently I clipped an advertisemenl from a leading maga- 
zine (I read them in barber shops since there are no ft seta 
there), half of which was devoted to a gentleman who had 
just "-witched", the copy claimed, to a competitor's product 
Having just finished devoting four year- to a product with 
which I am connected, I learned bv reading further that our 
man had discovered what true enjoyment was as a result of 
which he had rectified the error of his ways. 

Unles> we assume the entire public to be composed of utter 
idiots and completely unaware that pecuniary considerations 
are involved, this brand of switching and disloyalty must do 
a disservice to all advertising. 

Who is to blame? Well, all of u>. I guess. Our contract 
should have prohibited this tenuous relation. The new 
product should have enough decency as well as common sense 
not to attempt the transition. And. above all. the (so-called) 
talent should have enough integrity not to accept the new- 
money. 

This is one of those facets of bad taste which is also a 
facet of bad advertising. That such practices arc -ri-t for 
the noisy mills of the self-appointed critic- of advertising 
isn't important at all. At least in my opinion, it isn't 

What count- most is that we weaken every testimonial 
campaign by doing poor ones. And furthermore we spend 
dollars foolishly so thai they will reap nothing which hurt- 
all of us because it breeds doubting Thomases among those 
who have mi— pent the money. In a business so small as our-. 
that i- in one with so few people engaged in it (in contrast 
to manufacturing, publishing, etc.) we are bound to run 
into these folks who were once hurt as we go along in our 
business career-. When this happens, the right thing i- a lot 
harder to sell, for the lolk- who were burnt are a lot more 
-keptical about advertising than thej ordinarily would b< 
should be. *** 



Letters to Bob Foreman itre weteomed 

Do you always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs"? Bob and the editors of spon- 
SOR would be happy to receive and print comments from 
readers. Address Bob Foreman, e o sponsor. 40 E. 49 St. 



62 



SPONSOR 



T. I story board 

A column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

SARRA 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




Designed to pack hard sell between rounds, Sarra's new series ol 50 si cond I V spots 
for Pabst Blue Ribbon Bonis, provides the answer to the catch) query, "What'D 
You Have?" Through clever cartoon presentation, inanimate objects assumi di 
lightful personalities, chanting the now famous theme, "Finest Beer Served \ir 
where!" The series delivers an effortless sales TKO with the double-O - in 
"Smoother-Smoother Flavor" enlarging into coyly winking eyes that resolve magically 
into an inviting glass of beer. Produced by Sarra, Inc. for Pabsl Sales Co. through 
Warwick & Legler, Inc. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




Right down to the sizzling sound ol frying sausage, Sarra's series of 60 and 20 second 
TV spots are outstanding examples of package promotion and television artisitv. 
Live action shots of the product in use and outstanding package display are clev< il\ 
framed within the product's trade-mark seal. Effective, portrait-like food sequences 
are engagingly presented through the simple device of a little boy obviously en- 
joying the product. Skillful visual selling produced by Sarra, Inc. for Swift &: 
Company through J. Walter Thompson Co. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




From a shower of shooting stars, Helene Curtis "Lanolin Discovery" dramatically 
emerges in Sarra's new series of 60 second TV Spots. Woman's eternal quest for 
beauty is subtly presented by live action shots featuring the product that brings 
the "breath of life for lifeless-looking hair!" Animation lends ease to a brief test-tube 
demonstration of product content. An exciting series produced by Sarra, Inc. in 
collaboration with Earle Ludgin 8: Co. for Helene Curtis Industries, Inc. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




Sarra deftly combines the powerful appeal of ingenious animation with a hard- 
driving sales message, in a series of 60 and 20 second TV spots for "Vornado" 
Cooling Appliances. To the cadence of a tricky calypso background, the advantages 
of Vornado exclusive Vortex circulation are enumerated, as the viewer sees the 
Vornado Air Conditioner in attractive home surroundings, circulating "cooled air in 
every corner of the room." Created and produced by Sarra, Inc. through Lago & 
Whitehead. Inc. for the O. A. Sutton Corp. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



12 JULY 1954 



63 





Date in Hollywood" 

with Eddie Fisher 
Gloria DeHaven 
Hugo Winter halter 
'/< hour 3 times weekly 



before you button-u 

Investigate thi: 

ADVERTISED 
OVER i 





RCA 
During the past 12 moni 



"PENTHOUSE PARTY" 

Starring NELSON 
EDDY as host with 
Gale Sherwood 
and a star-studded 
guest list 




THf fREDDY MARTIN SHOW 
V* hour 3 times weekly 



THf WAYNE KING SERUM 
% hour 1 time per '^ 



iaaio plans for 



r 




[SPONSORED 





ig Name Shows 




"Roth and Orch. 

F 

-fs weekly 
1 time P<* 



Thesaurus Delivers to 
Subscribing Stations! 

• 5000 selections 

• Monthly releases of 52 or more 
new selections 

• 1800 singing commercial jingles 

• Weekly scripts for 31 program 
series 

• Production aids • Sound Effects 



TMf SAMMY KAYt SHOW 
V* hour 3 times weekly 



Again and again Sponsors, Stationsand Ad Agencies have given 
us the verdict. Not 1,000 times . . . not 10,000 times . . . but over 
124,800 times during the past 12 months, RCA THESAURUS 
Shows have heen sponsored by advertisers on subscribing sta- 
tions across the country. Why this overwhelming success? Be- 
cause RCA THESAURUS Big Name Shows don't merely build 
audiences, they also sell products and services! 

If you are an Ad Manager, Station Manager, Account Execu- 
tive or Media Manager, before you make any radio plans for t tit 
FALL, consider these money-making RCA THESAURUS 
FACTS! 

RCA Thesaurus Shows get high ratings. Examples: 
WPAR, Parkersburg,W.Va. received 16.2% of avail- 
able listeners in Parkersburg with THESAURUS. 
(Cordon) KRLD, Dallas, Texas received 28% of 
available listeners in Dallas with THESAURUS. 
(Pulse) 

The Big Names mentioned here are only some of the 
headliner's starring in RCA Thesaurus Shows! 

Scripts . . . programing . . . tie-in merchandising aids 
are all part of the Thesaurus Package. 

Hear an audition disc today and judge for yourself! 

RADIO STATIONS! 

SELL ANY OF THESE THESAURUS SHOWS 

AND YOUR LIBRARY PAYS IT'S OWN WAY! 



Concert Hall Of The Air 
Men Behind The Melod) 
Norman Cloutier And His 

Memorable Music 
Sons Of The Pioneers 
The Tex Benekc Show 
Music Of Manhattan 



Church In The Wildwood 

Fran Warren Sings 

\ Festival Of Waltzes 

\ incent Lopez 

Artie Shaw 

Here's June Christy 




And Many-Man\ More! Complete with sponsor-selling brochure 
audience-building promotion kit. sales-clinching audition disc. 



Write, wire, phone today: Dept. No. S-7 



eeorded 

piograni 

services 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

430 fifth Avenue, New York 20, M. Y.-JUdson 2-5011 

445 N. Loke Shore Drive, Chicago 11, III. — WHiteholl 4-3530 



! R 

RCA VICTOR RECORD DIVISION 



1016 N. Sycamore Ave., Hollywood 38, Cd.-HC 



1907 McKinr.e. Ave., Dolloj 1, Tex-llverside 1371 
522 forsyth 8ldg., Atlanta 3, Gc -lAmor 7/03 



YOU TOO 




CONQUISTADOR . 

"conquering" Spanish 
sales in forty five counties of 
Texas with a population 
of over 690,000 Spanish 
speaking consumers 

We have over forty other 
"conquistadors" daily on 




/.' i. ' orti :, President 
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

- nli <l hi/ 
Richard O'Connell, XnCI. 1 /' 

40 Fort 49th St., New York 17, N. Y. 
PLaza 5-9140 

LOS ANGELES — SAN FRANCISCO 

r ■ . - 




agency profile 



Stanley 1. Lomus 

V.P., Commercial Tv Director 
Wm. Esty Co., New York 



There's an old proverb about bakers never eating bread on 
Sundays. Exception to this ancient bon mot is Stan Lomas, Win. 
Est) Co.'s v.p. in charge of commercial tv. who spends his free time 
making documentary films both for amusement and profit. 

"Sometimes, things get particularly hectic here." Lomas confessed, 
taking innumerable film cans from his desk drawer and spreading 
them before him. "At those times I talk about getting away from 
t\. Bui when I'm not making film-. I write about the techniques 
of making them."" 

Lomas shrugged philosophicallv and began reading the labels on 
the various film cans. He found the one he wanted, opened the can 
and unwound a few inches of film. It was a thin strip of color film. 
with two apparentlv identical frames side 1>\ side all the wax down 
the line. 

"Here are some of the 3-D films we've shut in tests for our client-. 
Lomas told SPONSOR. "As for color alone, we've been testing it for 
all our clients for oxer a vear. using various kind- of film stock and 
different techniques." Some 60^i of Win. Esty Co."- estimated 
(45 million over-all hillings in 1953 were in air media. 

"We've learned a lot from doing our own color film and 3-D 
experiments," Lomas continued. "Bui there arc innumerable unusual 
effects that can be gotten with the more prosaic black-and-white film 
if there'- creative thinking in the agency. 

"The best safeguard against wasting a client - mone) and against 
production delays and troubles, is careful pre-planning of a film. 
Lomas encourages his writers to use both tape recorders and an 
an i matic projector on storyboard drawings i machine giving draw ings 
illusion of motion i. This is to net a- realistic a feel of the final 
effect of a commercial before a single fool of film i- shot and wasted. 

Vmong Lomas' current problems: the policing and bookkeeping 
involved in the use of t\ film commercials, due to the s \(. contract 
which provides for re-use payments to actors, Lomas now employs 
one person full-time to keep track of these film commercials, expects 
in need two people bj fall (see Spot t\. page 73). 

His current project at bis Pound Ridge, Y i .. home: to -boot a 
semi-documentary film about the history of his house (built in 
Massachusetts in 1670 and then transported to New York), starring 

his foui sons, of course. * * * 



66 



SPONSOR 




-TARGET TELEVISIO 



KUDNER AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK DETROIT WASHINGTON SAN FRANCISCO 



12 JULY 1954 



67 




SELLS MERCHANDISE IN 
ARIZONA 



Tapping a $20,000,000 
market! That's why, 
month after month 
and year after year, 
these shrewd Yanqui 
advert isers KEEP 
RIGHT ON advertis- 
ing over this 5-year- 
old Spanish-language 
station: 





Borden's Evaporated 

Milk 
Pet Milk 
A-l Beer 
Folger's Coffee 
Lucky Lager Beer 
Goebbel Beer 
Pacific Greyhound 
Coastal Valley 

Canning 
Fab 
La Pina Flour 



85,000 Spanish-speaking people Leesten . . . 
and they BUY! Why not tell them YOUR 
sales-story? Talk is cheap, but results are 
BEEG on Central Arizona's ONLY full-tim< 
Spanish language stationl 

ASK THOSE YANQUIS ABOUT KIFN! 

NATIONAL TIME HARLAN G OAKES 

SALES AND ASSOCIATES 

17 E. 42nd St 672 Lafayette 

New York, Park Place 

New York Los Angeles, Calif. 

KIFH 

860 Kilocycles • 1000 Watts 
REACHING PHOENIX AND 
ALL OF CENTRAL ARIZONA 








Jack Cunningham, president of Cunningham 
<£- Walsh, blasted heavy industry tor its lurk of 
consumer advertising in a speech to 700 admen 
assembled in Boston for the ">(lf/i annual convention 
of the Advertisers' Federation of America on 
21 June. Sniil In-. "They're big enough to be on 
the biggest stock market, but not big enough to 
advertise. We must convince them that they should 
spend at least \' ', a year in advertising. . ." Cun- 
ningham feels heavy industry has ignored mass 
media like radio and tv too long. 



Gordon fiirni/. general manager of WOR and 
WOR-Tt . Neu York, struck a blow at high oper- 
ating costs when the WOR and WOR-TV division of 
General Teleradio won a permanent injunction 
against Local 802 of the iFM in Supreme Court 
late last month. "We had 10 musicians and two 
librarians on staff," Gray told SPONSOR. "In 1953 
they cost us $407,000. At the expiration of our AFM 
contract we told Loral 802 that we wanted to use 
live music as we needed it. not on a quota basis." 
28 February union struct lor "Hie musir on all 
live shotcs." Court ruling gives WOR damages. 



Coin ma ti (I <>r Edward Whitehead, presi- 
dent of Schweppes, has finally burst into air media, 
complete with British accent. The beard of the 
"man from Schweppes" 15 not yet visible to tv tans, 
but radio listeners in 20 markets can now hear the 
Commander introduce himself and sell his product 
while ire is heard dropping into a glass with a 
splash. There's a pause while the Commander 
presumably partakes of the drink, followed In his 
expression of appreciation. These 20- and 60- 
second spots follou HOBATs prim themes. 



Kenneth C. fiifford. president and chairman 
ot the board of Schick, recently announced that his 
firm will remain in the 8:00-9:00 p.m. Saturday 
slot throughout the summer with Sup- Show, over 
Km CBS 7 1 stations. This musical variety show. 
featuring Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, will be shared 
by all three Jackie Gleason sponsors: Schick, Sestle 
and Schaeffer. Talent cost of the show per week 

0T is $10,000 gross, or less than halt 
the $23,000 weekly tab on the Gleason show. Pro- 
L-rum is stheduled to run 3 July till fall. 



68 



SPONSOR 



She Butters Up 

A Large Slice 

Of The Midwest 




Right next door to housewives in 11 states, Wynn 

Speece has been "Your Neighbor Lady" on 

WNAX-570 for 13 years. 

The 5 states — Minnesota, the Dakotas, Nebraska 

and Iowa — in Big Aggie Land aren't enough for 

Wynn. Mail comes in from 11 — plus Canada; in 

10 years she has received 1U million cards and letters. 

Her mail may contain anything from Ma's favorite 

recipe to a family problem. Wynn reads select items on the 

air and asks for listener comment. Result: more mail. 

Participating in this manner, housewives feel that they 

belong to the program, call themselves "Neighbor Ladies," 

listen each weekday, 3:30-4:00 p.m. 

And respond. Over 5.000 loyal listeners from four states 
came to watch the Neighbor Lady demonstrate at a Cook- 
ing School in June. Thirty-five thousand orders 
for "Your Neighbor Lady" booklets 
at 25c a copy were received. Three 
times a week Wynn offered 
SI. 79 food mixers, in seven months 
pulled 4,357 requests by mail 
order alone. Total sales exceeded 

S7.790. 

Do you have something to sell to house- 
wives? Let Wynn tell her "Neighbor 
Ladies." Old friend and confidant to 
thousands, she will tell them about 
your product in her own words. Ask 
the Katz Agency for full details. 



WNAX-570 

Yanktoi-Sioux City 

CBS 

Represented by The Katz Agency 

WNAX-570. a Cowles Station, is under the same manage- 
ment as KVTV-Channel 9. Sioux City, the tv station 
reaching 32 tarm-rich counties in Iowa, Nebr. and S. 
Dak with 632.000 population and S746 million in '53 
retail sales. 











^tw2 




for information call... 



^i2* 



BOSTON 
Liberty 2-7382-3 



\ 



/ 




HOUSTON 
LYnchburg 4191 




LOS ANGELES 
MUtual 1181 




MONTREAL 
GLenview 6121 




CLEVELAND 
CHerry 1-3490 




LOUISVILLE 
WAbash 4317 




PORTLAND 
ATwater 4305 




BUENOS AIRES 
Buenos Aires 31-9501 



^2* 



NEW YORK 
JUdson 6-3400 




DETROIT 
WOodward 2-9792 




CHICAGO 
WEbster 9-3701 




HOLLYWOOD 
Hollywood 4-8268 




RIO DE JANEIRO 
Rio de Janeiro 42-4050 




M 



DALLAS 
PRospect 5898 




SAN FRANCISCO 
DOuglas 2-5560 




TORONTO 
WAInut 2-2133 




SAO PAULO 
Sao Paulo 6-6308 




SAN JUAN 
San Juan 2-5379 2-1097 




MEXICO CITY 
Mexico City 10-26-81 




CARACAS 
Caracas 53-638 59-875 



^H* 



HAVANA 
Havana F-6655 



anew 




\ 



A fifjet w- ike. IteaAt off OraitwwA 



Our model 
is not a pro- 
fessional . . . 
She's a typical 
Northwest 
Oklahoma 
Junior Livestock 
Queen ! 




ABC 



30% of Oklahoma's total population 

38% of Oklahoma's total income 
buying power! 

Over 100,000 Television sets! 



KGEO-TVhu M 



SERVING THIS NEW, RICH MARKET 

• ••WITH 100,000 WATTS ON CHANNEL 

Owned and operated by Streets Electronics, Inc. 
P. R. Banta, Pres. • George Streets, Mgr. 



Represented Nationally by JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 




12 



SPONSOR 



SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 




■ 






WITH NIGHTTIME JAMMED, DAYTIME TV PACE IS QUICKENING 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

|| B What's the timebuyer's outlooh in fall spot tv slots? P<*0<* ~ ' 

l|. How soon will the industry eount tv sets regularly? P<*9<* 7U 

||. is the line being held in spot tv rate increases? P««7<* •• 

l|. To what extent will color be available for spot tv? P«<?<* S2 

l|. Are there any notable trends in spot film commercials? P«ff«* ilii 

If. The SAG scales: how have they affected spot tv business? P<*ge 93 

l(. Are syndicated tv films a big factor in fall spot plans? page it I 

l|. Is "subscription tv" a strong competitor of regular tv? P«9<* 100 



^ X- Can spot tv be used to reach the U.S. farm market? page 102 

^ 12 JULY 1954 73 






SPONSOR postcard survey 
shows when stations plan color 

Nearly one out of every three U.S. tv stations replied 
to SPONSOR postcard checkup on color tv prog- 
ress, affording good cross-section of all outlets. 
Survey was made in June. Network color is most 
advanced; more than 70% of stations said they 
would be so equipped by the end of the year. 
Local color slide and film transmission is next; 
nearly 20% of outlets will have it this year. 

TATIONS WHICH EXPECT TO BE EQUIPPED BY: 



END OF 
1954 



END OF 
1955 



END OF 
1956 



NO DEFINITE 
COLOR PLANS 



38.8% 



5.2% 1.5%. 21.7% 



1. COLOR SLIDES _ 

2. COLOR FILMS 

3. LIVE COLOR SHOWS. 



2.4% 
0.7% 
1.6% 



17.3% 19.6%. 0.8%.. 60.0'; 

18.8% 18.8%.. 0.7%... 60.0 r ; 

4.7% 15.7%.. 4.0%. 74. r ; 



(I 




Availabilities 

Q. From the timebuyer's view- 
point, what's the fall outlook in 
spot tv time availabilities? 
A. 1\ advertisers who have ool yel 

scheduled fall campaigns in spot tele- 
vision can expect to face, in general, 
an availability situation like this: 

1. Mornings: Last year, early- 
morning tv slots were fairl\ plentiful. 
This fall, there will still he mam to 
choose from — particularly in the new- 
est t\ markets — but tin- situation is 
tightening daily. Reason: In the past 
year, networks and stations alike have 
concentrated much of their creative 
efforts "ii early-morning t\. and audi- 
ence levels have risen steadily. NBC 
[*Vs Today i- a commercial success; 



CBS TV's Morning Show is building 
well. Local programs that follow, or 
even precede, these shows are attract- 
ing many of the same type of adver- 
tisers who use morning radio. 

Of course, morning tv sets-in-use 
figures (see page 1. Tv Basics i are 
no match for tin- nighttime t\ fig- 
ures. But a numher of tv sponsors — 
notably Ford Motor, Bond Clothes. 
Robert Hall, P&G I for Gleeml— have 
bought extensive packages of morning 
announcements, chainbreaks and I.D.'s. 

"Morning t\ prices arc now in line 
with ratings and audiences, and an 
early-morning package of announce- 
ments partii ula 1 1 \ at a package dis- 
count — can reach substantial audi- 
ences at low cost,*' a .1. Walter Thomp- 
son timebuj er said. 

Typical bin: On stations repre- 



sented b\ a leading organization, il 
do/en t\ I.D.'s per week in inoniinJ 
time hrin<: a 45' < discount on top o[ 
the regular frequency and dollar-voll 
ume discount-. 

The availability situation is current! 
1\ tightening in late mornings, pari 
ticularh after the breakfast hour. Slot! 
adjacent to the network lineups oil 
CBS T\ affiliates [Godfrey i and NB<| 
I \ i Ding Dong. Home i affiliates arl 
still to be had in some market-. )>ul 
arc not expected to be unsold b\ thl 
end of summer. 

2. Afternoons: With many a housdj 
wife Inning adjusted her daily routinl 
to afford a "t\ matinee" (a fact thfrl 
emerged recentl) in Cunningham I 
Walsh's Videotown studies', afternoon 
l\ is arousing real interest anion! 
advertisers. 



74 



SPONS0 



A checkup among leading tv reps 
showed a sizable advertiser trend to- 
ward afternoon tv. Purchases centered 
mostly on slots next to afternoon 
network programing and in afternoon 
feature film programs. 

Among recent additions to after- 
noon spot tv advertisers: 

P&G, Maxwell House, Savarin, Rival 
Dog Food, Tv Time Pop Corn. Wrig- 
ley's, Conti Castile, Lipton Tea, Peter 
Paul, Kent, Parliament, Coca-Cola, 
and Fritos. Majority of these adver- 

t tisers buy one-minute announcement 

I slots. 

An increasingly popular tv buy is 
the I.D. (10-second) announcement. 

'Consensus of reps: Afternoon slots. 
by fall, will become fairly tight in the 
largest tv markets. By next year, the 

I best-rated afternoon slots will be tight 

[everywhere. 

3. Nighttime: The prime evening 
hours, usually 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., 
tare still the most desired by spot buy- 
ers. Typical comment, from Ted Bates' 
Frank McCann: 

"\ou get the broadest possible 
mixed adult audience when you buy 
next to a top network tv show. Not 
only is the audience composition per- 
fect for a mass product, but the size 



makes Class A time a good buy despite 
its high cost. Also, we believe the 
viewing audience during this period 
is in the most favorable state of mind 
for receiving a commercial message." 
In these hours of peak tv viewing, 
good spot slots are scarce, and the best 
ones are allocated through waiting 
lists. The situation eases somewhat 
in the very late nighttime hours and 
in the secondary tv markets. 



Q. What, exactly, are an adver- 
tiser's chances today of picking up 
nighttime spot tv availabilities? 

A. In the largest tv markets, turn- 
over among nighttime tv spot clients 
is very, very low. According to the 
consensus of reps surveyed In spon- 
sor, it is never more than 10% in the 
large markets and often drops to the 
1 ' < mark. One New York network 
flagship, for example, had no night- 
time spot openings at all between 
October 1953 and March 1954. and 
what few there have been since I they 
averaged out to 0.0' '< of the po- 
tential availabilities) were quickly dis- 
posed of through a priority system. 

In the newer (post-freeze vhf and 
uhf i markets, the situation is relative- 



l\ open but is b) no means Free and 
easj . Jack Peterson of the • leorge P. 
Hollingber) rep firm estimated that 

in the smaller markets, and mi the less- 
importanl outlets in major markets, 
the nighttimi spol turnover is "seldom 
more than 30 to 10' i ." 

W ith nighttime t\ so valuable, 
there's been a growing tug-of-wai late- 
l\ between networks and stations for 
late-night (usualK. L0:30 p.m. to 
I I :(M) p.m. or later) time. In the pasl 
year or so, this has become the favor- 
ite slot to put spot-placed syndicated 
film. But the two largest t\ web*. (IBS 
TV and NBC TV, have made fall plan- 
to air network shows in this time, o< 
casionally surrendering the network's 
option on some afternoon lime in or- 
der to make a trade with a station. 
Already, some multi-market spot film 
advertisers— including Ballantine ( For- 
eign Intrigue), Revlon i Mr. <fe Mrs. 
\orth), Schmidt's Beer (Waterfront \ 
— have had their late-night film shows 
"bumped," or are in grave danger of 
being squeezed out, from network- 
owned outlets. The squeeze play, how- 
ever, isn't yet affecting program ad- 
vertisers with long-term contracts on 
most network affiliates, and doesn't 
touch those on independent outlets. It 
also doesn't affect spot advertisers in 



Tv set COUIlt: Researcher Alfred Politi has been hired by NARTB 
o make special pretest of methods for counting tv homes in U.S., 
•neasure station circulation for NARTB's planned Tv Audit Circulation 



iW»rc» Misimeif ion: Commercials cost more but film business is 
booming. UPA commercial for Jell-O makes clever use of animation 
instead of SAG talent. More animation is used today ihan pre-SAG 




2 JULY 1954 



75 






lal • -\ en n I Feature fi'm shows or 
those with chainbreak and [.D. sched- 
ules. 

But the situation is < utting into 1 1 1«- 
amount of half-hour film programing 
thai network affiliates will now accept 
for fall Mart-. (Sales tip from several 
reps: Station- are starting to program 
syndicated film shows in peak after- 
noon hours, often in special blocks. 
Some of these slots have good rating 
histories, Bince the) arc part of the 
time trades made l>\ stations with 



netwoi k-. i 

"Midnight movie" shows are gain- 
ing in popularity with audiences and 
advertisers, and Pulse ratings of LO 

and .").<) land higher) are fairl\ com- 
mon. \nto-. cigarettes, drug products, 
furniture dealers and movie theatres 
have bought extensively. In the top 
market-, the midnight-hour film bIiows 
are nearly always filled commercially. 
Hut participation advertisers at this 
hour have lateK been operating on 

short-term cycles of six to eight weeks. 



NEW "TV Capitol of 
the Midwest* " 



(*.V<> idle boast — reail copy below 
for proof positive) 




TELECASTING 

ON CHANNEL 5 

BISMARCK, NO. DAK. 

Te/ecosfing from atop the Slate Capitol building, 
KFYR-TV delivers unrivalled coverage in the 

wealthy. Midwest farm bell — and throughout 
the heart of the oil-rich Williston Basin. 

KFYR-TV guarantees a ready-made, 
responsive buying audience, built up Ihrough 
years of top-flight radio programming. 



NBC 



D U M O N T • 




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pODofttiOOO 
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A 



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p a n 
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o : 3 d 

[ID 

onnn 

aaoo 

QDDQ 
DDDQp 

unoo 

ODDD 

dDDi 

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noo 

C r Jt 



Q n D 
DOOO 
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n n q a 

nooo 

DQDQ 

ODDD 

noon 

QDQD 
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DODO 
3000 

00 DC 
On 01) 

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KFYRt 



CHANNEL 



BISMARCK, NO. DAK. 



-IV 

Ktr»[SlNriD NAtlONAllt BY JOHN BLAH 



\ "watch-and-wait" attitude on the 
part of timebuyers will nearly always 
produce a number of well-rated late- 
night movie participations. 



Tv set <-oiiim 



Q Will advertisers be able to 
get some new facts on tv, especial- 
ly a tv set count, in a reasonably 
short time? 
A. ^ es. from two Bources: 

1. Prom a new entit\. tentatively 
called Tv Audit Circulation, being 
sponsored 1>\ the \ \RTB to count t\ 
sets count) 1>\ count) and measure 
station circulation periodically. 

2. From another new organization, 
jirohahl) to he called the Television 

Kdvertising Bureau, which will pr<>- 
mote the use of tv among ad\er! 
and agencies. This too will be a sep- 
arate, independent organization. I It ia 
the result of a merger between the 

I \ \B started bv a committee of broad- 
casters and the NARTB's planned tv 
promotion arm. I 

In effect, the TAG will be a 
search group, the TvAB promotion. 



Q. just how will the circulation 
study work? 

A. The VN.RTB has already let con> 
tracts for the Alfred Politz Research 
firm to do the pre-testing on methodol- 
ogy. Later the pilot studv for the (*-• 
riodic census and circulation sur\e\ 
will be made. 

Politz will do the methodological 
test this summer and turn the result! 
over to Franklin Cawl. the \ARTB 
consultant on the project. Three meth- 
ods — mechanical meter, interview and 
phone — and possibl) a fourth, diar\. 
will be tested in two or three cities 
see how accurate each is. Once the 
method is determined, a pilot «tud\ 
to measure the circulation of ea< I 
tion in some particular <it\ will be 
made. The third step will be t' 
up a permanent corporate organiza- 
tion outside the \ \RTB to do the na- 
tional surve) on a semi-annual b 
The cost? Probably a million b) the 
end of the first two \ears. V\RIBha> 
alread) pul up $34,000 for the pre- 
ing. Richard M. \llerton is man 
of the \ \IM "B Research Dept.. which 
has been working on the project fori 
two \ eai s. 



76 



SPONSOR 




£^ xraps in Wr 








MOMI OFFICE— 500 !0W»BD LAMB BLDG .. IOU0O. OHIO 

JULY 1954 



COVERAGE Northwestern Pennsylvania plus— the bonus 
ol Northeastern Ohio . . . Northwestern New York and 

Canada. 

VIEWERS 218,500 sets in rri-State Market . . . 99.34^ set 
saturation . . . 85% evening sets in use . . . 70« , afternoon 

sets in use . . . f><)< ( morning sets in use. 

RESULTS 1st place Colgate Comedy flour Contest ... 1st 
plate — Block Drug-Ammident Promotion ... 1st Audienci 
Promotion, Billboard. . . 1st Merchandising Promotion. 
Billboard. 

SALES Scores of Success Storus . . . Saturation plus Pro- 
motion secures sales. 

MERCHANDISING Promotion affiliation on WIKK-AM 
and the ERIK DISPATCH . . . Point of SALE DISI'I VYS 
. . . Winner ol the U'cstin^house Ward for promotion on 
football games. 

Ask the EDWARD PETRY man 
for facts today 

WHOO — Orlando, Florida WTOD — Toledo, Ohio 

Forjoe Forjoe 

WIKK-AM — Erie, Pa. The Erie Dispatch — Erie, Pa. 

_-, H.-R. Co. Reynolds-Fitzgerald 

^4twtp^e4 inc. 

. WASHINGTON OFFICI . . 1177 NATIONAL KISS HOO 

77 



Q. Why did it take so long? 
A. Circulation measurement i- com- 
plicated, bIow .iml expensive The old 
Broadcast Measurement Bureau went 
iiiulci because both broadcasters and 
advertisers failed to Bupport it. The 
\. C. Nielsen Co. and the Standard 
\udit \ Measurement Service ran cir- 
culation >ur\e\- in spring 1952, the 
In -i li\ interview and the second )>\ 
mail. Since then Nielsen, sponsored by 
I BS, has updated set (inure- as of 
last fall. The industry today therefore 
is using outdated or projected figures, 



all admittedl) far from accurate, on 
both circulation and county Bel esti- 
mates. To avoid the mistakes of the 
past, the N \UTB wants a scientific ap- 
praisal made of each method of mea- 
suring audiences and then will seek 
the support of the entire broadcasting 
and advertising industry before it pro- 
ceeds with the regular Burvey. B\ put- 
ting the circulation audit on a firm, 
unassailable basis, the NARTB hopes 
to make it as acceptable as the Audit 
Bureau ol Circulations of the news- 
paper industi 5 . 



SELLING 

WESTERN 

MONTANA 



on the 

niR 



MISSOULA, MONTANA 

KGVO-tv 




Technica 

DATA 

• 

General Electric 
Transmitter 

3,920 ft. 

above average 
terrain 

60,000 VIDEO 

30,000 AUDIO 

• 

2-16 mm. 

PROJECTORS 

• 

2 AUTOMATIC 

2x2 

2 STATION 
CAMERAS 



60,000 watts 

KGVO-TV is the ONLY station covering Missoula's trade 
area of 9 western Montana counties . . . and what counties! 
Read on . . . last year, retail sales topped S 1 13. 900,000.00. 
45% live in town: 20<~r in non-farm homes: 35% on farms and 
enjoy more cash income than farmers in 41 other states. Site 
of State University and center of a vast resort area. 

Our TV retailers sa\ . "3,000 sets in town and 10.000 in 
the area.'' Remember, you'll have a minimum of f> persons 
at each set 'cause TV is NEW, in this region. 

100 microvolt area has 100 mile radius with another 50 
mile secondary. 

Gel in on this rich market while you enjoy a BONUS \ i« u . 
ing audience yet pay only regular rates. You'll stay in. 

WIRE TODAY 

for brochure and rates 

or contact 
GILL-PERNA, reps. 



TvAB 

Q. How will the Television Ad- 
vertising Bureau be set up? 
A. Probablj like tin- Broadcast Ad- 
vertising Bureau i for radio), but de- 
tail- will undergo preliminary discus- 
sion in Washington 22 July when the 
all-industry committee appointed to 
handle the problem meets. The or- 
ganization will promote network as 
well as spot and local tv. 

The committee grew out of a meet- 
ing between the N \BTB and the "old" 
TvAB in Washington 30 June. It con- 
sists of 10 men. For the TvAB are 
Richard \. Moore, KTTV, Los An- 
geles, who was chairman of the bu- 
reau formed in Chicago in May; 
Roger W. dipp, WFIL-TV, Philadel- 
phia; Lawrence H. I Bud I Roger-. 
WSAZ-TV, Huntington. \V. Ya.: II. \\ 
Slavick, WMCT (TV), Memphis, and 
George B. Storer Jr.. Storer Broadcast- 
ing Co., Miami. For the NARTB are 
Clair R. McCollough, WGAL-TV, Lan- 
caster. Pa., and new chairman of the 
NARTB's Television Board: Kenneth 
Carter, \\ A \M (TV), Baltimore; 
Campbell Vrnoux, WTAR-TV, Nor- 
folk. \ice chairman of the NARTB Tv 
Board, W. D. (Dub) Rogers Jr.. 
\\ Dl B-TY. Lubbock, Tex., and Merle 
S. Jones, CBS TV v. p. in charge of 
CBS-owned stations and general 
services. 

The committee w ill meet in late 
Jul) to complete the organization of 
the bureau, and the new TvAB should 
be underway 1>\ fall. 



Q. What happens to the "old" 
TvAB? 

A. It never got into operation, sa 
there won't he am trouble in incor- 
porating it into the new merged T\ \B. 
The "old one was horn in New ''l ork 
22 April with Richard P. Doherty, 
ex-JN \1M'B v. p.. as consultant when 2"> 
t\ stations decided il was time a pro- 
motion arm for tv was established. It 
was formally launched in Chicago at 
the \ \l! I'll Convention in Ma\ . In 
June just as efforts were being made t<» 
< omplete the I \ VB's organization, the 
N \1» IB announced plans to push its 
own. Result: Overnight the two groups 
got together and agreed to merge. 

Reason: Xobod\ really wanted to 
see a i\ bureau set up without the net- 
works (biggest single contributors to 
the BAB). The old T\ \B was open 



78 



SPONSOR 



T 



WO I -TV' 




CHANNEL 5 AMES, IOWA 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

CBS-DuMONT- ABC 



TO: Stations, Agencies, Representatives (Please circulate) 



RE: Television in Central Iowa 




•^ffi^z 



WOI-TV, the primary affiliate in Central Iowa of CES, 
ABC and DuMont reaches 2^0,000 television hones within a 100- 
mile radius of Ames. Owned and operated by Iowa State College, 
WOI-TV has been Des Moines' and Central Iowa's dominant TV ser- 
vice since February, 1950. 




V 






)a*k* 



Fifty-one prosperous Central Iowa counties are within 
the WOI-TV coverage area. Population figures show ^18,380 
v^S^jBJSB. households; one-fourth of these are rural households.^— 



f^y^U^ 









The goal of the Iowa State College station is to provide 
total television service to its nearly 750,000 Iowa viewers. Its 
17-hour television day is filled with the top-rated network 
programs plus 24 hours per week of award-winning local produc- 
tions. 

p"H In addition to its 100-raember professional radio and 

television staff, Iowa State College provides a television 
laboratory designed to train personnel fully-qualified to take 
their places in the television industry. And programs on kine- 
scope produced by WOI-TV are now aired on other television sta- 
tions coast to coast. 







For more details on the WOI-TVf success story, 
Weed Television. 




contact 





WO l-TV tint in Centrallowa 



cy**^. 



79 



to the networks' owned-and-operated 
stations, bul the) were reluctant I" 
join. I oo man) people in the industi 5 
it-li nothing 1 ould be worse than to 
have two i\ 1 * 1 • • r r 1 < >t i « >i 1 bureaus issuing 
conflicting facts and figures. The in- 
fluence ol \ UM'li President Harold 
E. Fellows, Dul) Rogers and Dick 
Moore prevailed, and the groups 
merged. 



Q. What will the TvAB offer ad- 
vertisers? 

A. Probabl) much of what the old 
I \ \H prospectus > ailed lor: 1 1 1 Film 
directory, < 2 \ improved sales met hod-. 
1 3 1 statistical bureau. 1 h spot tv 
index, (5) spot t\ estimator, 16) gen- 
et al research. The old bureau promised 
to "educate agency and advertising ex- 
ecutives in the use of tv" and to 
"explore spe< :ific advertisers' prob- 
lems" in video. The new one should 
do the same. 



Q. What do admen want from a 
TvAB? 

A. Sponsor explored this problem 
in detail in the 14 June 1954 issue. 
( See "What admen want from the 



I \ \I5." 1 Here's a summar) of the 
points tm >-i often mentioned in spon- 
sor's -III \e\ : 

• \ <|ui< k ua\ to estimate Bpot tv 
1 osts. 

•Standardization of t\ rate cards. 

• Dollar figures on expenditures b) 
Bpol clients. 

■Impact studies on program vs. 
announcements. 

• Vudience data b\ se\. a«;e. socio- 
economic status. 

•Effectiveness of spot t\ and other 
media compared. 

1 I hi SPONSOR'S initial -tor\ on a 
l\ \H. which helped stimulate creation 
of a promotion bureau for the indus- 
try, see "Should there be a \\ BAB?" 
30 November 1953.1 



Business outlook 



Q. How's spot tv doing? 

A. It's up 25', in 1953 over the 
year before. The figures (see l\ 
Basics) based on FCC figures show 
spot tv time sales grew from $7.7 
million in 1949 to S25 million in 1950, 
$59.7 million in 1951, $80 million in 
1052 and $100 million in 1953. 



Itntc* outlook 

Q. Can sponsors expect more 
spot tv rate increases this fall? 
A. Situation shapes up in tbi> fa-h- 
ion : 

1. Old stations in old markets'. 
Sime rates are directly related to set 
< in ulation. the rate outlook for estab- 
lished t\ stations primarily the pre- 
fiee/e \lil outlet- in the larger mar- 
kets — is expected to be -table tin- fall 
in Class \ periods, most rep- predict. 
Some upward adjustment of rat< - 
perhaps a 5 to l0*/i hike ma) • 
about in afternoon slots and in tin- 
local time immediatel) following the 
1 lose of network telecasting, but onlj 
where increased audience size justifies 
a rate increase or an upward reclassi- 
fication of a time period. 

2. \eu stations in old markets: In 
the case of uhf or \hf outlet- which 
have entered an existing \hf market. 
some rate increase; — up to 20', or 
more — are anticipated. I hf stations 
which will seek such upward adju-t- 
ments of time costs, of course, will be 
those with the highest "conversion 
rates." New vhf outlets in old mar- 
kets seeking increases will do so on 



TH E REAL 
POWER I N 



Behind the marble curtain of official Washington is a city few people kno*. 

But smart advertisers should. Because an awful lot of the 

nation's capital is right here in the nation's capitol. 

Buying power has no politics. In Washington, family income is the 
second highest in the U. S. with an average of S7. 259.00! 

Washington is hig. Its America's 10th largest city with 1.655.600 people. It's 
. . . with 330.300 privately employed and 294.500 in government set 

And it spent a healthy 52.027.037.000 last year in retail sales - which is 

a lot of money even in Washington. 

And if you'd care for the returns from the outlying districts . . Arlington 

County. Va. and Montgomery County, \K1. just outside the Washington 

metropolitan area are the two highest family income counties in the country 



WASHINGTON 



To tap this tremendous buying power, it's good busini »> '■ 
use the most powerful advertising medium in 
Washington. The only television station in Washington 
operating on maximum authorized p< 

WN BW 4 

N R P ' S VV ^HINGTON 

|_T V Rt pit si nti d by \ HC Spot Sales 



80 



SPONSOR 




It's as simple as this: 

Highest Tower plus Maximum Power equal Channel 5 
To a television station already great by any normal standards 

add — Chicago's Highest Television Antenna 
add— Chicago's only station tvith maximum power authorized by the FCC 
result — WNBQ — now delivering in the teeming heart of 
America's second largest market a better signal to more than two million television homes 



WNBQ— the NBC station you already know for its quality iu programming, audience acceptance, mer- 
chandising and sales impact is now transmitting a more powerful, more efficient picture to an even greater 
portion of the rich heart of the Middle West. This market represents almost 15 hillion dollars in effecti\«- 
buying power and is now dominated by the vast new \^.\BO tower, the highest TV antenna in the area. 
It's obvious — your television advertising will look better to more people on 

I WNBQ channel 5 

>]IH IN CHICAGO 

Represented by XBC Spot Sales 




J 




AVOID COSTLY 
DUPLICATION 

BUY WTVP 

Dacatur, Illinois 



Ch. 17 




tlic basis of audience size as indicated 
bj ratings. 

3. New stations in new markets; 
\l"-t of the new. post-freeze Btations 
—both uhf and \lil started off with 
base hourlj rates (Class A, one-time) 
of between $100 and $200. Last fall 
many reps predicted that these rates 
would increase sliarph throughout the 
industry. However, the increases have 
been -lower than anticipated; the sled- 
ding lias been tough for many of tlie 
new outlets. But some outlets will seek 
increases (of up to 25' ', I in the new- 
e>t markets, reps believe. 



Color tv 

Q. Will color television be a fac- 
tor in spot advertising this fall? 
A. Yes. Despite the uncertainties 
over current U.S. purchases of color 
receivers, the lack of standardized col- 
or film and live production, the lack 
of uniform price formulas and the 
high cost of experimentation, several 
of the top agencies, stations and reps 
are discussing limited color tv spot ad- 
vertising for fall 1954. 

Q. How many U.S. homes will be 
equipped with color tv receivers 
in the near future? 
A. According to the latest estimates 
of Radio Corporation of America and 
a recent study made for Fortune mag- 
azine, there will he somewhere between 
50,000 and 200,000 U.S. homes 
equipped with color receivers at the 
close of 1954; and between 300,000 
and 1,200.000 color-equipped by the 
end of 1955. RCA's is the lowest es- 
timate. 1>\ the way. RCA based its 
figure on a survey of the industry, 
Fortune on an analysis by an economic 
forecasting firm. > For full details, see 
chart, page 120. I 

\\ hat this means to the spot t\ ad- 
vertiser is that the audience potential 
for color t\ announcements and local 
programs will he limited: 

1. B\ the number of color-equipped 
homes in major market-. 

2. By the number of Btations 
equipped to televise -pot color (slide-. 
Elms, shows) in the near future. 

Q. What accounts for the wide 
variations in estimates of color re- 
ceiver production? 
A. In the case of the two sets of 



figures cited above, the RCA figures 
are believed to he a conservative min- 
imum: the Fortunr figures a fairly 
optimistic projection based on antici- 
pation of a sizable drop in color pic- 
ture tube pri< es. W hat the real truth 
is, nobod\ know- \<(. sponsor pre- 
sents the two figures to show that, at 
I hi- stage, there is a considerable range 
of opinion about the future growth of 
color 1\ in American homes. 



Q. How many U.S. stations will 
be equipped to handle spot tv ad- 
vertising in color in the near fu- 
ture? 

A. To answer this question, sponsoi 
made a special Fall Facts color sur- 
vey of all of the 408 tv stations now 
on the air, or planning to be ver\ soon. 
Replies were received from a little less 
than one out of every three stations — 
31.2%. VirtualU everj major I 5 
market was represented in the replies 
and responding stations ranged from 
the largest and oldest vhf outlets in 
established markets to outlets due on 
the air in the next few months, spon- 
sor believes its survey, at presstime, 
represents a good sampling of all tv 
stations. 

These were the spot tv highlights 
of the study: 

1. Color slides: Equipment to tele- 
vise color slides or slide-films (cost: 
estimated $18,000 1 seems to be the 
first local color target of most stations. 
About 2.4'7 of U.S. stations now have 
this equipment. Some 17. -V ', expeit 
to have color slide gear by the end 
of 1954. A little less than one out of 
five outlets — 19.6 r '< — expect to have it 
sometime in 1955, and a few — 

— indicated 1956. Some 60' i were 
undecided, had indefinite starting dates 
or had no plans at present. 

Outlook for sponsors: Nearly 2' 
of U.S. stations will he equipped to 
televise color slide commercials local 
]\ 1>\ the end of the \ear: nearly ! 
by the end of next year. 

2. Color films: Getting a color tv 
film projector (cost: estimated $62,- 
0001 follows installation of color slide 
gear closel) as an objective of 1 .S. tv 
stations. Fewer stations have > olor film 
equipment ri::ht now 0.7' < hut 
slightly more stations — 18.:: ex- 
pect to have color film projectors bj 
the end of the year, as • ompared with 
color slide chains. Another 18 

peel to install color film gear b) the 



82 



SPONSOR 



ASK 

YOUR 

NATIONAL 

REPRESENTATIVE 



You're on the verge of a decision, and a problem. 

What business papers to pick for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, for your choice can have a telling 
effect on your national spot income. 

But where to get the facts? 

The answer is simple. Ask your national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. They learn which business 
papers are appreciated, read and discussed by buyers of broadcast time. 

His is an expert opinion. Don't overlook your national representative. 



SPONSOR 

The magazine radio and tv advertisers use 



end "t 1 955. ["he numbei h ho expect 
in have theii film equipmenl installed 

b) 1956 i- I '.7' . . rhose w iili no plana 
amount to 60%. 

Summing up. nearl) 2i>'. ,,| the tv 
outlets will In- equipped i" project col- 
"i him 1>\ the end of the year; nearl) 
Mi', bj the end of l ( r>:>. 

3. /./(<• local cdot shows: Buying a 
coloi camera chain, of course, is the 
biggest plunge a station can make- in 
• oloi i<-li'\ ision. It- cost w ill be ap- 
proximated >7~>.()0() i more or less). 
As might be expected, stations are 
moving more slowl) in the direction 
of local live color shows than they are 
in that of network or "Vanned'" color. 
\ moderate amount of stations — some 
1.695 have local camera chains for 
color telecasting right now. But less 
than five out of every 100 — 4.7', 
expect to have color cameras b\ the 
end of the \ear. 15.7'. expect to he 
thus equipped in 1955 and 1', named 
1956 as their target. Some 74' ■'< of 
the stations had indefinite plan-. 

Outlook for sponsors: It will he 
some time before you can shop for 
local live color shows in more than a 
few market-. \\ hereas some 20 out of 
ever) 100 outlets will have color slide 



or film equipment l>\ the end of the 
year, a little more than -i\ out of 100 
outlets will have color camera-. Bv 
I 1 ).").") the situation will have improved, 
hut about twice a- man) stations will 
have projection gear a- < ompared with 
live cameras. Vmong stations now on 
the air with regular local live color 
-how- are WRY-TV, Oklahoma City. 



Q. How many stations will be 
equipped to handle network color 
in the near future? 
A. Color installations b) -tations to 
televise network color programs will 
be considerably more widespread, at 
least for the next year, than the facili- 
ties to televise color locally, according 
to present predictions. RCA, for in- 
stance, estimates color tv will be fed 
this fall to 75'. of tv areas on net- 
work lines. 

For details, see section on Network 
tv, page 1 1 7. 



Q. What does this mean to tv 

advertisers? 

A. Roughly, this: 



SO. DAKOTA 



The Basic ABC'S 

of Buying TV in 

the Omaha Market 




UDIENCE 



KMT V completely covers the big, prosperous Omaha 
market — the one dominant TV station with 11 of the top 15 nighttime weekly net- 
work shows ... 7 of the 10 most popular mulfi weekly ind Omaha's most popular 
locally-produced shows ... as well as 8 of the top 10 daytime shows. (Get KMTV's 
complete audience leadership picture from Hooper. Pulse or ARB.I 



m 



ONUSES 



. . . KMTV's JOO-somc national ,»nd local advertisers (more 

than any other TV station in the area ) all like these KMTV selling extras: strong 

merchandising helps . . . Mid**e\t\ finest live commercial facilities, including rear 

cr«€D projection . . . KMTV's consistently big mail response . . . special events 

. . i:id other promotional and publicity bonuses. 



c 

_^l" V tKAbt . , KMTV has a * to 1 leadership ratio over 7 other TV 

stations ,is iln titt,- fttation best-received and most-watched within i 100-mile radius of 
Omaha, according to an impartial SUTVC) i name and itatJstlCS on request ) . BeCAUSS 
of KMTV's low channel >. its maximum pow or, and the Hat Nebraska- low a terrain. 
K M I V is the favorite TV st.tnon in this blg-buyinsj 2*>0.000-sei Missouri Vallev mar- 
ket with two billion dollars to spend. 

I jL, tdrantag€ of //»<*»■ "Sales-Producing -//H v* today. Contact KMTV or your 
Petry repreMentathrt. 

TELEVISION CENTER 



CBS e ABC 
DUMONT 



KIT1TV 

CHANNEL 3 

MAY BROADCASTING COMPANY 



OMAHA, NEBR. 

Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO , INC. 



1. Networks will he able to offer 
color tv audiences sooner than spot 
tv reps and stations, since the usual 
( 1 1 — t step in adding color equipment 
to tv stations is to add facilities for 
televising from network souro 

2. Network- will th u- be making a 
plav for experimental color tv budgets 
using their head start in color tv 
lure. 

3. This situation, however, will be 
far from permanent. Hv L955, the 
number ol television stations equipped 
to broadcast color film will begin to 
catch up with the numbei equipped for 
network transmission. 



Q. What is the spot cost outlook 
in color tv? 

A. \l the moment there are no defi- 
nite formula- to follow. However, 
SPONSOR'S siirvev of I .S. -tation- 
above) turned up some interesting 
guideposts. Station- were asked ti 
timate the extra percentage that spon- 
sors would he charged for televis _ 
in color from -lido, film or live -how-. 

Here i- a round-up of the e-tin 
hv stations of additional spot tv color 
charges : 

WT\ J. Miami: This Florida outlet 
plans to charge an additional K''< for 
color slide or film handling after I 
Januarv 1955 and an additional 2 
for live color local programing afta 
June 1955. 

KOIN-Tl . Portland, Ore: No extra 
price has been set yet hv station for 
local live shows, hut slides and film in 
color will cost an additional 30 r i for 
handling charges after 1 November 
I').", 1. 

KGi 0-Tl . Missoula, Mont.: With 
il- color targel set for L956 station 
plans to charge an additional 20' < in 
handling charges for color slides and 
film, an extra 2.V « in local live color 
production < osts. 

SPD-TV, Toledo: Color film and 
-lides will cost a sponsor an extra 
209i after October of this year. Kxtra 
prices for local live color -how- have 
not vet been set. 

// 1/ tR-Tl . Baltimore: Pre-entlv 
airing a total ol 17 news program- in 
color per week, tlii- veteran vhf oullet 
i- alreadv charging li>'. additional 
for color slide handling, plan- to 
charge the same this fall for film show- 
ings. 

// MHR-TI Jacksonville: Color slide 
equipment will be installed hv Januarv 



84 



SPONSOR 



ONE MAN'S OPEN MIND 

is somebody else's hole-in-the-head 




JUST to keep the readers of Sponsor 
aware of the way the wind blows in cer- 
tain quarters, here are a pair of consumer 
magazine clippings: 

". . . how to teach a crow to talk? Put it 
in a dark room. Turn on a radio. After a 
jew weeks the crow gets lonesome and starts 
talking." The editor commented, "Who 

wants a crow that talks like a radio?" 

Item 2: "One warm spring evening recent- 
ly a pair of Indian braves, in town to cele- 
brate, checked into a hotel, opened the win- 
dows, and turned on the room's tv set. It so 
happened that the Stockyards were par- 
ticularly fragrant tiiat evening. 'Ugh' re- 
marked one of the men, 'television smell 
terrible'." 

We bore that with equanimity; what got 
us was the comment which followed: "Isn't 
that absurd? Indians never say ugh." 



Apparently everyone doesn't share oui 

enthusiasm for radio and tv in general and 
KGNC in particular. Anent the latter, with 
innate immodesty we call your attention to 
a Fact: Amarillo is again No. 1 lor the na- 
tion in retail sales per family. II this sug 
gests that we're worth an investment, it's 
no coincidence. 



K G N C-AM & TV 



~W| Amarillo 




NBC and DuMONT AFFILIATE 



AM: 10,000 watts, 710 kc. TV: Channel 4. Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 

12 JULY 1954 



85 



of next year, .it which lime sponsors 
will l>c charged an additional I"', 
foi < oloi slide handling. 

KPRt // . Houston: Maj L955 i- 
Limit date foi installation of < oloi 
slide ami film equipment, with local 
coloi i\ cameras due in October L955. 
No extra < harge is anticipated for « ol- 
<n slides and films, although a premi- 
um "i ii i' , u ill be charged Eor li\ e 
local color shows. 



I i In i commercials 

Q. What is the 1954 outlook for 
film commercial producers? 

A. Excellent, most of them say. Most 
producers surveyed by sponsor expect 
an increase of 10 to I .V , . A sizable 
minorit) expects that the addition of 
new l\ markets may push business 
20^ ahead of 1953. 



Q. What general trends are no- 
ticeable in agency demands for 
film commercials? 
A. Fewer but costlier and more com- 
plex commercials for use on a spot 
ha-i-. The reverse trend seems to be 



ii in- ul commercials produi ed for pro- 
gram use. Here the tendency is to- 
ward simpler testimonial-type commer- 
cials. In both cases, the trends are a 
direcl outgrowth id v \<» demands for 
re-use paj ments to plaj ers. 

The consensus among producers is 
that agencies have developed greater 
creativity in storyboards, that their 
thinking has become more close!) 
geared to production values and the 
visual aspects ol t\. "The era when 
print copywriters were rushed into t\ 
commercial writing seems to have 
finalh ended." one producei remarked. 



Q. How long does it take to 
make a film commercial? 
A. Answers varied from three to 
eight weeks. However, consensus oi 
film producers has it that best reMilt- 
are obtained from the following sched- 
ule: 

• Five weeks to shoot a 60-second 
commercial I be it live action, ani- 
mated, a combination of the two. or 
clotted with opticals I — that i-. five 
weeks after the finished storyboard 
is delivered. 

• A couple of days for lahoratorv 



work to deliver I'M) print- of llii- com- 
men ial. 

• \t least eight weeks for -lop-mo- 
tion work or unusual amount- of ani- 
mation. 



Q. What is the average cost of a 
60-second film commercial? 

A. There- no such animal as an 
average commercial. However, 85.500 
i- a prett) typical cost of a minute 
commercial. Production costs i 
from a- low a- $600 for silent film 
with -eparate sound track to over > I ">.- 
000 foi -nine elaborate jobs combin- 
ing animation and live action with 
sync -omul. Since close to ')()' < ol 
the production cost i- attributable to 
labor, a great deal depends not onlj 
upon the number of people required 
for a particular job but also upon the 
( alibre of talent emplo) ed. 

The cost variable- in film commer- 
cial production are considerable. \ 
quick look at the possible components 
of production will give sponsors an 
idea why it takes film producers more 
than a quick look at a storyboard to 
give an estimate: 

1. Creative uork- script and story- 



IN CENTRAL 
SOUTH CAROLINA 




By fall WIS-TY will up its power to 269.000 watts, 
almost triple its present output. 

Power plus programs, an unbeatable combination A Strong NBC schedule 
. . . outstandini; local productions and film features . . . 
and local newsreel coverage of the State capital's newsworthy events 
filmed l>v WIS-TV, developed in Columbia, and telecast on WIS-TY 
minuter after they occur have quickly established WIS-TV's popularity. 

l'or reMiltv with your fall campaigns, choose Channel 10. \YIS-TY 

. . . the choice of more than 1(10.000 TV owners in this rich market 

Charles A Batson, Managing Director G. Richard Shafto, President 



CHANNEL 10 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

ONLY VHF FACILITY 
CENTRAL SOUTH CAROLINA 

NBC on Channel 10 




Represented nationally by Free & Peters 



- 



86 



SPONSOR 



op.( 



It of 



ED M«KENZIE 

dean of Detroit's disc jockeys 

NOW on Television 

(WXYZ-TV Channel 7) 

and radio (wxyz) 



«t tit 









Ed McKenzie's 

Saturday 
party 



WfT A group of teen-agers from Detroit high- 
schools and clubs are Ed's guests each 
week at the "corner sweet shop". Records 
are previewed, famous guests entertain. 
There are dance contests and teen-age 
talent contests, too. Saturdays, 12 Noon 

tO 2:00 P.M. Participating 

WXYZ-TV • CHANNEL 7 



'> 






Ed McKenzie's 

record matinees 

Latest record releases and all-time favor- 
ites plus lively comments have won a wide 
following for Record Matinee. Interviews 
with famous names in music(shown:Teresa 
Brewer) are also featured. Monday 
through Friday, 3:00 to 6:15 P.M. 

Participating 

WXYZ • RADIO 






L t 



X 



Jl 



lh.. 






SANTA'S HELPERS 



TRUSCON MILLS 
AT YOUNGSTOWN 



AT MUSKOGEE, 



DECEMBER 1. 




' 



WWTV 

CHRISTMAS 
SHOPPING/ 






a 



A 



va*» 



&VPJ 



>-^t 



A 90 Mile signal radius from a 
quarter mile of steel on the peak 
of Michigan, a half mile above 
Lakes Michigan and Huron! 

The HOME TOWN STATION of 
237 Michigan Communities 

now will give you 
FOUR MAJOR MARKETS: 

MUSKEGON 

GRAND RAPIDS 

SAGINAW 

BAY CITY 




CBS — DUMONT— ABC 



WEED TELEVISION - W. L SAIES. GRAND RAPIDS 
SPARTON BROADCASTING COMPANY 



board: These are general!) done b] 
agenc) staffers, sometimes In ihe pro* 
' ducer. 

2. Photograph) : Cost of photog- 
raph) depends upon whether the job 
is to be done in a studio i which means 
a rental fee) or on location. It de- 
pend-, too, upon whether the film can 
be shot with a silent camera or with 
synchronized sound. The numbei oj 
people to appear in a live-action film 
affects not onl) cosl of S \(] re-use 
payments, bul also cost of directioi 
and camera work. If it's to be anima- 
tion. -<ale varies depending upon 
whether film is to be done with lim- 
ited or full animation or filmograph. 
Stop-motion photograph) calls foi 
pensive lab work. 

3. Recording: S VG re-use paymi 
are required for off-screen voices, ex- 
cept for "omnies" (that i». unidentifi- 
able voices). The \I\I controls cosl 
of the music. Special sound effectj 
can mean another cost in< n-i-..-. \nd. 
of course, there's sound studio rental 
to be paid. 

4. Direction: The scale varies here 
too depending upon whether it's a live- 
action or animated commercial not 
to mention cost of the sound director. 

5. Opticals: ProperU used, wipes, 
dissolves and fane) titles exploding 
the screen can be ver) effective. 
They're also expensive. 



Q. How does the cost of film 
commercials today compare with 
cost five years ago? 

A. Costs have risen as much as 50'£. 
Bob Klaeger. Transfilm v.p.. pegs the 
cost rise of the "mythical average com- 
mercial" at approximateh 33 r J since 
1949. 

Because of changes in production 
techniques and in scheduling, it's pret- 
ty hard to draw a completel) fair com- 
parison. In the earK days of t\ film 
commercials i say around 1948 1 ag 
<ic> gave producers eight weeks to do 
a certain job. Two weeks is more like 
it today. 

Since most of the labor is em- 
ployed on a per-da) basis, total pro- 
duction cost depends a great deal upon 
pre-shooting plans and scheduling. 

Here are some round figures for 

labor scales: 

1949 1954 

Studio mechanics $25 .i daj $35 .< da) 
(gripa v Lighting 

( .urn i .urn n $6"i a dav $liin to $12 

Din iiot> I ■ daj $125 a da\ 

Assistant directon v -'T i dai $55 i d;i» 



88 



SPONSOR 



Other factors that have contributed 
to the rising cost of tv commercial 
films are the more stringent demands 
of agencies and clients. A few years 
ago, four or five opticals in a 60-sec- 
..iid commercial would have been con- 
sidered a pretty elaborate job. Today 
it's not unusual to have as many as 
10 or 12 opticals (wipes, dissolves, 
titles) in a 20-second film. 



pnoti ; 

fcjl 






ion £1 

I rei 
liredi 



being 



lojrij 
i far 

aym 
ices 



Q. How much work is 
done in color? 

A. There isn't a producer in the bus- 
iness who hasn't got a dozen or more 
cans of color film footage to show. 

Screen Gems, for example, has con- 
ducted experiments with three major 
color stocks: Eastman. Technicolor 
and Monopak f 16 mm. ) . Depending 
upon the stock and technique used. 
• olor will add anywhere from 20 to 
50% to the over-all cost of producing 
a film commercial. In other words, 
color will cost about three times as 
much per foot for raw negative stock 
as black-and-white (12.5c per foot 
of color compared with 4.5c per foot 
of black-and-white). 

The New York Film Producers' As- 
sociation, which represents the bulk of 
New York commercial and industrial 
film producers, also conducted tests 
with color film this spring in close col- 
laboration with NBC. The results of 
these tests were to be shown on 12 
July in NBC's Colony Theatre on 
closed circuit. 

Here's how these tests were made: 
The Film Producers' Association used 
three types of film stock to make the 
tests — Technicolor with a three-strip 
camera, Eastman 35 mm. and 16 mm. 
commercial JCodachrome. The same 
make-up and lighting were used for 
all three films in order to keep the 
conditions as similar as possible and 
thus control the variables. 

Among the problems the association 
discovered in making these films Roger 
Lewis of United Artists mentioned the 
following: "Splices create a technical 
problem. We found that we had to 
make a print from an edited negative 
that had been processed in the lab. 
Also, you can't run a color print near- 
ly as often as a black-and-white print. 
If the sprocket holes are a little worn 
the print doesn't run smoothly." 

12 JULY 1954 




'ttj^'eQiAg/ety).. 



"Mini, it's been dug!" 

"You mean the fact that KATV's transmittei i^ jusi -1 miles 
from LITTLE ROCK— SAME DIS I VN( I from the BAT! I R\ 
to ihe BRONX-" 

"Man, you're with it." 

"Everybody's with KATV 80,000 sets in the area as of July 
I, 1954 — and growing all the time." 

"Are I here people around?" 

".")8f), r )00 — all within KATV's primarj coverage, according to 
Sales Management's May 10, 1954 Survey, 61 Mining Power." 

"Do they spend money/" 

"$497,456,000 last year — and they've gol it i<> spend, with an 
effect i\c having income of $<ifi9,4 10,000." 

"It's a real crazy market!" 

"33rd in the nation, with its population — a COOL 1)1 \I 
foi advertisers!" 

"Man, you arc note exceedingly HEP." 

"I'm real gone — to the guys who know all aboui it — Avery- 
Knodel. Inc." 




KATV 



JOHN Fl)GATE,M6fc. 

LITTLE- ROCK, ARK. 



£HANN&U 




^ 



AVEfcY-fcNODEL.INC. 

NATIONAL REP. 



89 



Q. Wh.it are the advantages and 
disadvantages of the different 
types of film stock? 
A. Ii> it- filmii prodw I- in 

three different pi n < Jems 

■ up m itli the follow ing « ompai i- 

Kodat hrome ad\ anta{ - Prici 
ni.il film i» lowest It original 
film i- used I"' i ex- 

. ellenl definition and i "l"i « | u-« 1 i t \ . 

Kodachron < > ( >t i - 

cab .11- limited i" diaaolvet and fades. 
I li< i i ii I — ..i qualit) in re- 

■ | > t iiit—. \l- -t "I release pi inl 

i- highei Generall) the sound tra< k 
isn i I .1- thai "t the othei -. 

\inl. editing 16 nun i- .i tough job. 

/ astman ad\ tallages I ai get film 
-i/.-. bettei values in making prints 
Innii .t negative rathei than a j>«» — iiix «- 
i l.i< I'M-.. \U.p. \ mi i .in make 
some opticals with Eastman, and you 
gel bettei resolution. 

Eastman disadvantages In reduc- 

nun. tn Id mm. pi int- gel 

\ . I In- -ti»< k has less < olor sat- 
uration .iml a less satisfactorj Bound 
track than I echnu olor. 

Technicoloi advantages This film 
offers greatest control ol coloi satura- 
tion, greatest i onl rol oi opti< als, !>h- 
ter qualirj sound track and low re- 
lease |irint ■ osts, 

Technicoloi disadvantages I >ri ^»- 
inal production costs are higher with 
I ci linn oloi .mil resolution i> not quite 

■ "•ii ,i- h itli othei I'H'i esses. 



Q. What's being done to hold 
the cost line for film commercials? 



A. \- the industrj has continued to 
. film prodw ers have been gain- 
ing expei ieix e in i utting i "i ners in 
prodw lion. I hej 've learned to do 
elaborate jobs in one-fourth <>l the 
time. 

I 1 1 1 1 1 -i.m It, !••". has been continu- 
ous!) im|ii>i\ iiu I astman, foi exam- 
ple, i- working -in a film which will 
use mil. Ii leu light, hero e sai ing cli- 
ent- . i. -t nl expensive li^litin^ equip- 
ment and to hnii ians. 

However, agero ies and clients have 
become more demanding about the 
qualit) of work that the) < onsidei a< - 
ceptable. In animation, for example, 
the trend is toward brush inking rath- 
ei than the cheapei method <>f pen ink- 
ing. \ few years ago, an animation 
job with three tones of gre) was < on- 
sidered more than adequate. M<»st ani- 
mated commen ials toda) have multi- 
ple-tones. 



Q. What are fhe most significant 
trends in commercial film produc- 
tion today? 

A. From it- Burve) ol New York film 
commercial producers sponsor noted 
the following trends: 

9 

1. I ntil a couple nl years ago agen- 
cies attempted to cut costs l>\ editing 
out 20-second segments ol 60-second 
commen ials to use in 20-sei ond time 
Blots. Experience ha> shown them that 
lifting out pai t of a ( ommercial for 
separate use can rarel) he done with- 
out damaging the effect both of die 
60-secorid commercial originall) con- 
ceived to permil this and of the re- 
sulting 20-second film. Toda) the 



trend is towards producing 20-second 
films separatel) . 

2. Agencies are getting hack to the 
idea ol rel) inji upon film prodw ei - 
for the < reative work. I hi re seems to 
be some trend towards allowing Btory- 
boards to grow in the producer's stu- 
dio, rathei than in the agero \ . 

3. There's a strong trend towards 
more visuall) creative commercials 
rather than a crowded series of word) 
messages flashing across the screen. 

1. In animation, three trends are 
apparent: 'li more elaborate brush 
and multiple-tone work on the realis- 
tic-type of cartoons; '2* sophisticated, 
understated line drawing made popu- 
lar b) I l'\ and exemplified hs I PA's 
commercial for Jell-0 (through Young 
Si Rubicam) ; (3j use of realistic Eu- 
ropean-made puppets in Btop-motion 
photograph) . 



Q. What tips can producers give 
for more effective I.D.'s? 
A. Simpl) tlii-: 

1. Keep it -hurt. keep it simple. 
You've onl) gol some six second- of 
audio. "*» < <u r I.I), will be most effective 
il \ iiu think of it in terms of fi\< 
onds of audio instead. It's better to 
leave the viewer with one idea than 
with a headache. 

2. I se music or a simple sound 
effect rather than main words. A two- 
line jingle is more memorable than a 
five-line pitch. 

3. Don't crowd the screen with let- 
tering it ma) conflict with the station 
call letter- that occup) 2.V , of the 
tele\ ision screen. 



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THE STATE S T A illl O N 
IflWIl I 

VHF CHANNEL Q MANCHESTER, N H 

THE BEST SICNAL— AND LOCAL COVERAGE 
FROM WITHIN THE MARKET 

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f LUS 

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PLUS 

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Total PRIMARY coverage 235,000 TV fam 1 |,rs 

BONUS COVERAGE! ► 



1 mm && '^7 - - %sjl§r| 

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h 

r ■ JUSi, GRADE A 

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LOWELL y 



BOSTON 



GRADE B. 



v«i""" * J-W&-. WORCESTER ^l^^SPRS-V " 



90 



SPONSOR 




Television-1890? 

No, it's just a picture of one of the many ways that WRGB 
proves itself a good neighbor to the communities it serves. 
Even our cameramen, above, went all out with beards, string 
ties and tattersall vests to help nearby Scotia celebrate its 
Golden Jubilee. Behind the beavers and costumes, the lads 
are strictly 1954 personnel, helping to bring the finest 
modern television to the 37 5,000 families in WRGB's pri- 
mary area. 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION, SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 



m 



Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 

New York • Cleveland • Chicago • Detroit 

Hollywood • San Francisco 



THE CAPITAL DISTRICT'S ONLY FULL-TIME TELEVISION STATION 



12 JULY 1954 



91 




The GREAT HOOSIER HEARTLAND 




SET COUNT -545,535 

(RTMA-May 1, 1954) 

• 

Grade A Coverage 
Indianapolis • Terre Haute 

Grade B Pop. • 1,922,150 

(SRDS — Consumer Markets) 




For BLOOMINGTON • INDIANAPOLIS • TERRE HAUTE 
and all the Hoosier Heartland 




WTTV Channel m^f Owned and Operated by Sarkes Tarzian in Bloomington, Indiana 



Represented Nationally by ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES, Inc. 
New York • Chicago • Los Angeles ' San Francisco 



92 



SPONSOR 



4. Avoid excessive action. What's 
effective on 100'. screen ma) tend to 
look cluttered on 75% of it. 

5. Forget about "before and afters" 
— you can't make the point in 10 sec- 
onds. Use close-up of the product or 
of a person using the product. 



Q. Are SRA standards for I.D.'s 
likely to change within the near 
future? 

A. The SRA standards, established 
a couple of years ago, provide that 
six seconds of audio out of a 10-sec- 
ond station identification may be de- 
voted to the commercial pitch. The 
call letters of the station must appear 
in the top right-hand quarter of the 
screen throughout the entire 10 sec- 
onds. Members of the 4A's are cur- 
rently meeting to discuss possible re- 
vision of the SRA standards. Among 
the suggested revisions are: (1) giv- 
ing advertisers 100% of the screen 
during eight seconds of the I.D. ; (2 I 
having the station rather than the ad- 
vertiser through the agency pay for 
putting the station's call letters on the 
duplicate negative. 



SAG re-use payments 

Q. Have SAC re-use payments to 
players in film commercials forced 
any advertisers out of spot tv? 

A. A survey of major New York 
film producers indicates that there has 
been no change in the number of film 
commercials being made. The first 
six months of 1954 were, of course, far 
busier than the first six months of 
1953. since the SAG strike paralyzed 
film production until March 1953. 

However, after the first rush of bus- 
iness following the strike settlement. 
certain facts began to emerge: 

• A few small tv advertisers have 
unquestionably staved away from film 
commercials — possibly even dropped 
out of the medium — because of the 
extra cost burden imposed by SAG 
re-use payments. 

• Medium-budget and even large- 
budget advertisers hesitate as they nev- 
er had before about discarding old 
film footage. The tendency is to sug- 
gest incorporating edited parts of old 
commercials into the new ones. 

• The SAG contract provided the 
anticipated shot in the arm to anima- 



tion. More, better and increasing!) 
original animation has been taking 
the place of the dramatic -kit t\pe of 
li\ caction commercials. 

Most of the trends predicted by 
agencymen and producers at the time 
the SAG contract was signed, 2 March 
L953 (see sponsor 23 March 1953 is- 
sue for details l. actually came about: 
(1) more table-top photography and 
demonstration: i2i fewer actors on 
screen and fewer off-screen voices; (3) 
more shots of hands only, or feet only, 
or lips only, depending upon the prod- 



uct adwi liscd i to a\ oid li.n ing to pa) 
pla) i-i - re-use pa) ments" i . 



Q. Has the SAC contract put an 
extra overhead burden on film 
producers and agencies? 

A. Film producers generalK don't 
have any more bookkeeping to do than 
they had prior to the SAG contract. 
They're responsible now as then onl) 
for the initial payment made to actors 
for their studio or location working 
time, therefore don't pay extra. 



TWO 
BILLION 
RABBIT 
EARS ' i 




■ ■ 



I ES SIR ! KID-TV can deliver your sales message 

to 1,000,000 sets of rabbit-ears (complete with 
rabbits) — and throw in a couple of flying saucers 

too! BUT — if it's PEOPLE you want — KID-TV's 
100,000 watts of maximum power (ON THE AIR NOW), 
delivers 230,000 of THEM every broadcast day! 

From 6.700 feet above sea level. KID-TV's Channel 
3 Transmitter delivers a grade A signal in two 
booming markets of Southern Idaho. IX FACT it's 
the ONLY TV SIGNAL RECEIVABLE in POCATELLO and 
IDAHO FALLS. Top programming from all four network-, 
plus the finest "Locals" ! 




1 




CBS 


I 1 




NBC 


1 I 




ABC 


1 1 




Du Mont 


■ * 




Nationally 
Represented by 




1 


GILL- PERN A 



C.N "ROSY" LAYNE, GENERAL MANAGER 



12 JULY 1954 



93 




CONNECTION 

Set for Sept. 26! 

WE'RE on our mark, set and 
ready for that next important 
step in the life of KOB TV and 
the Albuquerque market it 
serves so well! The first four 
have been historic, too: 

NOVEMBER 1948 - KOB-TV es- 
tablished; one of America's 
Pioneer Stations! 

JUNE 1952 - KOB TV purchased 
by Wayne Coy and TIME, Inc. 
Improved and expanded pro- 
gram structure begun immedi- 
ately 1 

OCTOBER 1953 - KOB TV start- 
ed serving the market from 
America's highest antenna site- 
atop 10,832 foot Sandia Crest 
— 4,200 feet above average 
terrain 1 

APRIL 1954 - KOB-TV moved 
into modern new studios! 



And, 



on 



SEPTEMBER 26, 1954 - KOB TV 
will |om coast-to-coast facilities 
of NBC — assuring better and 
timelier programs, greater view- 
ing interest and increased set 
sales in "America's Fastest- 
Growing Market!" (U. S. NEWS 
AND WORLD REPORT, March 6 
1953). 

YOUR Next Step 

to cash in on this next 
forward stride of KOB-TV 

is to contact us without 
delay! Some choice avail- 
abilities remain, but they're 
going — fast! 



KOB-TV 

^^^ Low-Band Channel 4 

ALBUQUERQUE 

A.pr»».nl.d br Tht BAANHAM CO 



I be advertising agero ies, however, 
have taken the brunt "I the bookkeep- 
burden. It is uj< i" them to keep 
ii. i< k of the number of markets in 
whit Ii .i i ommen ia] is show n as well 
,i- the numbei of times it runs, The) 
inii-i also take care of withholding tax 
..hi ..I these re-use paj ments. 

\ n tualh .«H ol the aeen< ies h Ih> re 
hea> j in h billings have had to hire 
one "i two .Hid even three extra people 
to |inli. c id. use <>t 1 1 1 « - i x ' omraercials 
and 'I" ill'- bookkeeping involved. \l- 
berl Reibling, manager of radio and 
i\ ai Kudner agency, foi example, has 
niic man working full-time on this job. 
Stan I .omas, \ ,p. of i ommer< ial i\ al 
\\ illiam Est) < ■>.. ( ui rentlj emplo) a 
niic person full-time for the policing 

and I kkeeping job, bul expects t" 

need two people in the job bj fall. 

Q. Has the SAC contract been 
changed or amended since the 
time it was signed by the New 
York Film Producers Assn. on 2 
March 1953? 

A. \u changes or amendments have 
been made on the SAG contract. It 
will In- i j j » I", renegotiation next year. 
However, nol even the mosl optimistic 
of agencymen believes that there's a 
chance "I revoking the re-use payment 
principle now thai it ha- become es- 
tablished. 

Some subtle changes in the applica- 
tion of the contract, however, have oc- 
curred a- a result of interpretation. 
Mi-. Florence Marston, New York 
i hairman <>l the S \<'. told sponsor 
ili.it questions of interpretation which 
have been brought up during the past 
j i .ii were al w a\ - settled through in- 
dividual discussion and reevaluation 
ol die contract clauses. 

< me of tin- main subjet t- that has 
• (Hue up foi v \(. reinterpretation is 
the definition of an extra. Onl) "play- 
■ i- an- subjei i to re-use payments and 
players are persons who speak on 
- reen oj persons identified m itfa the 
product. I ictras, therefore, are persons 
who don't speak on screen and an- not 
identified with the produi t. 

r!owev< i . there have been instant es 
"up - i ii. - in commen ials where 
man) persons used the advertised 
produi t on -< reen ami yet the) were 
termed extras, not subject to re-use 
payments. I In reasoning Inn- was 
that these persons were part of the 
background against which one partic- 
ular person gave tin- produd pitch. 



Anothei device used by some pro- 
dlM <rs and agencies to limit re-use pa\- 
ments lor off-screen voices i* "'double- 
tracking." Double-tracking i> done in 
the following way: One girl singer 
records a Bong on tape. The same 
girl thm re-records die harmony. By 
combining the tapes \ou get a multi- 
ple-voice effect, hut you pay only for 
one off-screen voice. As one adman 
put it: "You can make one singer 
Bound like the Westminster Choir." 
To date SAG has not objected to this 
d<-\ ice. 

Another wa) of avoiding SAG re-use 
payments has been to film commer- 
cial- outside of the I .S. Several agen- 
< ii - and producers have found that 
man) economies can he made by using 
both foreign and American actors 
abroad. Of course, if a producer takes 
bis talent along with him to film 
abroad, those players are subject to 
re-use payments. Among economies 
that can be effected outside of the I S. 
to offset the cost of transportation are 
the following: cheaper sets, cheaper 
music, the opportunity of substituting 
interesting locations for expensive 
studio set-. 



Syndicated tv films 

Q. To what extent are syndicat- 
ed made-for-tv films a factor in 
U.S. television advertising? 

A. This is the outlook for 1954: 

1. Dollar value: This year's syndi- 
cated film business, excluding tv fea- 
ture film- and film commercials, will 
be worth approximate!) s(><).000,000. 
according to estimates made earlier 
this year b) a representative sample 
of syndicators and producers. I See 
"\ ( )~i\ T\ Film Section," 25 Januan 
1954, paj:e 52. i 

2. Program importance: A recent 
\ \KT15 surve) (see Film Basics, page 
184) revealed that syndicated film 
amount- to just short of 3095 of the 
total hour- of t\ programs aired each 
week b) the average I .S. tv station. 
Ilii- figure i- highest in markets of 
50,000-500,000 population ia\erage: 

17.59? ' '■ lower in markets of over 
500,000 people (average: 18.69! ). 

A. Production investment: \- SPON- 
SOR went to press, leading distributors 
estimated that there were more than 
n i\ film series in production, both 
here ami abroad, for I .S. t\ film syn- 
dication. Sint e eat h series today rep- 



94 



SPONSOR 



SUCCESS STORY FOR 
UHF IN THE MAKING! 

In California's Central Galleys . . tv homes 
zvere practically Doubled in just eight 

months due to the advent of 

Crystal Clear UHF Reception! 

Four years fringe area reception (from S.F.) 52,943 tv homes 

EIGHT MONTHS UHF INFLUENCE Increase to 95,272 tv homes 

In eight short months Jan. I 1 954 the percentage of 
tv homes climbed from 35.7% to 55.3% 

The imminence of UHF gave promise for Improved 
Service . . . therefore . . . all new sets sold during 
the last half of 1953 were 95% UHF-VHF receivers! 
KTVU's Central Valleys have become a hot sales area 
for UHF sets . . .Proof of this is the total count . . . 
to date . . . of UHF sets within KTVU's Effective 
coverage area . . . 

NOW — June 1, 1954 — according to NBC research — including Sacramento, 
Stockton and Modesto areas— 98,100 UHF Homes — add contiguous coun- 
ties— GRAND RESULT— over 100,000 UHF HOMES 



One-Half Million 
Watts From Half- 
Mile in the Shy! 



KTVU 



36 NBC TV 

Represented by George P. Hollingbery Company 
12 JULY 1954 95 



its .1 i apital investraenl ol al least 

ol I", weeks I for half-hour 

films) and often up to 1500,000, there 
is ., total -.1 some $20,000,000 invest- 
ed in L95 1 film pi oduction foi s) ndi- 
< ation. 

I. \iiiinmil spot value: Uthough 
the I'ulk sj odicatoi - estimate 7 >' ! 
<>l the syndicated film business is • I < > n. - 
through film sales to lo< al stations or 
regional local advertisers, spot-placed 
film programs are an increasingl) im- 
poi i i nt fa< toj in national campaigns. 
Some film syndicators told sponsor 
thej were doing "80* ! or more of 



theii business direct!) with major 
agencies .in<l advertisers. Multi-market 
campaigns ol 20, 30 oi !■" markets for 
one i li.ni are not un< ommon ; some- 
i imes the total can i un as high as 80 
markets. Net value <>! this business 
(exclusive "I time) amounts, at indus- 

ti \ guesstimates, to over $15,000,1 

annually . 



Q. From the national advertiser's 
viewpoint, what is the cost out- 
look for fall in syndicated tv films? 
A. The cost trend is upward. 




Ontif TVCctieHnf Cntife 
£ick Central HanAad 



• 50% Saturation 

• Wichita Studios 



• Bonus Coverage 

• Viewer Loyalty 



For the biggest television buy in Kansas, contact the 
Hutchinson or Wichita KTVH Sales Office and see how 
you can get viewer domination in the largest metropolitan 
market in Kansas. 



CHANNEL 

12 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON - WICHITA 



VHP 
240,000 
WATTS 



CBS BASIC -DU MONT -ABC 
REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION, INC. 

COVERS CENTRAL KANSAS 



I lii. are three reasons wh) : 

1. Production costs in tv films have 
gone up for both talent and unionized 
-killed labor used in filming shows. 

Syndicators estimate that this rise will 

add "about 10%" to the COStS of 

shooting t\ films this year as com- 
pared with 1953. Since producers of- 
ten uuik on paper-thin margins, in or- 
dei lo price their product competitive- 
ly, thej cannot absorb verj much of 
this < osl rise, and most of it will he 
passed along to hu\ers. 

2. Film pricing i- also a function 
of station time. Often film prices are 
filmed as a percentage < such as 2-V , | 
of a station- Class \ spot hourly rates. 
Since a number of stations expect to 
raise their rates again this fall 
"Kale outlook," page 80), this too 
should add somewhere between 5 and 
Id', to costs as compared with last 
year. 

3. Again because of tight profit 
margin any increases in the "hidden 
costs" of t\ film syndication such as 
shipping, handling, storage, extra 
prints, sound effects, stork film foot- 
age, postal and express rates- will 
probabl) be passed along to buyers. 
This applies also to anj increases in 
sales costs not covered 1>\ sales return. 



Q. What trends are apparent for 
fall in clearing station time slots 
for syndicated tv films? 
A. Although networks have l>een 
making a concerted effort to win more 
afternoon and late-night time slots for 
network programing, syndicators are 
general!) fairly optimistic about a 
sponsor's chances for (tearing good 
time slots for syndicated tv films. 

"The situation is getting tough on 
a few of the bip ow ned-and-operated 
network stations," the sales director of 
a syndicator told sponsor, "but sta- 
tions in \ irtualK all of the top 30 mar- 
kets will still dear pood time slots for 
a -how — provided: (1) the sponsor 
will sipn for at least 20 weeks and 

preferably 52 weeks, (2) thequalitj <»f 
the show i- high enough to insure a 
sizable viewing audience. \ network 
affiliate makes more nionev out of a 
syndicated deal than from a network 
-how. and man] are not al all afraid 
to refuse network programing, partic- 
ularly kinescopes, in order to slot a 
-\ ndicated propert) .'" 

In addition to this general situation 
outlined above, there are some other 



96 



SPONSOR 



IN THE GREATER SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 
• ••you cover more on CHANNEL 4 




KRON-TV COVERS THIS BIG MARKET... 

• With a population of 3,600,000 

• Spending V/2 billion dollars annually on 
retail purchases 

• The eighth largest in set ownership 

...SO COVER MORE ON 

CHANNEL 4 

FREE & PETERS, INC. • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



BECAUSE CHANNEL 4 PROVIDES 

• Maximum legal power operating at 100,000 watts 

• Highest antenna in San Francisco at 
1441 feet above sea level 

• Low channel frequency insuring stronger signal 

• Top-rated NBC and local programs 

SAN FRANCISCO HJi 



12 JULY 1954 



97 







I . Estimate your total cost per 
print for the round trip — to sta- 
tion and return. If you know your 
total cost, enter here: $ 

If not, here's a check list of steps 
performed by Bonded to help 
you estimate your total cost. 
Enter what you think your cost is 
for each service, skipping those 
you do not now receive. 

Attaching leaders $ 

Mounting on reels 

Inserting commercials 

Cost of container, reels 

Shipping 

Print Control Record 

Confirmation of waybills 

Immediate check in on return 

Examination and repair 

Cleaning 

Removal of commercials 

Report of print condition 

Storage 



TOTAL $ 

•L. Next, estimate the number 
of prints (programs, features, or 
commercials) you use in an av- 
erage month. Multiply. Put the 

total here. $_ Don't 

just groan, move on to Step 3. 

«#« Now phone, or write, for a 
Bonded TV Film Service estimate 
and plan for handling your film. 
It costs you nothing to find out. 
And — whether your needs are 
large or small, whether you now 
do your own film handling or not 
— you will find that Bonded can 
do the job better and cheaper. 




DED 



TV FILM SERVICE 



LOS ANGELES • NEW YORK 



904 N. La Cicnega 
BR 2-7825 



630 Ninth Ave 
JU 6-1030 



FASTER, SAFER, LESS COSTLY... 

Because It's More Efficient! 



time-clearance developments <>! inter- 
est in national spot advertisers, such 

as : 

1. Spot carriers: To help uhf sta- 
tions gel .t Buppl) <<l syndicated t\ 
film-. \l P I \ recentl) proposed a soi i 

■ ■I "pay-as-you-go" plan thai is ;i modi- 
fication ul the Bpot carriei -air- plans 
of major networks. The plan ha- re- 
ceived a semi-official "O.K." from the 
Federal Communications Commission, 
ami i- likel) to In- in operation bj 
Fall. In practice, \IPI\ will give film 
tu new ulif outlets, and then Bell Bpol 
announcements in national advertisers 
which will lif aired with the shows. 
The station will designate tin- time 
-Ini- tm the announcements. The plan. 
in effect, guarantees spot time clear- 
ances in advance. 

2. / itaph plan: I hi- -\ ndicator- 
producei i- backed primarily 1>\ sta- 
tion investmenl (see storj in SPONSOR, 
1 I Januai \ L95 I. page 12 i. Current- 
ly, a total of 12 l\ outlet- arc stock- 
holders in \ itapix and the outlook is 
for 60 b\ fall. Latest deal: Parole 
Chief, a half-hour film series starring 
Pat O'Brien, i- now being offered to 
agencies for multi-market sponsorship. 

Mready, 34 stations — almost all in the 
largest t\ market- and main with top 
network affiliations — have indicated 
that the) will clear Class A time for 
a sponsor who will buy this "film net- 
work." Station reps, incidentally, get 
their full commissions on this arrange- 
ment. \ itapix expects a quick sale of 
this initial film property. "When I 
told one agem \ we could guarantee 
half-hour time clearances in Class A 
on 34 big stations." said a Vitapix ex- 
ecutive to sponsor, "the) just flipped." 

3. Rep-syndicator liaison: Since 
they are all part of the "spot tv fam- 
ily, reps and syndicators have lately 

; been taking a number <>f steps that 
will probabK result in closer coopera- 
tion in landing sponsors and clearing 
time for syndicated film properties. 

A good deal of pioneer work in this 
field has been done b\ the Katz Vgen- 

■ \ rep firm, which last year set up it- 
Station Films, Inc.. a non-profit organ- 
ization designed to act as a centra] 
film buying office lor Katz station cli- 
ents. Through it. stations increase tin 
effect) their buying power, ami syn- 
dic aim- save on -ale- COStS. 

Latest step: Di< k Dohertj . consul- 
tant lo the fledgling l'\ \P (see report 
on page 78), had planned a series ol 
meetings with top film syndicators. 



Object: to acquaint reps with the prob- 
lem- nl syndicators, and to brief syn- 
dicators mi the latest spot tv -ale- 
trend-. 

Stated Dohert) recently: "TvAB 
cannot fail to be of jireat benefit to 
the t\ film industry Bince increased 
-ale- of station time will of necessity 
produce in< reased sales of film." (Mer- 
ger of T\ \B with NARTB's planned 
promotion bureau should not alter pos- 
-ibilitie- of cooperation, i 

Q. Have reruns established them- 
selves in the tv film industry? 
A. Definitely. 

\ Mel-en stud\ la-l -unmier -bowed 
admen that film rerun- lost fewer rat- 
ing points during the summer than 
first-run show-, that the\ -bowed a bet- 
ter share-of-audiem e picture, and an 
excellent "Audience Held" level, i For 
details, see charts in Film Basic-, page 
188.) 

Due to continuing t\ home growth 
in even the biggesl tv markets, rerun 
film show- have racked up homes- 
reached scores as high a- 150$ more 
on the rerun than on the first-run 
showing. B\ and large, admen now 
judge reruns — including shows first 
seen mi networks- almost a- thej 
would anj first-run property, provid- 
ed the initial rating i- satisfactory. 

Q. Will there be more "multi- 
market" syndicated film sales to 
advertisers this fall than a year 
ago? 

A. Bv all indication-. \e-. Industry 
leaders expect an increase of some 
20' ( in sales of this type this fall. 

Here are some of the larger multi- 
market film sales in the syndicated 
field as sponsor went to pre--: 

Zi\"s two biggest multi-market deals 
— Carter Product- and Samsonite Lug- 
gage on Mr. District Attorney and 
Phillips Petroleum on / Led Three 
Lives are <:etting bigger. The Carter- 
Samsonite list will shortlj jump from 
40 to 15 markets: Phillip will go from 
23 to 35 market-. 

Canada Drj is continuing as one of 
the largest multi-market syndicated 
sponsors with (IBS T\ Film Syndica- 
tion's Annie Oakley. \ired for the 
beverage firm and its bottlers in some 
ill) market-, the series is -pmisored 
e\ ei\ -other-week b\ various local and 

regional advertisers. 

Pure Oil Co. continues it- sponsor- 



98 



SPONSOR 



AUDIO; 

MORE p«©p&,... 

WFAA-TV's nine-county TV market is 
Texas* largest — 1,420,600 people. With 
345,000- TV-equipped homes, WFAA-TV is 
your entree into 4 out of 5 of the mar- 
ket 's 437,500 homes. 

•WFAA TV Research Depl.. June 1, 1954 

...m^ MORE 'wwim 

The WFAA-TV market controls one- 
fifth of Texas' effective buying power 
with a total of $2,525,723,000. Aver- 
age is $5773 per family. 

fr^MORE... 

Comes the clincher — more than 20% 
of Texas' retail sales are made in the 
WFAA-TV market ! In 1953 retail sales for 
the market hit an all-time high of 
$1,850,450,000. Per family averages 

W6 1*6 • • ■ 

WFAA-TV % OVER % OVER 

MARKET TEXAS TEXAS U.S. U.S. 

Retail Sales $4230 $3739 +13.3 $3617 -J- 16.9 

Drug Soles 132 116 +13.8 102 +30.7 

Genl. Mdse 807 440 +83.5 403 +100. 

Furn., HH., TV ... . 205 194 + 5.7 193 + 6.2 

Automotive 902 880 + 2.1 704 + 28.1 

(Sales Management May 10. 19541 

345,000 sets in WFAA-TV's market provide 
easy access to purchasers' purses — just 
ask a Petry man ! 



VIDEO 



X 



^ 



m 



w. 



<QV<? 



IX 



lrtiif 



53 



.?^- " 



WFAA-T 



ABC 



■ . . 

RALPH NIMMONS, Sta. Mgr. • EDW. PETRY A CO., Natl. Rep. • TELEVISION SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



12 JULY 1954 



99 



I'M JOE FLOYD... 




I belong to a family of 
BIG SPENDERS 



They re the folks who make 
up the rich four-state 
money belt,* of which Sioux 
Falls is the hub. They're good 
-spenders — and always have been — 
dimply because they have the 
■wherewithal to spend (way above 
the national average). They like 
better things . . . and they look 
and listen to KELO (TV and Radio) 
to tell them what those better 
things are. Want to meet these 
brand-buying folks over a store 
counter? KELO will introduce 
you to them — convincingly! 

* Husky sections of South Da- 
kota, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska 



KELO 

and ^adia 



Channel 11 -Sioux Falls, S.D. 

JOE FLOYD, President 

NBC (TV) PRIMARY 
ABC • CBS • DUMONT 

•Wff. (Radio) Affiliate 




ship u! the Dragnet reruns, Badge 71 I. 
in '51 markets thai extend from Dululh 
in the upper Midwesl t<» Miami. The 
show i- syndicated 1>\ MIC T\ Film. 
On ili<- Wesl Coast, Signal Oil will 
sponsoi .i new CBS rV-sj ndicated 
property, The Whistler, in some LO 
markets throughout it- area Btarting 
in September. Signal, incidentally, has 
sponsored the radio version "I the 
-how (iii ,i Pacific < oasl web lor some 
I I years. 

Some others: 

Bowman Biscuit Co. i a dn ision ol 
I niiiil Biscuil i has Guild Films' Liber- 
ace in 13 markets and Ohio Oil I o. 
sponsors same syndicator's Life II iih 
Elizabeth in LO cities. I.ilivl Corp airs 
Screen Gems' The Big Playback in 15 
markets. Liebemann Breweries (Rhein- 
gold Beei I has signed for Official 
Films' Star and the Story, a big-budgel 
package b) Four-Star Productions, for 
a dozen outlets in California and New 
i ork State. Pure Oil (see above) also 
sponsors ABC TV's syndicated Racket 
Squad in a dozen markets; Heileman 
Brewing has the same show in 14 
markets. (This is just a sampling of 
the manv multi-market buys.) 



Fee tv 



Q. Is subscription tv coming? 

A. The answer is "yes" if you ask 
the pay-as-you-see people. Three com- 
panies which have proposed fee tv 
systems — Phonevision. Skiatron and 
Telemeter — have petitioned for an FCC 
hearing. Dr. Millard Faught. a lead- 
ing exponent of fee tv and Zenith Ra- 
dio Corp. economic consultant, feels 
FCC's decision mav he forthcoming 
before the end of 1954. 



Q. Is fee tv the answer to tv's 
cost problems? 

A. Dr. Faught points to the spiraling 
< < >~l> of t\ costs he feels cannot be 
paid for l>\ sponsorship only. Says he: 
"About half of tv's total income comes 
from less than a score of national ad- 
vertise] -. 

In terms of fee tv's potential revenue 
the proponents ol subscription t\ cite 
the hypothetical example of a t\ run 
of Gone with the II ind. Released on 
t\ \ia a fee system at $1 per set, 
(.11 III would gross $10 million even 



i: onl) one-third of the I .S. t\ sets 

limed in. 

Prioi to lifting oi the FCC freeze 
Hi L949, Dr. Faught projected a tv cost 
estimate into the future. Hi- conclu- 
sion at that time Btill -er\e- a- gospel 

for fee t\ proponents today : ". . . The 
■ "-i ol providing "national television 
service from a theoretical future -\-- 
tem (1 f I. (ton stations, arranged in four 
networks and programing only 70 
hour- pel week, hall network and half 

local programs, would cost $1,740,- 
252,500 per year." He pointed out 
that t\ advertisers would ha\e to sell 
better than $80 billion worth of mer- 
chandise and services annually to af- 
ford this lai gate annual tele- 
\ ision budget. 



Q. Has fee tv been tested? 

1. Phonevision, owned by Zenith 
Radio Corp., completed its latest tests 
in New York in spring 1054. The 
(inn had applied to FCC for permis- 
sion to test in New x ork over a three- 
month period. Here- how Zenith pub- 
lic relations \ . P. Ted Leitzell de- 
scribed the results to sponsor: 

"Dr. I.llett and hi- crew were able 
lo wind up the whole tiling in just one 
week. This was primarily an engineer- 
ing test performed in connection with 
WOR-TV and gave us the opportimin 
of tr\in<: out one of our airborne 
Phonevision systems a method that 
<arrie> the decoding kev right along 
with the picture transmission. 

'" I he test radiated outward from the 
Empire State Building up to 100 land 
miles awa\ from the transmitter, and 
we now know that if Phonevision is au- 
thorized by the FCC and put into com- 
mercial operation, it- program features 
will he available to people in even 
area where it's possible to get satis- 
factor) reception of regular televi- 
sion." 

2. International Telemeter Corp. of 
l.o- Vngeles, owned b) Paramount 
Pictures, ran a test operation in Palm 
Springs, Cat, in October 1952. A com- 
munity antenna was set up in Palm 
Springs, where there was one local 
radio and no t\ station at the time. 
By means of this mountain-top an- 
tenna. Telemeter piped programs to tv 
sel owner- in the Palm Springs area 
direct from seven l.o- Vngeles tv sta- 
tions. 

A. Skiatron as well has conducted 
te-t- using facilities of WOK-TY. 



100 



SPONSOR 



in PITTSBURGH 




LL 



spells 

SALES- 



W. 



hen you sell to Pittsburgh you sell to the 
nation's sixth largest metropolitan market. 
An industrial area whose manufactures top 
those of 37 states. 

When you sell to Pittsburgh, you tap the retail 
buying power of 6V4 million people. 

And you will sell to Pittsburgh, day or night, 
on Pittsburgh's first television station — 
Du Mont's WDTV! 

Watching WDTV is a daily pleasure in 

more than a million Pittsburgh District homes. 

WDTV programs are geared to Pittsburgh 
people, Pittsburgh habits, Pittsburgh tastes. 

So beam your Pittsburgh sales efforts straight 
to success — on Channel 2 — WDTV! 
First and salesmost in Pittsburgh! 



Channel 



Pittsburgh's tf-i/iM Television Station 

GATEWAY CENTER, PITTSBURGH 22, PA. 

Owned and Operated by ALLEN B. DU MONT LABORATORIES, INC. 
HAROLD C. LUND, General Manager 



2 



12 JULY 1954 



T01 



KEDD 

WICHITA KANSAS 

NBC* ABC 




97 <; OF THE 

WICHITA TV 

AUDIENCE SEE 

TELEVISION AT ITS 

BEST ON KEDD 



KEDD 



CHANNEL 



WICHITA 



KANSAS 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



Q. How does fee tv work? 
A. ^ on transmit a "scrambled" sig- 
nal iliat can be enjoyed only by view- 
ers who |>a\ a fee to get a clear pic- 
ture. Several subscription tv systems 
i exist. Zenith alone ha- submitted five 
systems to FCC for approval. 



Q. What type of programing do 
the fee tv people plan to offer? 
A. A varietj of programs that are 
current!) either too specialized or too 
expensive to be offered on either a sus- 
taining or on a commercial basis. In- 
cluded among these are major sports 
• •Mil!-, film premieres, Broadwav 
shows and possibly such cultural fare 
as special religious services or col- 
lege lectures. 

s ays Dr. Faught: "The FCC has set 
aside 250 of its allocations for educa- 
tional television stations. ... If an 
educational station could collect tui- 
tion via subscription tv for a few out- 
standing programs, it would have the 
funds to operate many more hours per 
week on a free public-service basis." 



Q. How would fee tv affect tv 
stations? 

A. The fee tv people consider the 
system an added source of revenue for 
t\ stations — comparable to the revenue 
publishers get from selling copies of 
their newspapers and magazines. They 
feel it will help all stations now caught 
in the squeeze between high operating 
costs and insufficient revenue. The) 
have in mind both vhf and uhf stations. 



Q. How would advertisers be af- 
fected? 

A. Fee t\ would help advertisers if 
it kept smaller tv stations healthy; the 
stations would be there for campaigns 
when needed — even though the nation- 
al advertiser was not regularly "sup- 
porting" them. It might be a com- 
petitor of the national advertiser as 
well, however, wing with him for some 
of the big special events and sports 
attractions tv has been carrying. 

Proponents of lee t\ contend, how- 
ever, that the advertiser has in man) 
cases already lost the opportunit) t" 
buv major sports attractions. Reason: 
Sports promoters fear loss of attend- 
ance and demand such high prices that 
only those who actuall) charge for ad- 
mission (.theatres equipped for t\ i can 
afford to buv rights to televise them. 



Farm tv 

Q. Is there any difference in the 
time buying pattern between farm 
radio and farm tv? 

A. Die heaviest farm radio users, in 
the pa-t. have used early morning and 
noontime i Class 13 or C times). But 
the trend in tv is to use Class A eve- 
ning time — to reach the farmer when 
he's done with the chores, relaxing at 
the end of the day. This is particularly 
true of local and regional farm tv 
advertisers. 



Q. Are there any special tech- 
niques for farm commercials? 

A. \\ hat works for urban commer- 
< ial- holds true for farm commercials. 
Most important point: Demonstration. 
William L. Hurlev. general manager 
of KXJB-TV, Valley City-Fargo, N. D., 
says sponsors "have to show how : 
How to kill a bug, how to cure a sick 
cow, how to make corn grow better. 
We ha\e a rule for our tv sponsors," 
says Hurley. "If it doesn't wiggle — 
put it back in radio." Hurley, like 
other tv station managers serving farm 
viewers, says television is a natural for 
many farm products "because so many 
of them depend upon demonstration 
for their effectiveness. It used to be 
that when a dealer got, say, 100 farm- 
ers to attend a demonstration of a new- 
implement, he'd call it a great success. 
Now the dealer can give the same 
demonstration to thousands of farm- 
ers — and the dealers are delighted." 



Q. What types of sponsors use 
farm television? 

A. Feed companies are among the 
heavy users of farm tv I like food com- 
panies, the product of feed companies 
is consumed every day so there is a 
\ast market to tap). Implement com- 
panies also use tv. Seasonal farm rv 
advertisers include hatcheries, seeds, 
agricultural chemicals and antibiotics. 
Clients with more general products as 
well have turned to farm t\ . 



Q. What other specialties are 
part of tv programing? 
A. Some t\ stations in big cities are 
adding foreign-language -how- and 
shows designed for Negro audit 
(See SPONSOR'S Program Guide.) 



102 



SPONSOR 



What do you want of a 

television station? 



COVERAGE? 






AUDIENCE? 




PRESTIGE? 




Operating on the low channel 2 dial spot with, 100,000 
watts boomed out from a 1062-ft. tower, WSB-TV gives 
you merchandisable coverage in Georgia, Alabama, 
Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina. (1) 
High Tower, (2) maximum power, and (3) low chan- 
nel are the three ingredients that add up to tops in 
coverage effectivity. 

WSB-TV delivers* listeners in 18% more counties 
than Atlanta station B; in 106% more counties than 
station C. In the outlying 25-74% effective coverage 
area, WSB-TV delivers 63,235 more families than 
station B, and 137,782 more families than station C. 
We or Petry will be happy to show you supporting sta- 
tistical evidence in full. 

WSB-TV was the first television station in the South, 
and richly shares the prestige of its affiliate, WSB 
Radio, Dixie's pioneer broadcaster with a record of 
32 years service in the public interest. These stations 
are affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and The 
Atlanta Constitution. Get more for your money . . . 
Get on WSB-TV. Ask Petry for availabilities. 



The great AREA station 

of the Southeast / W$D-f V 



Atlanta, Georgia 



*ARB Reception Index Study, February 1954 



12 JULY 1954 



103 



Get in thi 



Largest 


Most 




average audience, 


quarter-hour wins, 


6 of the top 10 


day and night 


day and night 


nighttime shows 




icture I 



7 of the top 10 

weekday 
daytime shows 



Most of the top 10 
daily local shows 



Source: ARB, May '54 



For the best 

exposure 

in the nation's 

number one 

market, get on 

the number one 

station: 

WCBS-TV 
New York 
CHANNEL 2 

CBS Owned... 
Represented by 
CBS Television Spot Sales 






V 



PLUS 
760,000 MORE 

KGUL-TV GIVES GREATER COVERAGE IN 
THE GREAT GULF COAST MARKET. 

'Someone will enter Houston on July 3rd to 
become the millionth resident. It's with pride 
that we mark this day, for these million people 
make up c major part of the 1,760,000 persons 
living in KGUL-TV's coverage area. The rich 
Gulf Coast market is not just Houston but the 
entire area . . . best covered . . . most econom- 
ically by KGUL-TV, the CBS basic affiliate for 
the Gulf Coast. 

So remember the million — Plus! 
LOOK AT THE FACTS 



Cumulative Totals 


Population 


Food Sales 


Auto Sales 


Drug Sales 


Greater Houston 


1,000,000 


282,642,000 


263,296,000 


35,947,000 


KGUL-TV Primary 


1,310,200 


363,764,000 


340,465,000 


46,363,000 


KGUL-TV Secondary 


1,760.100 


474,640,000 


442,737,000 


59,641,000 



Source: Sales Management 1954 and Houston Chomber of Commerce 



C^yt&b s^jesZ^ /&(?e^^6c?*C' /£j6c^ &*& /e^z^S 



Q 



KGUl'TV 

The Southwestern TV Station with the Most 

Consistent Growth 

Represented Nationally by CBS Television Spot Sales 



106 



SPONSOR 




T*« 






** 



**** 



In the Detroit «reo, CK1W-TV with iti 325,000 
watt power penetrates a population grand total 
area of S, 416, 375 in whiih 82.7% al all families 
own IV sets. Of these 1,305,520 TV families 
M.2% ore covered hy CKtW-TV channel 1, or a 
grand total (overage of 1,151,554 TV families. 



CKLW-TV 



Guardian Bldg • Detroit 



IN 



THE 



DETROIT 



AREA 




THIS WORLD'S YOUR APPLE! 



Just one from the bushel of bonus areas you blanket with WHIO-TV. 
All in addition to the 415,355 TV families in the primary coverage area, 
dominated by the World's Tallest TV Tower — 1104 feet, delivering the 
equivalent of 316,000 watts at 1,000 feet above average terrain. 



SHARE OF LIMA AUDIENCE- 
EVENINGS— SUNDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, FEB. 


14-27, 1954. 

Station D 

3.2 
1.3 
2.3 


Time 

7-8 
8-9 
9-10 


WHIO-TV 

59.99 

64.8 

61.3 


Station B Station C 

(UHF) 

32.3 4.6 

25.2 8.5 

24.2 12.2 










This powerful testimony proves that WHIO-TV's new tower reaches out — over 80 miles from 
Dayton — to grasp this ripe, rich market! A bread sponsor "discovered the new world" the easy way 
. . . opened up the Lima Territory using Kenny Roberts, made a big hit with only 3 spots per week! 
These many bonus markets plus WHIO-TV's big, regular service area add up to plus reasons why 
you should buy WHIO-TV! For more facts, contact George C. Hollingbery representatives today. 



*« 



on 



ONE OF 

AMERICA'S 

GREATEST 

AREA 

STATIONS 



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Because of the unprecedented interest in the Storer" Americana" 

ads and the requests for reprints both from within the industry and 
without, we have ordered a limited quantity and will be happy 

to fill further requests. Tell us if you'd like to receive copies of future 
ads, too, as they are published. Write or call Tom Harker. 






STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 



WJBK • WJBK-TV WAGA • WAGATV 

Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. 

WBRC • WBRCTV WWVA WGBS 

Birmingham, Ala. Wheeling, W. Va. Miami, Fla. 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. 

118 E. 57th St., New York 22, Eldorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, Franklin 2-6498 



WSPD • WSPD-TV 

Toledo, Ohio 

KGBS • KGBS-TV 

San Antonio, Texas 




you have a 
sales story to tell 

Southwestern Pennsylvania 

. . . take a look at the WJAC-TV picture — 
a mighty impressive panorama of extra cov- 
erage at no extra cost! The latest Hoopers 
again bear out the budget-stretching facts 
—WJAC-TV is 




Johnstown 

A 2-Station Market . . . and WJAC- 
TV is 'way out front in viewer- 
popularity! 

Pittsburgh 

A 4-Station Market . . . and WJAC- 
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in Altoona 

A 2 -Station Market . . . and WJAC- 
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Buy the 1 




« 



Call your KATZ man 





for full information 



116 



SPONSOR 



pjffll SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 




THE SRO SIGNS ARE HANGING OUT EARLIER THAN USUAL 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

t|. Bom; can an advertiser buy into nighttime network tv? page 118 

(J, What daytime periods are available? page 119 

|| a Will station clearances be any easier this fall? page 120 

|| B Will network tv costs be higher this fall? page 124 

v|. The tiftf dilemma: Is it the advertiser's worry? page 144 

y. I* hot uhf proposals will the FCC adopt? page 146 

|£ B W hut markets will be able to telecast network color? page 148 

U. Should an advertiser buy color tv this fall? page 148 

||. What are nettvork policies on titne franchises? page 152 

12 JULY 1954 117 



Availabilities 

Q. How hard will it be to find an 
availability on network tv this fall? 
A. The SRO signs are hanging out 
i little earliei than usual this year. 
So 1. 11 .1- nighttime availabilities on 
\l'.( oi CBS is concerned, forgel aboul 
it. I here jusl i ren i an) . 1 ou < an 
stand in line and hope thai ma) be one 
oi 1 1 1 < shows will liiul the going rock) 
.mil be junked hut even il thai is the 
ii i- unlikel) thai the sponsoi will 
give up In- valuable time period. II 
you stand in line \<>u ran be sure that, 
.it this stage, there are alread) plent) 
oi guys ahead "I you. 



Q. Does that mean there's no 
chance of getting into network tv 
this season? 

A. Nol at all. \BC and Du Monl 
will have availabilities, though the 
I'M inci has been sewing up sales al 
night nicel) and will probabl) have a 
lullci sponsored lineup this fall than 
last. Both nl these networks generall) 
attract fall clients later in the summer 



than ( 11^ ui \B< ;. 1 hi- i- because 
sponsoi - n"t able to j^et into NB( oi 
i BS ui who don'l wanl to pa) the 
program costs al those two networks 
ui who don'l want the lineups some- 
times required with < IBS and NBC 
shows will gravitate i<> \B(' and Du 
Mont. 



Q. What are some of the avail- 
able periods at night on ABC and 
Du Mont? 

A. The lalesl information indicates 
there will be al leasl one period avail- 
able mi \l!< evei | night in the week 
except Tuesda) and Wednesday. Tak- 
ing one da) al a time, here's the pic- 
ture: 

Sunday : The 8:00-9:00 period (op- 
posite Colgate Comedy Hour ami 
/ <)<i-~i oj the Town) will be occupied 
li\ a myster) show, The Mrs!,, which 
was formed) on W'i. three nights a 
week. It will be berthed in between 
Pepsi-Cola Playhouse an ' Walter V\ in- 
chell. The show is available in t In- 
full hour. I)-, tin- half hour and l>\ the 
quartei hour. You can al-< . bu) Dr. 
I.Q. al 9:30. 



Monday : The 9:00-9:30 slot follow- 
ing ' oice oj Firestone is open. You 
< an also bu) tin- Eastern Parkwa) \n- 
na boxing matches, starting at 9:30. 
[he) will he available in November, 
provided you notif) the net \>\ tin- be- 
ginning nl September. Otherwise, the 
boxing -how will be offered to \l!< 
affiliates mi a co-op basis, 

7 hursday : \ one-hour live dramatii 
-how from Hollywood i- a possibilit) 
for the ;!:(io- , ):iii) period. Program 
plans an- not definite hut thinking i- 
along tin- line- of the erstwhile IB( 
tlbum with -nine prestige -how- to 
give the program weight. Cost? In the 
neighborhood of $35,000. 

/ i I'iir, : I lie net w oik i- mulling ovei 
an auilien e participation -how for the 
9:30-10:00 slot. It'- tentativel) title.) 
Take l/\ '/ ord and will feature Jim- 
m\ Nelson and hi- puppets. I In- • "-t 
will he in the budget bracket, possibl) 
a 1 out $12,500. 

Saturday : Except tor Saturday Might 
Fights sponsored b) Bayuk Cigar, Sat- 
urda) i- wide open. This includes 
Fight Talk, following the Bayuk pro- 
gram. Uthough the fights \ar\ in 
length, tin- we!' guarantees l-'io minutes 



••\ oi<-«» of Firegtone" shi't from NBC Radio-TV to ABC Ra- 
dio-TV points up two trends: ( I ) increasing vulnerability of tv 
franchises as network competition reaches new heights and (2) the 
growing importance of ABC TV as a contender in the network battle 



.Vfoi'ilir/ of Garry HOOFS show from afternoon to morning on 
CBS TV emphasizes the web s crowded daytime lineup. Moore was 
moved lo mcke room for one of two half-hour P&G shows acquired 
by CBS from NBC. Show is half hour except Friday when it's I ' 2 hrs. 




113 



SPONSOR 



for ever) 13-week cycle. \mi can get 
it for the low. low price of $2,000 per 
show. Stork Club, which follows, will 
l>e available in segments. In the 8:00- 
9:00 period the likelihood is a music 
show featuring a different name hand 
each week. 

There are a wealth of a\ ailabililies 
al night on Du Mont. Time clearance 
is heller in some periods than others. 
Bui with the right show you can do 
pretty well with clearances, as wi nsss 
the Bishop Sheen show and The Gold- 
bergs, both of which have been locked 
in combat with Vlilton Berle on NBC. 
The Bishop has been seen on what is 
believed to have been the largest line- 
up for an\ network tv show, 169 sta- 
tions. At latest count, The Goldbergs 
were on 107 stations. 

In addition to the unsold time on 
Du Mont, there is always the possibil- 
ity of a sponsorship cancellation at 
the end of the 13-week summer cycle. 
Best bet: check the network. 



Q. What about daytime availa- 
bilities? 

A. Da\ time doesn't present nearly 



the availabilities problem of nighttime. 
One possible exception is CBS. With 
two new P&G half-hour shows won 
over from NBC the CBS T\ weekdav 
daytime client lineup is definitely 
crowded, mine crowded than it has 
evei been. !» doesn't look like there 
will be any openings for advertisers 
to sponsor their own strips on the v ■ \ 
unless CBS decides to open the 5:00- 
6:00 p.m. slot opposite Pinky !.<'<' and 
Howdy Dood) on NBC. 

I lowe\ er. ; dverl isers w ilJ find par- 
ticipation availabilities on CBS dining 
the day. The Morning Show (7:00 to 
0:00 a.m.) is expe ted to have plenty 
of openings. I I ere should be a choice 
of announcement slots on the Bob 
Crosby Show and Robert Q. Leu s, 
both of which fall in the 2:00-4:00 
p.m. period. 

NBC's lineup will change ■ ~ i < i r- 

abl\ during the summer and fall and 
a good part of it is available for spo t- 
sorship. It should be pointed out thai 
NBC is not planning to program be- 
tween noon and 3:00 p.m. This does 
not mean NBC will not sell this time 
to a client who wants it. It mean- that 



In network would prefej to sell the 
period- already programed. 

Here is a sampling of what's avail- 
able on NBC during the day: 

10:30-10:45: / Time to Lite, a new 
soap strip, which -tailed 5 Inlv . I he 
plot revolves around a young widow 
whose husband was killed in Korea 
and who goes back to newspapei n 
porting. It originates in Chicago. Th< 
program pi ice is nol yet set but if oth- 
er NBC prices are an\ indication it 
will fall between $2,000 and $2,500 

per program. The I 5-minu e timi I 

on NBC's 51 basic stations during the 
dav is s l L,395 gross. 

I l-l 2:00: Home, the "women's mag- 
azine of the air," is available in two 
ways: one-minute participations (eight 
to an hour i and 20-second pro lui ; 
news mentions. Items pro: osed for the 
20-second mentions mu I I e genuinely 
newsworthy. Total gross ost of the 
one-minute announcement i- $6,202, 
that of the 20-second mentions i- 
13,101 gross. At present the lineup 
consists of 12 stations covering about 
86' < of all I .S. tv homes. 

3:00-3:15: One Man's Family, the 
tv version of the 22-year-old radio se- 



Openiitg of Du Mont Tele-Centre was occasion for attack 
by Dr. Alen B. Du Mont on tv "monopoly,' which, he said, grew out 
of existing FCC allocation plan. (See story for Du Mont proposals 
on uhf.) At Dr. Du Mont's right is Ted Bergmann, DTN manager 



Mux lAeltmun, shown here with Belty Hutton, will produce two 
of the thres once-a-month color spectaculars on NBC TV this fall. 
The one-and a-half hour chows on Saturday, Sunday and Monday are 
partly NBC TV bid for dominance, partly to spark color set sales 




12 JULY 1954 



St'twnrli tv Comparagrttph appears this issue page 107 



19 



Clear amees 



Color: What's outlook for .v<»< growth? 



RCA 


ESTIMATES OF YEARLY 
PRODUCTION 


1954 


50,000 


1955 


250,000 


1956 


1,750,000 


1957 


3,000,000 


1958 


5,000,000 


1959 


6,000,000 


Total 


16,050,000 



FORTUNE ESTIMATES OF 
YEARLY PRODUCTION" 



200,000 
1,000,000 
2,500,000 
4,000,000 
5,300,000 
5,000,000 



17,800,000 



RCA estimates, based on private survey of leading U.S. manufacturers of 
tv receivers, are for entire industry. 

' "'FORTUNE magazine study was made early this year by Boni, Watkins, Moun- 
teer & Co., economic consultants. 



rial. Moved from NBC TVs morning 
Lineup, One Man's Fumih now leads 
nil a block of five soapers. Gross pro- 
gram cost i> s:;. ] 17 per da\ . 

5:00-5:30: The half-hour strip, The 
Pinky Lee Show, leads into Howdy 
Doody. It has no network competition 
except for CBS TV's Barker Bill's Car- 
loons, a 15-minute show on twice a 
week. It is a niusic-plus-comedy show 
aimed at both children and adults. 
Commercial format: one-minute par- 
ticipations, gross price, $1,882. For 
the 70-station lineup covering 80' \ ol 
all tv homes the gross time cost is 
about $4,640. 

These are by no means the only 
availabilities on NBC TV daytime. Be- 
sides a number of other soap operas 
there are the popular opening and clos- 
ing -h< >w - cm NBC's da> time lineup, 
Today and Howdy Doody, respective- 

ly- 

ABC's daytime program efforts are 
< on< nitrated in the morning. It is the 

onlj t\ network programing for the 
9:00-10:00 a.m. slot and it looks like 
it will have no competition excepl from 
final hour of Today in Midwest. \l'>( - 
-how in that period i- Una/, la-/ Club. 
which -tailed ,i- .i simulcast this past 
Beason aftei a long histor) on radio. 
The network had been selling the shoM 
on a simulcast-onl) basis bul thai pol- 



icy was recently dropped and the tv 
-how can now be bought separately. 
Other plans call for two soapers fol- 
lowing the Breakfast Club and it is 
possible they will be sold on a partici- 
pation basis. There is also some think- 
ing about programing in the 7:00-9:00 
or 8:00-9:00 periods. 

Du Mont i- seeking to arouse client 
interest in its only day timer, the Paul 
Dixon Show, by expanding the station 
lineup, changing the format and sell- 
ing smaller participation periods. For- 
merly the show was sold 1>\ 10-minute 
segments. 



Q. Will clearances be any easier 
this coming fall than last fall? 
A. ^ e-. 1 he number of important 
markets with one or two stations has 

dwindled from last \ear. However, 
clearance problem- are still around. 
It is hard to generalize on the subject. 
which i- made complicated by the fact 
that clearances differ by hours of the 
da) and by network-. It i- further 
complicated by the varying status of 
uhf stations, Bince the percent of uhf 
conversions differs bo much. There are 
-till important market- which involve 
clearance problems and rnan\ agencies 
-till ha\e men traveling around the 
round \ tr\ing to clear time for their 
cli( nl- -how-. 



Q. Why do agency men have to 
travel around to clear time? Can't 
they pick up a telephone? 
A. The\ certainl] can and man\ of 
them do. The reason for traveling 
around i- simpl) that in a face-to-face 
discussion with the station operator on 
time clearances the agency men can 
be more persuasive than over the tele- 
phone. When you get right down to 
it. it"s just a matter of psychology. 
And it must work or else agency peo- 
ple wouldn't do it. 



Q. If an agency has a show on 

network "A" can it clear time in 

a problem market on network 

"B"? 

A. Acs. In his testimony before the 

Senate Subcommittee on Interstate 

and Foreign Commerce, holding hear- 



PercenJ of uhf sets in markets where there are: 





NO VHF 
STATIONS 


1 VHF 


2 VHF 


3 OR MORE 
VHF 


WITHIN 

1-6 MONTHS 


79,0 


45.6 


36.2 


28.2 


AFTER 

6 MONTHS 


89.8 


65.4 


40.4 


27.5* 



SOURCE: ARB. "Variation occurs because ARB does not always measure 
the same cities in reports and above figures are averages taken from last 
four vhf-uhf studies. 



120 



SPONSOR 



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mitter site. Seattle residents constitute 
approximately one-third of KTNT-TV's 
market population. 

TACOMA: Home city of license of 
KTNT-TV, Tacoma is located 1 2 miles 
south and east of KTNT-TV's new trans- 
mitter. It is the dominant industrial area 
of Pierce County which is the second 
most populous county in the state. 

BREMERTON: Famous naval base of 
the Pacific Northwest, lies west of Seattle 
across Puget Sound. It is located in 
Kitsap County, the same county in which 
the new KTNT-TV transmitter site is 
located. 

OLYMPIA: Capital of the state, this 
famous early Washington settlement lies 
at the southern end of Puget Sound. Its 
beautiful government buildings are a 
tourist attraction for the thousands who 
visit the Puget Sound country each year. 

EVERETT: The northernmost city of 
"Middle Puget Sound", Everett is one of 
the centers of pulp and paper produc- 
tion in the Pacific Northwest. It has 
steady industrial payrolls for its people. 

KTNT-TV 

CHANNEL 11 
NOW 316,000 WATTS 

Antenna Height, 1000 ft. above sea level 



CONTACT WEED TELEVISION 




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"A" Contour Population Over 1,200,000 



UUMONT 



12 JULY 1954 



121 



^L^^* 



U% « 



and PROCESSED BY 

MOVIELAB 



'iij:^ on the ulif question, Voting I * I 
Chairman Rose] II. Hyde offered ><>me 
interesting evidence on the decree to 
which the i\ networks spread their pro- 
grams around, even where a market i- 
covered bj four stations. (The figures 
in- onl) from markets in which both 
uhf and \hl statio n- are on the air 
and an- based on the week of I U20 
March, i 

Id example: In the Norfolk-Ports- 
mouth-Newporl News area VBC had 
I; 1 - hours of programing on a \lif 
station (a CBS affiliate) more than 
five hours on (.in- ulif station and a 
half hour on another uhl station. 

\ not Imi example: In Pittsburgh the 
Bole \hf station carried M hour- of 
NBC programing, 30^4 hours of CBS 
programing, three hour- of \\\C. pro- 
graming and I I hour- of Du Mont 
programme. 



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Q. How are network intercon- 
nections progressing? 
A. Nicely. \i the beginning of -um- 
niii there wen 2'>'<'> stations in 190 
cilie- interconnected. Last June at the 
same time tin- figure was 137 stations 
in 91 cities. H\ the end of tlii- year, 
ii i- estimated bj \T\I. orders for 
interconnection indicate that nearK 
350 stations in about 215 cities will 
he linked together l>\ coaxial and mi- 
cro-wave relax facilities. These fig- 
ures include private interconnections. 
\i present there are 31 stations in 24 
cities tied into network line- 1>\ pri- 
vate facilities, usually micro-wave. 



Q. What are the problem mar- 
kets for clearances? 
A. \ lot depends on what network 
you are talking about. It also depends 
on your program. \ highl) rated 
-liow gets into the problem markets 
more easirj than one not so highly 
rated. It should also he pointed out 
thai with more and more stations on 
the ail the possibilitj of getting into 
market " V from a station in market 
"B i- greater, though overlap varies 
from market to market Some problem 

markets mentioned h\ admen are To- 
ledo. Richmond, Binghamton, New 
lla\eii. Baton Rouge, Pittsburgh, Char- 
lotte, V ('.. \\ ilmington, Del.. Tampa- 
St. Petersburg. This i- 1>\ no means a 
complete list of problem markets hut it 
gives some indication what the situa- 
tion i- like. 



122 



SPONSOR 



Q. What is the outlook for open- 
ing up important markets to all 
four networks? 

A. In some of the problem markets 
there is no relief in sight in the near 
future. A number of the importanl 
station grants are still before the FCC. 
In its speed-up polic) on granting eon- 
si ruction permits during the past 12 
months, the FCC has concentrated on 
markets which had no television sta- 
tions at all and on channels for which 
there was no contest. Now stations are 
not onl\ coming on at a slower rate 
but the net gain in tv stations is cut 
down by the growing number of sta- 
tions. especialK uhf outlets, throwing 
in the towel. Last year at this time 
new stations were coming on the air 
at the rate of practically one a day. 
During April and May of this year 
about 20 made their debut. However, 
during the same period about 15 went 
off the air. all but one of them uhf 
stations. 



Q. Are some broadcast periods 
more difficult to clear than others? 

A. Yes. The clamoring for advertis- 
ers to get into network has. among 
other things, opened up the 10:30- 
11:00 p.m. period at night, which is 
station option time. CBS got an earh 
foothold in these periods during the 
week and does not have too much trou- 
ble in clearing time for its clients, al- 
though during two nights of the week 
lineups total less than 35 stations. 
NBC, a latecomer in late evening pro- 
graming, is now in the process of lin- 
ing up stations for that period Mondav 
through Friday. While the network 
is confident it can corral satisfactory 
lineups, it is no secret it is having one 
helluva time. Among the clients af- 
fected are Lever Bros., whose one- 
hour Lux Video Theatre on Thursday 
runs into station option time. The 
show is new to NBC, having been on 
CBS previously. Also brought over to 
NBC from CBS and also scheduled for 
the 10:30-11:00 period is Lever's Big 
Town on Wednesday night. 

This points up the difficulty of clear- 
ing stations following programing 
changes. One of the reasons tv net- 
work clients go through the summer 
is to make sure they can hold on to 
their lineups. The problem is especial- 
ly critical with a program that is not 
among the top-rated shows. If a client 
has Lucille Ball on his side he doesnt 




IN RADIO! 





exas: 



CBS AND DuMONT 
TELEVISION NETWORKS 



Wickita QJalls cJelevision, Unc. 



COVER 

NORTH 
CAROLINA'S 

RICH, GROWING* 

"GOLDEN 
TRIANGLE" 




WITH 



WSJS 

TELEVISION 
CHANNEL 



*A 24 COUNTY 
MARKET WITH 
A POPULATION 
OF 1,303,700 

Sales Management 1954 
Survey of Buying Power) 




Interconnected 
Television Affiliate 



National Representative: 

The Headley-Reed Company 



have i" worry too much about getting 
his lineup back after a hiatus i Philip 
Morris, however, keeps a replacement 
for Lucy all summei I . 

\\-'i affected l»\ the clearance prob- 
lem on NBC during the L0:30-ll :00 
p.m. slot are Chrysler, which has 
bought Tuesday night, and Mutual of 
Omaha, which has bought Friday 
night. NBC's programing plans on 
Monday after L0:30 depend on the 
station clearance situation. 

There are two reason- wh\ stations 
are reluctant to carry network pro- 
graming ilui ing the 10:30-1 1 :<>() p.m. 
period. One is that the) prefer selling 
the time Locally and keeping all the 
mone) rather than having the network 
sell it to a network advertiser and 
give them only part. The other reason, 
which reinforces the first, is that the 
lime period is the last half-hour of 
Class "A" time. It is one of the lew 
Class "A" periods in which the station 
can keep all the revenue. 

Despite this reluctance, advertisers 
can often clear good-sized networks 
after 10:30. CBS has cleared nearly 
100 stations on Thursday night for 
Carter's and Toni's Place the Face. 
NBC has cleared nearly 100 stations 
for Your Hit Parade on Saturday 
night. These lineups, of course, are 
not all live. The situation is further 
complicated by the fact that a 10:30 
p.m. show, which goes on in station 
option time in New York, goes on in 
network option time in the Midwest 
where the time zone is one hour be- 
hind Eastern time. 

The post-1 1:00 p.m. period has been 
inhabited, so far as networks are con- 
cerned, only by the Longines Chrono- 
scope, which has been clearing about 
50 stations. However, there is a good 
possibility that NBC will put its show 
Tonight on the air before the end of 
the year. It will probably start at 
11:30. NBC does not anticipate much 
trouble clearing the time because, for 
the Eastern time /one. to starl with, 
the time is Class "C" and the question 
■ I station remuneration is not a- seri- 
ous as for the 10:30-11:00 period. 



Costs 



only — the color cost situation will be 
covered later — the answer is yes. Pro- 
gram costs will be up. though not sub- 
stantially. It must be remembered, 
however, that with greater audiences 
the program cost per home will not 
change and ma\ e\en go down. The 
average nighttime network show in 
May, according to Nielsen, reached 
about a million more home- than \la\ 
in L953. Time COStfl are naturally up 

with more home- being covered by t\ 
stations. There ha- been little change 
in the required network buys hut ad- 
vertisers have been expanding their 
optional lineups. In addition to reach- 
ing more home- by adding station-. 
advertisers spread their program costs 



lai 



audi 



over a larger 

\\ hen it comes to a participation 
-how. the advertiser has no control 
over the time costs but this is no Bource 
of complaint. If the advertiser 
the lineup doesn't tie in with hi- -ale- 
pattern, he simply doesn't buy the par- 
ticipation. Actually, the problem i- 
usually one of getting a- many sta- 
tion- a- possible, not one of dropping 
stations. 



Q. Will rising costs be a serious 
problem this fall? 
A. Despite all complaints about the 
cost of television, the evidence appears 
to be that sponsors are prepared to la\ 
gobs of money on the line to come 
out in front in the t\ network and Bales 
sweepstakes. The NBC color spectac- 
ulars are a case in point. Even if thev 
were not color, the spectaculars would 
be expensive. 

To a certain degree, the network tv 
advertiser is caught in a cost whirl- 
pool not of his own making. By that 
we mean network competition. NIK 
and CBS. and to a lesser extent. \l!( . 
have apparently come to the conclu- 
sion that program dominance, whether 
in the over-all picture or in specific 
lime slots, means inevitably spending 
lots of money. If anyone has any ideas 
about how to get rating- of 50 and 
above with low-cosl -how-, the adver- 
tising world i- -me to heat a path to 
his door. 



Q. How can the advertiser with 
a small budget get into network 



Q. Will network tv costs be high- tv? 

er this fall? A. There are still low-COSl -how- on 

A. Talking about black-and-white [Please turn to page 112' 



124 



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Channel 8 



12 JULY 1954 



125 



WHICH WAY IN? 




How to make the most memorable impression 
on the human mind is the subject of a now 
classic debate among the advocates of mass 
advertising media. 

It started with the advent of radio and the 
thesis that the living voice best moved men 
to action because it could tell your story with 
human persuasiveness, give it the precise 
emphasis your message required, and make 
every line a headline. 

The partisans of the printed page have cited 
arguments as old as Confucius and held that 
in addition to the authority of the printed 
word, the use of pictures could arrest, clarify, 
evoke a mood and a desire to buy that the 
spoken word alone could never achieve. 

Since the appearance of television, the debate 
seems somewhat academic. We'd like to 
participate in it, but nobody wants to listen. 
For we've never found anyone who doubted 
television's impact . . . even before it began. 

It was obvious at once that television makes 
the strongest impression. But it was not so 
certain to make it with comparable economy. 

Yet television already wins larger audiences 
than any other mass medium. And it already 
reaches more people per dollar than printed 
media. To deliver the same total circulation 
today, television costs half as much as a 
group of magazines and a quarter as much 
as a group of newspapers. 

And in all television, the network with the 
lowest cost per thousand is CBS Television 
— 20% lower than the second network. 

Advertisers, convinced that the eye and ear 
work best together , seem to have settled the 
debate with some finality. In the first four 
months of 1954, they made a greater investment 
in the facilities of CBS Television than in any 
broadcasting network or national magazine. 





CBS TELEVISION 



/low 



North Carolina's Most Powerful Station 

WNAO-TV 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

operating on 

182,000 WATTS 

affiliated and interconnected with 

CBS • NBC • ABC • DuMont 

and 
WNAO AM b FM 

*850 KC — 5,000 WATTS — 10,000 WATTS 

Represented Nationally by 
AVERY-KNODEL, I NC. 

Sir Walter Television Company 
Licensee WNAO-AM-FM-TV 



128 SPONSOR 




Herewith is the second Ana Survej made 
hy Pulse. Inc. for \\ 1 1 1 > 1 1 . Conducted just 
12 months after the first survey, it veriln - 
the dominant position \\ 111)11 holds in the 
\iu England market and brings to 16,400 
the number of personal interviews made 
during the months of January 1953 and 
1954. 

Substantial sampling is a basic require- 
ment of sound research. Too much of to- 
day's information on radio and tv is de- 
rived from an inadequate base, and upon 
these questionable data, decisions are made 
disposing of millions of dollars in adver- 
tising revenue. 

WHDH believes the industry should take 
stock of the careless manner in which its 
great force for reaching people is being 
reported. While the over-all audience in- 
creases, research companies confine their 
principal effort to an area that fails to 
reflect this expansion — listeners in the 
home; and with the advent of multiple-set 
listening beyond the living room, there are 
few T organizations who can accurately re- 
port the true dimensions of this audience. 
No other medium is so penalized. News- 
papers and magazines sell their total cir- 
culation. Radio seldom gets credit for 
more than a fraction of its true worth. 
Why not measure the total audience at all 
times? 

We do not contend that the following 
measures the total listening in the area 
covered — but we feel it is a step in the 
right direction. All facts and figures are 
derived from listening both in and out of 
the home. It is our opinion that presently 
Pulse, Inc. is the only organization whose 
methods of research accommodate this type 
of reporting — and we have earnestly so- 
licited their consideration of extending the 
method to their regular reporting in all 
cities. 

Valued opinions have estimated that in the 
near future up to 50% of radio's listening 
will be done outside the home. Since these 
are the same people who a few years ago 
were listening in the living room, we ought 
to vote them back into the club. After all. 
they're still being motivated by radio's 
great advertising force. 



Tin* answers to certain major questions were dia overed in the first -urve\ of the 25-countv 
WHDH coverage area made in Januars L953. It was the first true, total area survey ever made 
ami included both at-home and out-of-home ratings. The survey showed that the listening habits 
of people in the 20-counties outside the city area differed from those of the 5-eounty city area. It 
showed that listeners-per-hundred sets differed in the two areas; that WHDH's city ratings 
were project able to the total area whereas those of network affiliates were not protectable. 
I In- report for January 1954 has verified those 1053 conclusions. 

In addition to this verification, certain other information has been derived which should be of 
interest to anyone concerned with the medium of AM radio. Among these are: 

1. Difference in audience composition between at-home and out-of-home listening. 

2. How audience composition varies when the total audience is counted. 

3. Facts about the cumulative unduplicated weekly audience of WHDH and local 
programs of network affiliates. 

4. The continually-growing importance of out-of-home listening. 



% 



V5 





COUNTY 


OF INTERVIEWS 
& POPULATION 




\l VINE 






Cumberland 

Knox 

Lincoln 

Sagadahoc 

York 


3 

l A 

2 




MASSACHUSETTS 






Barn-table 

Bristol 

Dukes 
' Essex 
' Middlesex 

Nantucket 

• Norfolk 

• Plymouth 
'Suffolk 

Worcester 


1 

8 

% 

10 

21 

to 

8 

4 

18 

2 




NEW II VMPSHIRE 






Belknap 

Hillsboro 

Merrimack 

Rockingham 
Strafford 


to 

3 
1 

1 
1 




RHODE ISLAND 






Bristol 
Kent 

Vwport 

Providence 

Washington 


1 

1 
11 

'■-■ 




TOTAL 


ioo 







The list of counties to the left are those in the 
WHDH coverage area. Those which are asterisked 
are in the Boston City area which is part of the 
total area. The total area encloses 1,440,080 radio 
homes. 

This total 25-county area is the most important 
area of the four New England states of Maine, New 
Hampshire. Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It 
represents 71 ' , of the population of the four states, 
according to the 1950 U. S. Census. It represents 
81% of the retail sales of those four states, ac- 
cording to Standard Rate and Data Consumer 
Markets. 1954. (Thi- represents an increase over 
the figure of 73', in last v ear's report.) The 
people in this area, according to Consumer Mar- 
kets, bought six and a third billion dollars worth 
of retail goods in 1953. ( An increase of 1 billion 
dollars over the figure of five and a third billion 
dollars in last \ ear's report. I 

Therefore we believe that the following compari- 
sons between radio station- in this area is of im- 
portance !<• all buyers of radio time. 






RATINGS OF 

PULSE OF TOTAL AREA 
Jan. 1954 

MONDAY-SATI RDAY 


MAJOR 

• AT HOME ON 


BOSTON STATI 

VS. PULSE 
Jan. 

I.Y • 6:00 AM-I2:0O MIDNIGHT 


ONS 

CITY AREA 
-Feb. 1954 

AREA 






■ TOTAL 



NETWORK A 



H 




NETWORK B 





AM 6 8 10 1 2 2 4 6 8 10 1 



8 10 12 2 4 6 8 10 12 PM 



NETWORK C 




6- 



NETWORK D 




AM 6 8 10 12 2 



8 10 1 2 



WHDH 




This second report of the 25-rounty area again shows that the city 
ratings of V HDH arc indicative of its area ratings, and that the 
city ratings of network affiliates are not projectahle to the total 
area. Again the unduplirated programming of W HUH provides it with 
a dominant position, while the encroachment of other network affili- 
ates reduces the effectiveness of the Boston stations in the total area. 

In this survey* listening was reported to 51 radio stations. 24 of these 
are independent stations and 27 are network affiliates. Following is a 
list of network stations— outside of Boston— to which listening was 
reported in the area: 

CBS 
Maine 

WGAN.P0rtl.11,. I 



ABC 
Maine 
WI.AM-Lewiston 



YANKEE- MBS 

Maine 

WIDE-Biddeford 

WPOR-Portland 



tD \ew Hampshire 

WMUR-Manchester 

— 5 wTSV-Claremont 

a Massachusetts 

WORC-Worcester 
__ WSAR-Fall River 

Rhode Island 

— 2 WPJB-Provide.ice 

_1 N BC 

W CSH-Portland, Me. 
Ratine W JAR-Providence, R. I. 



\eu- Hampshire 
\\ FEA- Manchester 
WKXI.-Concord 

Massachusetts 
\\T\C-W orcestcr 

Rhode Island 
WPRO-Providenrc 



Nik llampshir 
WHEB-Portsrn 



ith 



Massachusetts 

WAAB-Worcester 

WALE-Fall River 

WLLH-I.owell 

d NBH-New Bedford 

WOCH.« est Yarmouth 

Rhode Island 

W E W-Providence 

W » O.N-VV oonsocket 



\y^^/ 4 NETWORK STATION! 

^^ >^^ PULSE OF AREA-MONDAY THRU SATURD, 



6.00 AM- 12:00 Midnight • Jan. 1954 
liy Quarter Hour Total Hating* 



lETWORK STATIONS 



WHDH VS. WBZ 



AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 8 10 12 PM 



WHDH VS. WEEI 




AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 8 lO 12 



PM 



WHDH VS. WNAC 



AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 8 10 12 pm 



WHDH VS. WVDA 




AM 6 8 10 12 2 4 6 8 10 12 PM 



6:00 AM 

6:15 

6:30 

6:45 

7*0 

7:15 

7:30 

7:45 

8:00 

8 15 

8:30 

8:45 

9:00 

9:15 

9:30 

9:45 
10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
1 1 .45 
12:00 
12:15 
12:30 
12:45 

1 :00 PM 

1:15 

1:30 

1:45 

2:00 

2:15 

2:30 

2:45 

3:00 

3:15 

3:30 

3:45 

4:00 

4:15 

4:30 

4:45 

5:00 

5:15 

5:30 

5:45 

6:00 

6:15 

6:30 

6:45 

7:00 

7:15 

7:30 

7:45 

8:00 

8:15 

8:30 

8:45 

9:00 

9:15 

9:30 

9:45 
10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11 30 
11:45 





W MOM 


AB2 


AH i 


WNAC 


DA 




.9 


.4 


.6 


.3 


.1 




1.0 


5 


1.0 


.4 


.2 




1.1 


8 


.9 


.8 


.3 




1.9 


1.0 


1.7 


.9 


.5 




3.4 


16 


3.1 


1.2 


.7 




38 


2.0 


3 3 


1.4 


.7 




48 


3 1 


4.1 


1.4 


.7 




4 8 


3 


3 9 


1.7 


1.2 




4.7 


3 


4.7 


2.7 


1.1 




45 


2 4 


3 7 


2 4 


10 




4.9 


2.4 


3.7 


22 


.9 




51 


2.4 


3 9 


17 


.9 




48 


2.0 


42 


3 2 


29 




52 


1.8 


4.1 


2.7 


2.9 




4.8 


1.4 


3.7 


30 


29 




50 


1.5 


3 6 


2.9 


30 




53 


2.1 


58 


2 3 


2.3 




5.4 


2.1 


6.0 


1.7 


2.2 




5.4 


3 


53 


17 


2.3 




55 


2.6 


5.5 


1.4 


2.3 




5 3 


2.7 


56 


15 


15 




5 1 


2.4 


59 


15 


16 




56 


18 


59 


20 


1.6 




52 


1.8 


6.1 


2.0 


1.7 




46 


20 


59 


1.7 


1.0 




4.5 


1.6 


6.1 


1.6 


1.2 




3.8 


12 


57 


1.6 


1.3 




3.2 


1.3 


6.0 


2.2 


1.1 




3.2 


1.4 


52 


2 8 


1.1 




29 


1.4 


55 


2.3 


1.1 




3.4 


15 


59 


1.9 


1.2 




3.4 


1.6 


57 


2.0 


1.2 




3.5 


1.6 


5.2 


1.6 


1.0 




3.9 


1.5 


52 


15 


1.0 




4.3 


1.5 


4.6 


1.1 


.9 




4.3 


1.7 


4.0 


1.0 


1.1 




4.3 


2.5 


3 2 


1.3 


.9 




4.5 


2 9 


3.3 


1.1 


.8 




48 


3 3 


3.0 


1.3 


1.0 




4.9 


36 


30 


1.4 


1.1 




4.7 


3.7 


2.6 


1.3 


1.1 




55 


3.7 


2.7 


1.4 


1.1 




5.9 


3.7 


3.1 


1.6 


1.3 




6.4 


3.9 


3.3 


16 


1.2 




6.1 


4.0 


25 


18 


1.2 




5.9 


3.7 


2.4 


18 


1.3 




6 3 


3 5 


3.3 


17 


1.2 




6.2 


3 3 


3.1 


1.7 


1.0 




6.0 


2.8 


3.7 


2 8 


1.4 




6.1 


2.9 


35 


2.3 


1.4 




59 


2.9 


3.3 


30 


16 




5.6 


3.7 


4.6 


2.7 


1.3 




4.3 


18 


3 2 


26 


1.4 




4.2 


1.8 


3 6 


2.5 


1.3 




4.3 


25 


3.4 


2.7 


1.7 





!In this second area report, the dominant stations 
continue to maintain their relative positions. 
Here is the comparison of average quarter-hour 
ratings. 6 a.m. midnight, Monday through Sat- 
urday, 1953 vs. 1954: 



Station 






J 953 


195 t 


WBZ 






2.53 


2.32 


WFEI 






3.99 


3.91 


\\ mm 






1.23 


t.30 


u \ w 






l.<.(> 


1.90 


WVDA 


<WI 


AW) 


1.57 


1.29 




The physical properties of two stations were 
altered between sur\ey periods — WNAC acquired 
WLAWs frequency and power (with \\ I . \\V 
call letters leaving t lie air) — and WVDA ac- 
quired the programming of \\ LAW I ABC) and 
W\ Al.'s former frequency. Tlie improved cov- 
erage of WNAC is reflected in tin- above com- 
arisons. 



TIME 


WHDH 


WBZ 


WEEI 


WNAC WVDA 


7:00 AM 




.3 








7.15 




.3 








7:30 


.3 


8 


.5 






7:45 


.5 


1.1 


.5 






R.no 


1.0 


.8 


1 3 


8 


3 


8:15 


15 


.8 


1.0 


.8 


3 


8:30 


2.1 


.5 


1.1 


8 


3 


8:45 


2.5 


.5 


1.0 


1.1 


3 


9:00 


3.6 


2.5 


.8 


5 


5 


9:15 


3.8 


1.8 


2.5 


5 


3 


9:30 


4.1 


.8 


2.1 


.8 


3 


9:45 


4 8 


1 


1.3 


5 


8 


10:00 


5 3 


1.0 


1.3 


.5 




10:15 


5.0 


8 


1.0 


.5 




10:30 


5.3 


1.1 


10 


.5 


5 


10:45 


5 3 


1.1 


8 


.3 


3 


11:00 


5 5 


.6 


1.8 


5 




11:15 


56 


.3 


1.8 


.3 




11:30 


56 


.5 


18 


.3 




11 :45 


5 3 


.5 


16 


5 




12:00 


4.3 


1.8 


1.8 


8 1 


1 


12:15 


45 


1 3 


1.8 


8 1 


3 


12:30 


4 8 


.8 


2.0 


1.1 1 


1 


12:45 


4.8 


8 


1.3 


.5 1 





1 00 PM 


4.6 


1.1 


1.0 


1.5 


5 


1:15 


4.3 


1.1 


13 


1.3 


8 


1:30 


4.0 


1.3 


1.3 


1.3 1 


1 


1:45 


3.8 


1 3 


1 3 


8 1 


3 


2:00 


40 


5 


16 


1.3 


8 


2:15 


3 8 


8 


1 8 


1.3 


5 


2:30 


4.3 


1 3 


1 8 


1.3 


5 


2:45 


40 


1 8 


2.5 


1.0 


5 


3:00 


3 3 


1.0 


2 5 


1.3 


3 


3:15 


3 


1.3 


2.3 


1.3 


3 


3:30 


2 8 


1.0 


2 5 


16 


3 


3:45 


2 3 


1.0 


2.5 


1 8 


5 


4:00 


3 3 


1.8 


2.0 


2 8 


5 


4:15 


-1.0 


1.8 


2.3 


3.0 


5 


4:30 


4.6 


1.8 


2.1 


3.8 


3 


4:45 


5 1 


2.3 


2.1 


3.8 


3 


5:00 


4 8 


2.3 


3 


4 3 


5 


5:15 


4.3 


1.8 


3.3 


4 6 


5 


5:30 


5.0 


1.8 


3 3 


4.5 1 





5:45 


4.8 


1.3 


3 5 


46 1 





6:00 


4 8 


2 3 


3.5 


45 1 





6:15 


4.5 


2 6 


4 3 


4 6 1 


3 


6:30 


4.1 


2.3 


4.6 


4.0 1 


3 


6:45 


3 8 


1 8 


4:6 


3.8 1 


1 


7:00 


18 


15 


7 8 


18 1 


3 


7 15 


1.3 


15 


8.8 


2.1 1 


3 


7:30 


.8 


2.3 


8.0 


1.3 1 


1 


7:45 


.5 


2.6 


7 8 


1.0 1 


3 


8:00 


.5 


3 8 


7.8 


16 1 





8:15 


.5 


3 8 


7.5 


18 1 





8:30 


.5 


3 8 


7.1 


2.3 1 





8:45 


.8 


4.1 


6.0 


2.3 


8 


9:00 


1.3 


3 8 


5 3 


18 2 


6 


9:15 


1.6 


3 5 


5 5 


2.0 2 





9:30 


2 3 


3.5 


6.5 


2.3 1 


6 


9:45 


3.1 


3 1 


7.0 


2.1 1 


3 


1 00 


3 8 


1.3 


3 5 


10 1 


8 


10:15 


3 6 


1.0 


2.8 


1.3 1 


6 


10:30 


2 8 


10 


2 3 


1.0 1 





10 45 


2.3 


.8 


2.0 


1.0 


5 


11:00 


2 3 


16 


26 


13 


5 


11 :15 


18 


13 


18 


.8 


3 


11:30 


1.3 


1.3 


1.3 


.5 


5 


11:45 


1.0 


.8 


1.0 


.5 


3 



WHDH VS. 4 NETWORK STATIONS 

PULSE OF AREA-SUNDAY 

7:00 AM 12.00 Midnight • Jut,. 1954 

/{> OiKtrtiT Hour Total Ratings 



•NETWORK STATIONS 



WHDH VS. WBZ 



yvJV/vVu^A^^ 



AM 6 8 10 12 2 4 6 




S\ 



10 

9 

8 

7 

6 

5 

4 

3 

2 

1 



tO t2 PM 



WHDH VS. WEEI 




-10 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 



- 1 



AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 



8 lO 12 PM 



WHDH VS. WNAC 




AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 



Hv 



8 lO 12 



.- lO 
- 9 






- 3 

- 2 

- 1 



PM 









- io 






WH 


DH VS. WV 


DA 












- 9 

- 8 

- 7 


























- 6 


























- 5 


























- 4 


























- 3 








I * 


7V7 


> 


-w 


\S 


rw\ 


> 


W 




- 2 

- 1 


AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 8 10 12 PM 



AUDIENCE COMPOSITION 

MEN LISTENERS VS. WOMEN LISTENERS 

1/ //../in • Out -of -Home • Total Audience 
61OC wi-12 <>o MIDNIGHT • MOMMY-SATURDAY 

— — — — MEN LISTENERS WOMEN LISTENERS 



AT HOME 



100 

-90 

80 

70 
-60 
-50 

40 
-30 

20 



6 — 7—8 — 9 — IO — 11 — 12 — 1 — 2 3 — 4 — 5 — 6 — 7 — 8 — 9 — IO — 1 1 — 12 





OUT OF HOME 



-100 
- 90 
-SO 
■ 70 
-60 

50 

40 

30 

20 



6— 7—8— 9 — 10-11 — 12 — 1 — 2— 3 — 4 — 5 — 6— 7 — 8— 9 — 10 — 11—12 

































^^^^^ 
































90 
80 

-70 


















































60 












































SO 




































1 


rOTA 


L 




40 
30 


















































6 — 7 - 8 — J 


I IO—1 


1 —12 — 1 


- 2 — 


a 


— A 




- € 


. — 7 — C 


1 — 9 — IO - 


1 


1 - 12 



HOW AUDIENCE COMPOSITION VARIES WHEN THE TOTAL AUDIENCE IS COUNTED 

In order to analyze the audience composition fully, total audience composition and the total audience 

Pulse broke the survey down into 3 parts . . . at-home, composition of all other stations. First, here is the 

out-of-home. and total audience. The total audience three-way breakdown of all stations at-home, out-of- 

was broken down further into two parts, the WHDH home, and total audience. 



AUDIENCE COMPOSITION 

TOTAL AREA 
Comparison Between At-Home, Out-Of-Home and Total Audience Composition 

6:00 AM-12:00 MIDNIGHT • MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 




AT-HOME 

MEN 



TIME 


MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHILD 


TOT 


6 AM 


73 


86 


9 


5 


173 


7 


71 


86 


16 


9 


182 


8 


45 


93 


11 


14 


163 


9 


34 


92 


9 


10 


145 


10 


24 


96 


7 


11 


138 


11 


22 


95 


7 


11 


135 


12 N 


28 


93 


11 


15 


147 


1 PM 


25 


91 


6 


14 


136 


2 


24 


93 


12 


12 


141 


3 


27 


91 


10 


14 


142 


4 


34 


90 


15 


11 


150 


5 


39 


84 


16 


16 


155 


6 


74 


89 


14 


16 


193 


7 


78 


84 


12 


11 


185 


8 


77 


86 


12 


9 


184 


9 


80 


85 


11 


6 


182 


10 


81 


86 


10 


5 


182 


11 


79 


74 


5 




158 



OUT-OF-HOME 
WOM TEEN CHILD 



TOT 



33 


5 




129 


42 


11 


3 


150 


49 


9 


7 


152 


39 


6 


5 


134 


48 


4 


9 


135 


58 


6 


10 


138 


41 


11 


13 


139 


44 


4 


9 


131 


40 


7 


11 


134 


38 


9 


9 


132 


35 


11 


8 


137 


36 


13 


4 


151 


34 


11 


6 


142 


49 


11 


8 


155 


57 


13 


6 


157 


56 


9 


3 


157 


51 


7 


2 


146 


39 


8 


1 


134 





TOTAL AUD 


ENCE 




MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHILD 


TOT 


76.5 


77.5 


7.5 


3.5 


165.0 


75.0 


78.5 


15.5 


8.0 


177.0 


53.0 


83.0 


10.5 


12.5 


159.0 


42.0 


83.5 


8.5 


9.0 


143.0 


31.0 


88.5 


6.5 


10.0 


136.0 


27.5 


91.0 


7.0 


95 


135.0 


38.5 


86.0 


10.0 


15.0 


149.5 


31.5 


85.0 


5.5 


13.0 


135.0 


31.5 


85.0 


11.0 


12.0 


139.5 


34.5 


82.0 


9.5 


13.0 


139.0 


43.5 


80.0 


13.5 


10.5 


147.5 


51.0 


74.0 


15.0 


13.5 


153.5 


78.5 


78.5 


14.0 


14.0 


185.0 


79.0 


77.5 


11.5 


10.5 


178.5 


77.0 


81.0 


12 


85 


178.5 


80.0 


79.5 


11.0 


5.5 


176.0 


81.5 


79.5 


9.5 


4.5 


1750 


80.0 


68.0 


5.0 


0.5 


153.5 



It must be remembered that altough the total audi- 
ence composition is numerically less than that of the 
at-home audience composition, the greater number of 
homes using radio — 20% — increases the tptal number 
of listeners. 

Here is how the out-of-home audience tends to bal- 
ance the at-home audience. In the period 6-7 AM. 
Monday through Friday, the audience composition is 
as follows in all three categories: 

MEN WOMEN TEEN CHILDREN TOTAL 



LISTENERS PER 100 

SETS 
At-Home 

Out.of.Home 
Total Audience 



73 86 9 5 173 

91 33 3 129 

76 77 8 4 165 

The period from 7-8 AM is about the same. After 
eight in the morning the male at-home audience de- 
creases considerably. However, the male out-of-home 
listening is fairly high. This out-of-home listening 
increases the number of men by 20% in the total 
audience composition. The fewer number of women 
listening out-of-home decreases the number of women 
listeners per hundred sets in total audience composi- 
tion. 



For example, here is the audience composition from 
10-11 AM. It will be noted that the out-of-home listen- 
ing is responsible for a 29% increase in men, and an 
8V3% decrease in women listeners per hundred sets 
in the total audience. 

LISTENERS PER 100 MEN WOMEN TEEN CHILDREN TOTAL 

SETS 

At-Home 24 96 7 

Out-of-Home 74 48 4 

Total Audience 31 88 7 

At six o'clock at night the audience composition again 
tends to balance out in total audience, due to the 
out-of-home listeners. After 6 PM the number of men 
listeners is dominant with the highest male audience 
from 10-12 midnight. The 6-7 PM audience compo- 
sition is as follows: 



1 


138 


9 


13S 


O 


136 



LISTENERS PER 100 

SETS 
At-Home 
Oul-of-Home , 
Total Audience 



MEN WOMEN TEEN CHILDREN TOTAL 

74 89 14 16 193 

91 34 11 6 142 

78.3 78.3 14 14 185 

From this information, the influence of the out-of- 
home listening on the total audience composition can 
be easily seen. 



AUDIENCE COMPOSITION 

WHDH VS. ALL OTHER STATIONS 



A 



VJ 






MONDAY- 


FRIDAY 






i,. 


• t hour 


neriot 


It 




N u "i hi 


r ../ 


perMont 


per loo hon 


iej 






Ulfnlrtg 






TOTAL AUDIENCE 




i 


t.hom 


<• and 


,ut-„l-h 


tune 








m linn 








MEN 


WOM 


TUN 


CHILD 


TOT 


6 00 AM 


74 


74 


5 




153 


6 


30 


79 


90 


7 


3 


179 


7 


00 


79 


77 


19 


6 


181 


7 


30 


80 


83 


19 


5 


187 


8 


00 


61 


81 


17 


10 


169 


8 


30 


59 


84 


12 


10 


165 


9 


00 


49 


80 


10 


8 


147 


9 


30 


39 


90 


6 


6 


141 


10 


00 


36 


91 


7 


9 


143 


10 


30 


35 


90 


9 


9 


143 


11 


00 


34 


93 


9 


9 


145 


11 


30 


32 


92 


9 


9 


142 


12 NOON 


35 


88 


10 


10 


143 


12:30 PM 


40 


86 


6 


8 


140 


1:00 


34 


89 


5 


9 


137 


1:30 


33 


85 


8 


11 


137 


2:00 


32 


91 


14 


9 


146 


2:30 


35 


86 


14 


9 


144 


3:00 


35 


87 


13 


8 


143 


3:30 


40 


86 


14 


10 


150 


4 00 


48 


80 


17 


8 


153 


4:30 


54 


82 


14 


7 


157 


5:00 


59 


80 


15 


9 


163 


5:30 


59 


81 


18 


10 


168 


6:00 


81 


77 


16 


13 


187 


6:30 


82 


82 


17 


12 


193 


7:00 


83 


75 


18 


9 


185 


7:30 


81 


80 


13 


8 


182 


8:00 


80 


84 


11 


7 


182 


8:30 


82 


84 


11 


7 


184 


9:00 


83 


83 


14 


4 


184 


9:30 


83 


82 


12 


3 


180 


10:00 


85 


80 


9 


3 


177 


10:30 


85 


82 


9 


2 


178 


11:00 


83 


67 


7 




157 


11:30 


83 


69 


5 




157 





SATURDAY 








by 


1 g httur 


/" f M<(/ - 




Sumb 


er of 


ficriom 


ja-r IOO hornet 






lisitninn 








TOTAL AUDIENCE 






it-home unit imt'ttj- 


home 








Ullllll 








MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHILD 


TOT 


6:00 AM 


89 


56 






145 


6:30 


85 


69 


8 


8 


170 


7 00 


83 


78 


11 


6 


178 


7:30 


83 


79 


13 


4 


179 


8:00 


73 


76 


15 


6 


170 


8:30 


68 


84 


13 


5 


170 


9:00 


61 


83 


10 


12 


166 


9:30 


57 


87 


Ij 


9 


166 


10:00 


48 


82 


17 


13 


160 


10:30 


44 


81 


18 


10 


153 


11:00 


45 


82 


21 


8 


156 


11:30 


45 


81 


19 


8 


153 


12 NOON 


52 


86 


18 


10 


166 


12:30 PM 


54 


80 


12 


12 


158 


1:00 


57 


83 


17 


9 


166 


1:30 


52 


87 


16 


6 


161 


2:00 


70 


87 


17 


7 


181 


2:30 


77 


83 


19 


4 


183 


3:00 


80 


85 


18 


5 


188 


3.30 


83 


85 


15 


7 


190 


4:00 


73 


78 


11 


7 


169 


4:30 


74 


76 


15 


7 


172 


5 00 


75 


75 


15 


6 


171 


5:30 


75 


75 


16 


5 


171 


6:00 


77 


83 


13 


6 


179 


6:30 


73 


87 


13 


7 


180 


7:00 


81 


90 


7 


7 


185 


7:30 


78 


88 


10 


7 


183 


8 00 


76 


87 


16 


5 


184 


8:30 


81 


«4 


19 


3 


187 


9:00 


75 


89 


11 


4 


179 


9:30 


88 


74 


9 


3 


174 


10:00 


92 


79 


8 


3 


182 


10:30 


92 


75 


8 


3 


178 


11:00 


89 


75 


7 




171 


11:30 


91 


64 


5 




160 







SUNDAY 








by 1 


£ hour 


period 


• 




Sumbm 


ol 


I • r *••" • 


per 100 hornet 






litt en i 


'« 






TOTAL AUDIENCE 




ii 


• home tintl . 


ut-of-k 


itrnr 








u HDH 






TIME 


MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHILD 


TOT 


7:00 AM 












7:30 


67 


6~7 






134 


8 00 


30 


50 


10 


50 


140 


8 30 


39 


50 


6 


50 


145 


9:00 


72 


76 


14 


17 


179 


9:30 


74 


80 


17 


14 


185 


10:00 


80 


80 


17 


7 


184 


10 30 


81 


88 


17 


7 


193 


11:00 


82 


84 


14 


7 


187 


11 :30 


81 


81 


12 


9 


183 


12 NOON 


80 


77 


12 


9 


178 


12:30 PM 


79 


84 


11 


5 


179 


1:00 


74 


83 


11 


6 


174 


1:30 


71 


87 


10 


6 


174 


2 00 


74 


81 


13 


6 


174 


2:30 


74 


82 


12 


6 


174 


3:00 


76 


84 


8 


4 


172 


3:30 


81 


76 


10 


5 


172 


4:00 


76 


90 


17 


10 


193 


4:30 


71 


86 


14 


6 


177 


5:00 


72 


83 


14 


6 


175 


5:30 


72 


85 


15 


5 


177 


6:00 


70 


84 


19 


5 


178 


6:30 


71 


77 


16 


6 


170 


7:00 


83 


67 


8 


8 


166 


7:30 


60 


60 


20 




140 


8:00 


75 


75 


25 


25 


200 


8:30 


80 


80 


20 




180 


9:00 


73 


82 


18 


9 


182 


9:30 


81 


67 


10 


5 


163 


10:00 


86 


66 


7 




159 


10:30 


90 


70 


5 




165 


' 11:00 


88 


69 


6 




163 


11:30 


89 


67 






156 



\U 


OTHER 


si moN« 




TIME 


MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHILD 


TOT 1 


6:00 AM 


81 


73 


4 


2 


160 


6:30 


72 


81 


11 


6 


170 


7 00 


74 


76 


14 


8 


172 


7:30 


73 


79 


15 


9 


176 


8 00 


56 


82 


11 


14 


163 


8:30 


49 


87 


8 


13 


157 


9:00 


44 


81 


9 


9 


143 


9:30 


40 


85 


9 


10 


144 


10:00 


31 


89 


7 


10 


137 


10:30 


30 


88 


6 


11 


135 


11:00 


26 


91 


7 


9 


133 


11 :30 


28 


89 


7 


10 


134 


12 NOON 


36 


82 


12 


17 


147 


12 30 PM 


42 


90 


10 


15 


157 


1:00 


32 


85 


5 


14 


136 


1:30 


30 


85 


6 


14 


135 


2:00 


30 


86 


11 


12 


139 


2:30 


32 


84 


11 


13 


140 


3.00 


34 


82 


8 


13 


137 


3:30 


35 


81 


10 


15 


141 


4:00 


39 


82 


14 


11 


146 


4 30 


44 


77 


14 


12 


147 


5 00 


46 


73 


15 


14 


148 


5:30 


51 


71 


15 


16 


153 


6:00 


74 


79 


13 


14 


180 


6:30 


83 


78 


13 


14 


188 


7:00 


80 


78 


11 


11 


180 


7 30 


78 


77 


11 


10 


176 


8 00 


76 


82 


14 


9 


181 


8:30 


77 


80 


11 


9 


177 


9.00 


78 


81 


12 


7 


178 


Q-30 


<u 


78 


10 


5 


176 


10:00 


79 


80 


10 


5 


174 


10 30 


83 


78 


9 


4 


174 


11:00 


78 


71 


6 


1 


156 


11:30 


81 


66 


4 




151 



M 1 


. OTHER 


STATIONS 




MEN 


WOM 


TfEN 


CH4LC 


TOT 


6:00 AM 


80 


69 


3 




152 


6 30 


71 


74 


2 


2 


149 


7:00 


88 


70 


4 


1 


163 


7:30 


79 


73 


5 


3 


160 


8:00 


62 


76 


10 


7 


155 


8:30 


59 


80 


9 


9 


157 


9:00 


53 


80 


10 


17 


160 


9:30 


55 


81 


8 


15 


159 


10:00 


42 


74 


17 


17 


150 


10:30 


38 


75 


16 


17 


146 


11 00 


41 


81 


15 


11 


148 


1 1 30 


38 


82 


15 


12 


147 


12 NOON 


48 


88 


16 


10 


162 


12:30 PM 


48 


81 


17 


13 


159 


1 00 


53 


91 


15 


9 


168 


1:30 


52 


80 


15 


11 


158 


2 00 


77 


81 


16 


9 


183 


2:30 


78 


78 


14 


10 


180 


3:00 


86 


77 


12 


13 


188 


3:30 


76 


76 


11 


15 


178 


4:00 


63 


73 


9 


9 


154 


4:30 


69 


73 


11 


10 


163 


5:00 


66 


79 


11 


8 


164 


5:30 


70 


72 


11 


8 


161 


6:00 


68 


80 


11 


9 


168 


6:30 


72 


80 


10 


8 


170 


7:00 


83 


90 


8 


7 


188 


7:30 


73 


84 


11 


6 


174 


8:00 


78 


86 


14 


7 


185 


8:30 


87 


78 


16 


4 


185 


9:00 


79 


83 


11 


6 


179 


9:30 


88 


79 


11 


3 


181 


10:00 


76 


85 


10 


4 


175 


10.30 


86 


78 


7 


3 


174 


11 00 


80 


72 


9 


1 


162 


11:30 


91 


58 


8 




157 



\l. 


OTHER 


1 KIN- 


TIME- 


MEN 


WOM 


TEEN 


CHtLO TOT 


7:00 AM 


90 


70 






160 


7:30 


61 


74 


4 


4 


143 


8:00 


75 


66 


5 




14« 


8:30 


66 


81 


5 


3 


155 


9:00 


78 


68 


10 


21 


177 


9:30 


68 


73 


7 


18 


166 


10:00 


76 


70 


10 


9 


165 


10:30 


87 


83 


8 


13 


191 


11:00 


70 


79 


6 


10 


165 


11:30 


73 


79 


8 


17 


177 


12 NOON 


70 


76 


9 


13 


168 


12:30 PM 


70 


79 


8 


10 


167 


1:00 


67 


78 


10 


9 


164 


1 30 


66 


82 


11 


9 


168 


2:00 


71 


$<> 


17 


R 


165 


2 30 


76 


72 


13 


8 


169 


3 00 


76 


81 


14 


11 


182 


3:30 


81 


77 


15 


10 


183 


4:00 


69 


84 


11 


12 


176 


4:30 


76 


74 


10 


12 


172 


5 00 


74 


78 


11 


9 


172 


5:30 


82 


80 


10 


11 


183 


6 00 


75 


80 


15 


10 


180 


6 30 


73 


81 


12 


10 


176 


7 00 


79 


8^ 


12 


10 


184 


7 30 


78 


88 


12 


6 


184 


8 00 


73 


86 


8 


4 


171 


8 30 


72 


86 


8 


6 


172 


9 00 


75 


73 


8 


3 


159 


9 30 


75 


67 


7 


1 


150 


10:00 


76 


78 


4 




158 


10:30 


82 


69 


3 




154 


1 1 00 


79 


73 


2 




154 


11:30 


87 


60 


4 




151 



Cumulative ratings for net- 
work programs generally have 
been available for some time. 
For the interest of the local 
and spot advertiser, similar in- 
formation now has been de- 
rived with respect to local 
programming. 

Because local programs vary 
so greatly in length (from 15 
minutes to 3 hours daily), 
"cumulative" rating compari- 
sons should be confined to 
programs within the same time 
category i.e., two hour pro- 
grams, with 2 hour programs, 
etc. There appears to be one 
exception to this rule. From 
the figures compiled in this 
survey on local programming, 
there seems to be little dif- 
ference in the turn-over factor 
between 15-minute programs 
and 30-minute programs. 



CUMULATIVE WEEKLY AUDIENCE 

WHDH AREA SURVEY 

it II, mi, and Out-of-Home 

MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY • JANUARY, 1954 












AVG. 








WHDH PROGRAM 


TIME 




Va HR. 


LOW 


HIGH 


WEEKLY 


Ray Dorev Show 


6:00- 9:0O 


AM 


3.6 


.9 


5.2 


29.4 


Ken'f Hill 


9:(H>- 9:30 


AM 


5.0 


4.8 


5.2 


12.9 


Christine Evans 


9:30-10:00 


AM 


4.8 


4.7 


4.8 


8.8 


Carnival of Music 


10:00-12:00 


Noon 


4.9 


4.6 


S.l 


19.9 


Kin:: Crosby 


12:00-12 :30 


PM 


4.2 


4.1 


4.3 


11.7 


Kami and Food 


12:30- 1:00 


PM 


3.2 


2.9 


3.4 


8.2 


ken and Caroline 


1 :00. 1 in 


PM 


2.8 


2.7 


2.9 


7.5 


Stumpus 


1 :3(>- 2:00 


PM 


3.3 


3.3 


3.3 


8.8 


2 « 8 Dal.' 


2:00- 4:00 


PM 


4.2 


3.5 


4.7 


18.7 


Boston It.illi ....in 


1 :0O- 6 :O0 


PM 


5.8 


4.5 


6.S 


27.2 


New] and Sports 


6 :0O. 6:15 


PM 


5.9 






14.7 


Itins Crush, 


6 : 15- 6:30 


PM 


6.1 






15.8 


Sports Curt Gowdy 


6:30- 6:45 


PM 


3.9 






14.2 


Hour of Stars 


6 i IS- 8:00 


PM 


4.3 


3.9 


5.6 


17.7 


2 « 8 Date 


H 00.10:00 


PM 


3.6 


3.5 


3.8 


17.6 


Guy Lombardo 


10: 15-10:30 


PM 


3.5 






7.1 


Cloud Club 


I0:30-Mldnls 


l.l 


3.0 


2.4 


3.6 


16.9 


News, Weather. Sport* 


1 1 :<)0-l 1:13 


PM 


3.3 

AVG. 






9.4 


OTHER PROGRAMS 


TIME 




Va HR. 


LOW 


HIGH 


WEEKLY 


Carl de Suae WBZ 


6:30- 9:30 


AM 


2.1 


.8 


3.1 


14.6 


Bcantovln Var. WEEI 


8:30- 9:30 


AM 


4.1 


3.8 


4.3 


12.7 


Mother Parker W EEI 


9:30- 9:45 


AM 


3.9 






10.9 


Nancy Dixon will 


<>: 15-10:00 


AM 


3.8 






10.7 


Home Forum tt 11/ 


'» :30-10:00 


\M 


1.4 


1.3 


1.5 


5.9 


News, G. Howard WBZ 


6 :00- 6:15 


PM 


3.0 






8.1 


N.-.s. A. Jackson WEEI 


6 ;00- 6:15 


PM 


4.1 






10.3 


News WNAC 


6 :00- 6:15 


PM 


2.9 






6.8 


Sports. Leo Egan WBZ 


6:15- 6:30 


PM 


3.0 






6.7 


Sports Roundup WNAC 


6:15- 6:30 


PM 


2.4 






5.9 


Sports, F. Cusick WEEI 


6:30- 6:45 


PM 


3.4 






8.2 



THE UNDCPLICATED AUDIENCE OF BLOCK PROGRAMMING 

From the above tabulation it is evident that WHDH's The accompanying graph shows the comparison be- 

block programming reaches a sizable portion of the tween the Ray Dorey Show over WHDH from 6:00 to 

radio audience. Taking the 1.440.080 radio homes in 9:00 AM and the Cari deSuze show over WBZ from 

the WHDH area, and projecting the cumulative undu- 6:30 to 9:30 AM. These two programs are both three 

plicated weekly ratings of block programs of over one hours in length and both are disc jockey programs, 
hour in length, we find the number of radio homes 
which listen one or more times a week to WHDH 
programs. 



TIME 

6-9 AM 
10-12 Noon 
2-4 PM 
4-6 PM 
6:45-8 PM 
8-10 PM 



PROGRAM 

Ray Dorey Show 
Carnival of Music 
2*8 Dale 
Boston Ballroom 
Dour of Stars 
2 & 8 Date 



l MHJPLI- 

CATF.D 
WEEKLY 
RATING 

29.4 
19.9 
18.7 
27.2 
17.7 
17.6 
16.9 



NO. RADIO 

HOMES 
PER WEEK 

423,383 
286.575 
269.294 
391,701 
254,894 
253,454 
243,373 




10:30-12 Mid Cloud Club 

From the above figures, it is evident that one WHDH 
program is heard one or more times a week. Monday 
through Friday, by 423.383 radio homes in the area. 
We believe we could arrive at a much higher number 
of the radio homes that li-ten to WHDH one or more 
times a week if we had de>igned the survey as a popu- 
larity contest. However, such was not our purpose. We 
wished to discover facts about radio listening that 
Would be important to the medium as a whole as 
well as to ourselves. 



2 9.4 






UNDUPL1CATED 

WEEKLY 

RATING 


2.1 


3.6 AVERAGE Vi HR. RATING 



R\^ DOREY 
W 1IDH 
6-9 AM 



VS 



CARL DE SLZE 

WBZ 
6:30-9:30 AM 



THK I NDL PLICATED AUDIENCE OF NEWS AM) SPORTS PROGRAMS 



Newa and -|t(»rl- program! ..f W HDH and the network 

affiliates art- comparable. We have compared tin- 6 
o'clock news, and the -port-, programs which an- of 

fifteen minutes duration and run either from 6:15 to 
6:30 I'M or from between 6:30 and 6:45 P.M. 



« EEKLY 

CI Ml I.ATIVE 

RATING 

POINTS 

(S Timr. 
V>. ', llr. 
Riling) 



STATION 

NX 111)11 

WEE1 

WBZ 

WW! 



AY. '« UK. 
RATING 

5.9 
4.1 
3.0 
2.9 



I NDI PI I. 

< \teu 
WEEKLY 

RAIINf. 

14.7 
10.3 

8.1 

6.8 



TOTAI R\l)IO 

HOMES PER 

» IKK 

211,771 

148,328 

I 1 6,646 

97,923 



The accompanying bar-graph show- the comparison 
between new- programs on the four stations. 

WHDH <«t.->. i,> 

^ EEI (6 :. •10.1.1 > 
WBZ (f) : 11..IO) 

w \\<: i« i. -...km 

The graph of sport- programs would approximate that 
of the news programs. 




I ndi PLICATED 
WEEKLY 

K VMM. 



5.9 


14.2 


204,491 




3.4 


8.2 


1 1 8,086 


AVERACI 


3.0 


6.7 


96,483 


\ lll(. K \ I INC 


2.4 


5.9 


84,964 






We should like to make a comparison of the "2 & 8 
Date". This is a four-hour program, divided into two 
parts: one part in the afternoon from 2-4 P.M. the 
other part in the evening from 8-10 PM. The program 
shows up as follows: 





UNDUPLI- 






CATED 


TOTAI. RADIO 


AV. 'A HR. 


WEEKLY 


HOMES PER 


RATING 


RATING 


WEEK 


4.2 


18.7 


269,294 


3.6 


17.6 


253,454 



Afternoon 2-4 PM 
Evening 8-10 PM 

It can be seen from this that the program reaches al- 
most as many unduplicated listeners in the evening 
hours as it does in the afternoon hours. And in the 
evening time from eight to ten, "2 to 8 Date" is faced 
with the toughest network and television competition 



in the area. There follows a graph illustrating the 
comparison : 




AFTERNOON 
2-1 PM 



the continually-growing importance of the olt-ofhome audience 




Back in January 1948. little importance was attached 
to the OUt-of-home audience. It was not until the sum- 
mer of 1948 that WHDH did its first OUt-of-home sur- 
vey. The Pulse of Boston Average *4 Hour Homes 
Using Radio figure in January-February 1948 was 23.0 
for the entire week. The January 1951 WHDH Area 
Survey s|i.,\\s a total average sets in u-.- seven days a 
week t<> be 23.76. If the out-of-home audience wen- to 
be discounted, the Homes Using Radio figure would be 
only 19.47, or 18*^ of the total audience would !><• dis- 



counted. Or. as is shown on the following table, many 
thousands of listeners would not be counted. The 
tabulation for Sunday through Saturday is broken 
down into three periods — 6 AM-12 Noon, 12 Noon-6 
P.M. 6 PM-12 Midnight. 



AT-HOME 



OUT-OF-HOME 

A, 



homcf 1 i>Mirr« Tntal Total 

uoirix prrlOO ll-trn- Timr li-trn- 

radio ,r|s « r* rr- 

1H..1I 1.1H 121. Hit 6 AM-12 N 79.273 

21.11 1.11 lr.H.72.1 12 N-6 PM 91. .129 

19.19 1HO 195,0*9 6 PM-12 M 8<..2.17 



I.i.lrnrr, I.....,,. 

per u»injt 

llto.rl. radio 

IS9 3.91 

I t<) t.S3 

119 I CP2 



















RATING POINTS— PROJECTED 


TO RADIO HOMES 










BASED ON 1,440,080 IN 


WHDH AREA 










AND COST 


PER THOUSAND PER SPOT ANNOUNCEMENTS AS INDICATED 








PROJECTED 












■H RATING 


TO RADIO 












POINTS 


HOMES 


SIS 8SO 922 


*■£<> »ao 








1 


14,400 


1.04 138 152 


1.80 2.08 


3.12 


3.47 




1.1 


15,840 


.94 126 1.39 


1.64 198 


2 82 


3.15 




1.2 


17,280 


.87 1,15 1.27 


1.50 1.74 


2 61 


2.89 




1.3 


18,720 


.80 106 1.17 


1.38 160 


2.40 


2.67 




1.4 


20,160 


.74 .99 1.09 


1.28 148 


2.22 


2.48 




1.5 


21,600 


.69 -92 1.01 


1.20 1.38 


2.07 


231 




1.6 


23,040 


.65 -87 .95 


1.12 1.30 


1.95 


2.17 




1.7 


24,480 


.61 81 .89 


1.06 1.22 


1.83 


2.04 




1.8 


25,920 


.57 77 84 


1.00 1.14 


1.71 


1.95 




1.9 


27,360 


.54 73 80 


.95 1.08 


1.62 


L82 




2.0 


28.800 


.52 69 .76 


.90 1.04 


156 


1.73 




2.1 


30,240 


.49 66 .72 


.85 .98 


1.47 


1.65 




2.2 


31,680 


.47 -63 .69 


.82 .94 


1.41 


1.58 




2.3 


33.120 


.45 -60 .66 


.78 .90 


1.35 


1.50 




2.4 


34.560 


.43 58 .63 


.75 .86 


1.29 


1.44 




2.5 


36,000 


.41 55 .60 


.72 .82 


1.23 


1.38 




2.6 


37,440 


.40 -53 58 


69 .80 


1.20 


1.33 




2.7 


38,880 


.38 51 .56 


.66 .76 


1.14 


1.28 




2.8 


40,320 


.37 -49 .54 


.64 .74 


1.11 


1.24 




2.9 


41,760 


.35 .47 .52 


.62 70 


1.07 


1.19 




3.0 


43,200 


.34 -46 .50 


.60 .69 


1.04 


1:15 




3.1 


44,640 


.33 .44 .49 


.58 .66 


.99 


1.12 




3.2 


46.08P 


.33 43 .47 


.56 65 


.97 


1.08 




3.3 


47,520 


.31 -42 .46 


.54 .62 


.94 


1.05 




3.4 


48,960 


.30 .42 .44 


.53 .61 


.91 


1.02 




35 


50,400 


.29 39 .43 


.51 .58 


.87 


.99 




3.6 


51,840 


.28 38 .42 


.50 .57 


.85 


.96 




3.7 


53,280 


.28 .37 .41 


.48 .56 


.84 


.93 




3.8 


54,720 


.27 -36 .40 


.47 .54 


.81 


.91 




3.9 


56,160 


.26 -35 .39 


.46 .53 


.80 


.89 




4.0 


57,600 


.26 .34 .38 


.45 .52 


.78 


.86 




4.1 


59,040 


.25 -33 .37 


.44 .50 


.75 


.84 




4.2 


60,480 


.24 .33 .36 


.43 .49 


.73 


.82 




4.3 


61,920 


.24 -32 .35 


.42 .48 


.72 


.80 




4.4 


63,360 


.23 -31 .34 


.41 .47 


.70 


.79 




4.5 


64,800 


.23 -30 .33 


.40 .46 


.69 


.77 




4.6 


66,240 


.22 -30 .33 


.39 .45 


.67 


.75 




4.7 


67,680 


.22 -29 .32 


.38 44 


.66 


.73 




4.8 


69,120 


.21 29 .31 


.37 43 


.64 


.72 




4.9 


70,560 


.21 28 .31 


.36 .42 


.63 


.70 




5.0 


72,000 


.20 -27 .30 


.36 .41 


62 


.69 




5.1 


73,440 


.20 -27 .29 


.35 .40 


.61 


.68 




5.2 


74,880 


.20 26 .29 


.34 .40 


60 


.66 




53 


76.320 


.19 .26 .28 


.34 .39 


58 


.65 




5.4 


77.760 


.19 -25 .28 


.33 .38 


57 


.64 




5.5 


79,200 


.18 -25 .27 


.32 .37 


56 


63 




5.6 


80,640 


.18 -24 .27 


.32 .37 


55 


.61 




5.7 


82,080 


.18 24 .26 


.31 .36 


54 


.60 




58 


83,520 


.17 -23 .26 


.31 .35 


.52 


.59 




59 


84,960 


17 .23 .25 


.30 .35 


.52 


.59 




6.0 


86,400 


.17 -23 .25 


.50 .34 


.52 


58 .. 




6.1 


87.840 


.17 -22 .25 


.29 .34 


.51 


.56 / 


' J 


6.2 


89,280 


.16 -22 .24 


.29 .33 


.49 


.56 . s 


"£ 


6.3 


90.720 


.16 .22 .24 


.28 .32 


.49 


55 [ 


6.4 


92,160 


.16 -21 .23 


.28 .32 


.48 


.54 I . 


f 


6.5 


93,600 


.16 .21 23 


.27 .32 


.48 


.53 y 


^ 


6.6 


95,040 


15 -21 23 


.27 .31 


.47 


.52 \ 




6.7 


96,480 


.15 -21 22 


.26 .31 


.46 


.51 




6.8 


97,920 


.15 21 .22 


.26 .30 


.45 


.51 




6.9 


99,360 


.15 20 .22 


.26 .30 


.45 


.50 




7.0 


100,800 


.14 -19 .21 


.25 .29 


.44 


.49 






In one i>l iii- essays, ' larence Daj wrote 
about what would happen if this 
civilization were to !>«■ destroyed and die 
archaeologists "I anothei civilization were 

to uncover the ruins. \li. I)a\ claimed 
thai the clock would be looked upon then 
as we now look upon the "lares et penal' - 
of ancient Home. (For those who 
flunked Latin . . . "household gods**.) 
If Mr. Day were alive and writing toda\. 
he'd < all the clock the "lares" and the 
radio the "penates". l'rai ticalK ever) 
home that has a timepiece has a radio. 
I here are perhaps as many models of 
radios as there are ol clocks . . . and maybe 
the wrist radio will be worn on the 
opposite aim lion i the wrist watch in 
the not-too-distant future. 
In New England, 98.6 of the homes have 
radios, according to Standard Rate and 
Data Consumer Market-. 1954, and the 
figure carries over into the 25 count) 
WIIDH coverage area. From studies by 
I! \B, it is evident that the radio i> not 
confined to any one room in the house, 
nor is radio confined to the household 
itself. Radio i> mobile. It travels with 
the listener, whether in the automobile, 
in the back or front yard, at a restaurant 
or tavern, at the heach, on a picnic, 
Bkiing, skating, or at work. 
In fact, radio is man's constant companion. 
He leans on it for news and information, 
for music, weather, and entertainment. 

Radio is the companion of the shut-in 
and the traveler, of the young and old. of 
the urban, suburban and rural resident. 
I)air\ farmers listen to radio in their 
barns. Sheep herders hear it on the hills 
and mountains. The yachtsmen would be 
tosl without it. Yes. the radio, once 
confined to the living room, now en- 
COmpassee the world of modern man. In 

fact, onlj one item of our civilization 
exceeds the circulation of radio . . . and 
that i- the medium of exchange . . . money. 












y^ 



PRODUCT a»,i SERVICE 
REACH A NEW HIGH! 



Wi 



ith each succeeding year BMI's products and services 
attain new highs in volume and value. 

The large and growing catalog of BMI-licensed music in all 
classes — popular, folk, standard, symphonic, operatic, educational 
— gives continuing evidence of the quality and ability of the com- 
posers and publishers affiliated with BMI. 

BMI Service, too, is reaching new highs. BMI not only serves its 
broadcast licensees — AM, FM and TV — with a steady flow of 
practical program aids, but provides its repertoire and facilities 
to every user of music . . . ballrooms, night clubs, motion pictures, 
hotels, restaurants, skating rinks, amusement parks, wired music, 
industrial plants, symphony orchestras, chamber music groups, 
choirs and choruses, motion picture exhibitors using intermission 
music and many others. 

BMI-licensed pop song hits are maintaining leading positions in 
all of the music trade popularity charts — the Hit Parade, the 
Variety scoreboard, Billboard charts, Downbeat polls, the every- 
day best-seller lists — and, for the past four consecutive years, 
were voted Number One in all categories by the nation's juke 
box operators in the Annual Cash Box Popularity Poll. 

In the field of Concert Music, BMI continues to foster composition 
and encourage public interest through its annual Student Com- 
posers Radio Awards, its support of the American Composers 
Alliance, and the extensive publication of Concert Music through 
its wholly owned subsidiary, Associated Music Publishers, Inc. 

Similar BMI services and efforts in the entire field of music are 
being conducted throughout the Provinces of Canada by BMI 
Canada Limited. 



Your BMI Field Representative, who visits your station periodically, can be 
helpful in many ways. For any personal problem in selecting or program- 
ming music send your inquiry to BMI's Station Service Department. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 



589 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO* MONTREAL 



12 JULY 1954 



141 



WFBC-TV 

100KW POWER 
2204 FT. ANTENNA 

"Giant of 

Southern 

Skies" 





s 






TENN. 

KNOXVIUEy 




• " 


. N. C. 




ASHEVILLE 


V CHARLOTTE 




' . # SPAR 
*GREENV 
• 
ANDERSON 


IANBURG 


lJ \ 






• COLUMBIA X>^-" 


AUGUSTA »\ 


S. C. ///// 




GA. \ 


^y 



. . . boasting mor< people and largei 
income within ion miles radius than 
Atlanta, [acksonville, Miami, 01 New 
< )i leans, WFB( I \ is truly the "Giant 
of Southern skies", and a powerful 
new advertising medium in (he South- 
east. 

HERE'S THE WFBC-TV 
MARKET 
(Within 100 miles radius) 
Population 2,924,625 People 
Income $3,174,536,000 

Sales $2,112,629,000 

Television Homes 277,622* 

Market Data from Sales Management 
*From A. C. Nielsen Co. Survey as of 
Nov. 1. 1<).~).5. ph.- RETMA sel shipments 

ii' lli> 1(10 m\. < < > 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 -inir \n\. I. 1953. 

Wnii now tin Market Data Brochure 
and linlr Card. tsk US m "iii Repre- 
sentatives l"> information mid assist- 
ant 1 . 



Channel 4 

WFBC-TV 

Greenville, S. C. 



NBC NETWORK 
Represented Nationally by 

WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



NETWORK TV 
[Continued from page 121 1 

the networks. Du Mont specializes in 
them, loi example, you can Inn a 15- 
minute evening — 1 1 if* on Du \1<mt at 
7:01) ,,. ni. I,,, onlj $5,000 a week. The 
program, \farge and Jeff, is a situation 
comedy. I Advertisers with an eye on 
off-beal programing techniques Bhould 
In- interested in this show. It i- ad lib. i 
rhere are other low-cosl shows, t"<>. 

The participation shows arc anothei 
wa\ of getting into network t\ with a 
-mall wallet. I b.ej should I"- "I spe- 
cial interest i" clients with products 
aimed at women since most of the par- 
ticipation shows are "ii during tin- day. 
Houi'MM. men can he reached before 
the) ^ < > in work on either NBC's Today 
or CBS' Vnniinii Slum. 

There are a few participations at 
night {Your Show oj Slum \. which 
sold LO-minute segments, is dead but 
the stars. Sid Caesar and Imogene 
Coca, an- carrying participations on 
their new, separate shows). There are 
also devices which get prett) close to 
the participation format. Du Mont's 
cosponsorship method, used on two 
shows b) American Chicle this past 
season, offers 15-minute segments for 
sale in half-hour -how-, and there is 
alternate-week -j n >n-> > i -Ii i | • also. 

The alternate-week, or "major-mi- 
nor, technique provides every-week 
exposure to the client for a little more 
than hall the cost ol e\er\-week spon- 
sorship. Ilach client nets most of the 
commercials one week, only one men- 
tion on (he alternate week. Kach al- 
ternate-week client can Use the show 
title with his companx nan r prod- 
uct in it. 

The alternate-week adxertisini: meth- 
od is used lor other reasons besides 
just saving money. \ client who in- 
vests in two alternate-week shows rath- 
er than one every-week show reaches 
man) more different homes at onl) 
slightl) more cost. Main client- go t" 
alternate weeks and throw the inon- 
c\ saved into an expanded lineup. This 
reason ha- Keen growing inure and 
more important 

rhere appears to he a definite trend 
in alternate-week sponsorships. On 
\ li< !'s Saturda) night lineup alone 

there will he four new allei nalc-w eek 

sponsors. Green Giant and Pillsbur) 
will -l.arc time on the new filmed 
Mi 'se\ Roone) -h"u. Armour and an- 
othei sponsor will alternate in the 



10:00-10:30 p.m. slot. The other Bpon- 
boi will probabl) be a cosmetic firm. 
It i- interesting to aote that the al- 
ternate-week program two different 
-how- alternating in the Bame time 
period never caught on. Every-week 
-how- appear to hold their audiences 
bettei . 



Q. Are there any important 
changes in program production 
costs? 

A. I nion produ< tion < (,-t- w ill be 
about T'< highei >>n the t\ networks 
this coming fall. This is the result 
ol - ontra< t- negotiated during this 
past season. They will carr\ over at 
least until next year. There are also 
negotiations going on now which will 
alfc< t program costs. > h.r complete 
detail- on union contracts, see the re- 
port on Tv union-, page 1~>2. i Expec- 
tation fni the future i- that < o-t in- 
i reases in the union held will level off. 

One of the most important chai 
in the program production cost picture 
i- NBC IV- new rate structure cover- 
ing both black-and-white and color 
production and service facilities. The 
new rate structure establishes hourlx 
rate- (.ii studios and technical person- 
nel in place of the "package" rates 
charged previously. It became effec- 
tive 1 Julx. 

The highpoints of the new rate man- 
ual, as outlined hx NBC President Syl- 
vester W eaver are: 

1. Bx placing a premium <>n effi- 
i ienc) in using studios and personnel, 
the advertiser is offered more oppor- 
tunity to control and reduce his tele- 
\ ision production costs. 

2. The new rates eliminate separate 
charges for camera rehearsal and drx 
rehearsal. The advertiser i- charged 
for total time in the studio, beginning 
with dry rehearsal and camera set-up 
and continuing through to the end of 
the broad* ast. 

A. Personnel charges are the same 
for color and b&w broadcasts. Man- 
powei COStS "ill be determined hx the 

numbei of men used and the length 
of time the) are used. Extra color 
charges are made for studios, mobile 
unit- and extra equipment. 

1. For the first time there will he a 

charge for him origination. 

The film origination charge, which 
applies t<> programs produced predom- 
inantly on film, i> $250 net per quar- 
ter hour, which include- a pre-broad- 



142 



SPONSOR 



Decide on the Network with Lowest Time Costs 




NO "MUST-BUY" PROGRAMS 

Du Mont availabilities let you "buy" or 
build and become the sole sponsor of 
a program that meets your selling needs. 



• LOWER PRODUCTION COSTS 

Your savings at Du Mont on production 
facilities result in more money 
available for time buys. 



TIME PERIOD PROTECTION 

The DuMont Television Network has always 
protected its sponsors. When you decide 
on DuMont you have a time franchise. 



YOU'RE WISE TO DECIDE ON THE 

oil Mont 

TELEVISION NETWORK 

515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2600 
435 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 11, III. MO 4-6262 

A Division of The Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories, Inc. 



12 JULY 1954 



143 



. .i-i i mi -through nol to ex< eed the 
amount "I air time. 

\i;< : I \ issued a new production 
rate manual 1 February. It applies to 
programs originating in New York, 
( In. ago, I 08 Angeles and San Fran- 
cis* 0. Main Features of the manual. 

a. cording t<> VB( !, are I I I greater 
Bexibilirj in the use of various Berv- 
ic es, I 2 i elimination of premium time 
charges i"i camera and <lr\ rehearsal, 
(3) \>i<<\ ision for discounts, penalties 
and deadlines on all orders for produc- 
tion services and i I) establishment oi 
standardized rates foi all Facilities and 
production sen i« i s. 



Q. How do the new NBC produc- 
tion rates compare with the old 
ones? 

A. \dverli-er- who haven't had a 
chance to estimate what effect the new 
NBC production rales will have on 
their shows will be interested in this 
comment from a program production 
executive at one of the top tv agencies: 

"We have made some comparisons 
of the old and new rates on sonic of 
our shows and found that our costs 
will be about the same. I'm talking 
about live, black-and-white shows 
which are put on in the same manner 
as in the past. It may not be that wa\ 
for all shows on tv. Its possible that 
some will cost more but the important 
thing is that if program production is 
planned intelligently there are lots of 
ways to save money. It might be a lit- 
tle confusing when first using the new 
manual because agcnc\ production peo- 
ple will have to get used to figuring 
out exaelh how mam technicians to 
use." 

The new manual cannot be com- 
pared directl) with previous one since 
units o| use are not comparable. 



I hi 

Q. Does the advertiser have any 
direct interest in the solution of 
the uhf problem? 

A. Ileceitainlv does. Willi the pros- 
pering of uhf and a truly national. 

competitive television service he will 
paj less i"i television advertising than 
he otherwise would. In other words, 
the more stations there are. the more 

competition there will he. More com- 
petition usually mean- lower prices. 
It is true that from the point of view 
of broadcasters, an excess of competi- 
tion can he harmful to the industry. 
Hut that is a pretty academic possibil- 
ii\ right now. excepl in New York 
and Los \ngeles. where nine of the 

II stations are said to operate in the 
red. 

Some figures on how competition 
affects time costs were gathered last 
fall h\ l)u Mont. These figures show 
that in a majority of the one- and two- 
station pre-freeze markets cost-per- 
1.000 tv homes for time ranged from 
$1.75 to $2.60. Not a -ingle three- or 
four-station market had an average 
rate of more than SI. 75. 



Q. What is the status of uhf at 
present? 

A. As of 1 June there were 238 uhf 
authorizations outstanding and 122 
uhf stations on the air. There were 
58 channels in 37 of the top 100 mar- 
kets for which no application had 
been filed. In addition to a long list 
of uhf applicant- who returned their 
construction permit- before getting in- 
to operation 14 uhf stations have been 
on the air and have suspended opera- 
tions. This figure compare- with three 
\hf station- which have suspended op- 



SWITCH FROM STILL SLIDES! 



i'-\ 



-^1 



SHM 



Start VAinf 



SLIDES °N FILM 



FULL OF ACTION! THEY ZOOM, 
FLASH. SPIN, ROLL and BURST! 



FILMACK STUDIOS 

13 31 So. Wabash Chicago, III. 



C. 



v 



SKN " IS A 
T RUL ORDFR' i 
LflHorHsFpy,^; 1 



eiation- -incc commercial television 
began to expand in 1946. The CBS- 
Nielsen t\ Bet count la-t year showed 
1,774,690 uhf families out of a total 
of 27,506,500 i\ families as of 1 No- 
vember L953. 



Q. What is the nature of the uhf 
problem ? 

A. I he problem is a complicated one 
hut. perhaps, it can be reduced to 
three points: 1. I hf i- a latecomer 
to the television scene and uhf station- 
musl compete against entrenched \hf 
broadcasters. Hence, man) of them 
are losing mone\ . 

2. Uhf is not vet fullv developed 
technically. The effect i- that, under 
comparable conditions, a uhf signal 
cannot always cover as well a< a vhf. 
Since uhf operator- cannot reach as 
man) people as competitive vhf out- 
let-, the advertiser a- well as the net- 
work prefer joining force- with the vhf 
station. 

3. I hf signals cannot be received 
on vhf sets. The conversion of a vhf 
set to receive a uhf signal costs mone) 
and where a set owner i- already satis- 
fied with existing vhf station fare, he 
ma) not want to spend the monev. 
Here again, the uhf outlet suffer- re- 
garding circulation compared with the 
vhf competition. The \icious circle 
operate-: No conversion, no network 
affiliation. No network affiliation, no 
network programing. No network pro- 
graming, no inducement to convert. 
\n conversion . . . etc. And. of course, 
no business. 



Q. Are all uhf stations having 
circulation trouble? 

A. No. The less uhf-vhf station in- 
termixture there is. the greater the in- 
centive for set owners to convert. In 
uhf-onl) markets there is no conver- 
sion problem, >>f course. The extent 
t" which vhf competition atlects the 
uhf circulation has been pinned down 
b) the American Research Bureau, 
which has made four studies of uhf set 
saturation in uhf and vhf-uhf market-. 

Here i- the average percent of all 
-el- a uhf station can reach after it 
has been on the air six months or 
more: 

Where there is no vhf station in the 

market: 89.89! . 

Where there i- one vhf station: 

65.4%. 






144 



SPONSOR 



BRA fi 




We've done a heap of living in our 6-year history . . . What 
with 60 live local shows every week in addition to the most 
popular programs of America's 4 networks. We're also pretty 
busy lending a helping hand to religious, educational and public 
service groups. Last year, for instance, a few outstanding accom- 
plishments included: 

6 NATIONAL NEWS SCOOPS 
FIRST FACSIMILE NEWS IN NEW ENGLAND 
FIRST COLOR TRANSMISSION IN NEW ENGLAND 
ZENITH PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD 

FIRST EDUCATIONAL TELECAST APPROVED BY THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 

There are more "firsts" and "bests" than this page could hold. In 
all, in the minds of men, we have gained PRESTIGE through 
serving . . . the best way we know how. 





RADIO And 

TELEVISION 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. represented nationally by Katz 

NEW ENGLAND'S FIRST COMPLETE BROADCASTING SERVICE-TV, AM, EM 

PRESENTLY SERVING 702,032 VHF SETS ON 100,000 WATTS (316,000 WATTS JULY, 1954) 



12 JULY 1954 



145 



\\ here there an two \ lil stations : 
10 l'«. 

\\ here there are three oi more » hi 
stations : 27. >' i , 



Q. What solutions have been 
suggested to help uhf stations? 
A. I In- hearings on the ulil question 
being held 1 • \ the Senate sub* ommit- 
tee "ii Interstate and Foreign Com- 
merce have been exposed to a wide 
variet) of solutions. One proposal 
would |nii all television in the uhf 
band so tin- problem ol vhl vs. ulil 
would In- ended on< e and foi all. I his 
has the suppoi t of FC( < lommissionei 
I rieda Hennock. There have been pro- 
posals that the FO stud) whether uhf- 
\hf intermixture can'1 In* done awav 
h nil. I In- idea is that all markets 
would be either uhf or \hl. One pro- 
posal, made bj Lou Poller, general 
manage] oi uhf station WCAN-TV, 
Milwaukee, and president of the I hi 
l\ \--n.. provides for the immediate 
end "I intermixture in 10 major mar- 
kets. He said these markets account 
for almost 509? OI the un f receivers 
in this country. 

Here are some other proposals: 



conditioned 

customer 

reflexes 



** 



******* 



liiii- id. bell .iii.l „, jk, 
ellent v a in. .mil water wlfJb ■ 
~- ■•>■— v.l lil>. I'.i. ill. I in. in,-, — 
i. .ill., Win.- or Llatertne. 

I Ii. % -lnrl.il Willi „iir ..ii.il, |, 
.mil il i,ui |il. in 

i .ill ,,r v. Ire lodai . 





• C O M P A N 



I 



dJwm 

ra-ili; 



■ing sal 



6000 Sunset Blvd 
Suite 203 

Hollywood 28. Calit 
Hollywood S-6I8I 

to imi-uV for 



• Dr. \lli ii B. Du Mont, presidenl 
"I Mien B. Du Mont Laboratories, 
which om n- the Du Mont I *J<\ ision 
Network, offered a plan whereb) each 
station would be required to relin- 
quish, il a network SO demanded, up 

i" 2 >' ■ of its network time in each ol 
the three time classifications. The as- 
sumption i- thai this time would be 
demanded of \ hf stations in a market 
h\ tin network or networks with uhf 
affiliates in that market. Du Mont be- 
lieves this plan would require no < Ion- 
gressional legislation but i ould be set 
up h\ the I ( < bj means ol the present 
station license system. 

• Mans ol those testif) ing before the 
subcommittee have urged that net- 
works be pel milled to own more than 
the maximum of five Stations now al- 
lowed. Some proposed that the addi- 
tional stations permitted should be uhf 
outlets only. Dr. Du Vlont proposed 
thai, under certain conditions. "A 
qualifying network will be permitted 
to have an additional whollv owned 
t\ station for each group of seven pri- 
mary uhf affiliations maintained." 

• One of the more wideK supported 
proposals is that the Federal e\< :ise tax 
be removed from all-ehannel i that is, 
uhf-vhf) t\ set-. 

• The use of boosters and satellite- 
to equalize uhf and vhf coverage is an- 
other proposal. Among those support- 
ing it is \BC. 



Q. Are any of these proposals 
likely to be adopted? 

A. ft is not believed likeK that an) 
radical action will he taken either h\ 
Congress or the FCC. Ending of uhf- 
vhf intermixture through re-allocation 
of channel- i- a complicated job. and 
it is not certain that a re-allocation 
would provide the same degree of I ,S. 
t\ coverage that the present set-up of- 
fers. NBC's Joseph V. HetTernan point- 
ed out that while NBC doe- not op- 
pose a stud) ol eliminating intermix- 
ture the \er\ fact that such a stud) 
Would be held Could slow down uhf 

conversions. \nd almost an\ kind of 
re-allocation would cause a "major 
wrench to the viewing public and 
broadcast operators, Heffernan said. 
Then- i- a possibilit) that the net- 
works will be permitted t<> own more 
-i. : ions il the) are uhi stations. This 
i- not considered a uhf cure-all but it 
will undoubted!) result in building up 
uhf in some markets. 



All signs point to the removal of the 
excise tax on all-wave t\ sets. With 
about 609? ol the t\ homes already 
equipped with vhf-onlj receivers, the 

inunediate effect would not In- great 

However, possibl) 1<> to L5 million 

non-U home- will become t\ homes 

during the next five to Mi years. Mid, 
assuming the life of a tv Bel to be 
about seven years, the all-important re- 
placement market will be growing rap- 
idl) during the remaining years of the 
50s. Since, with the removal of the 
excise lax on all-wave receivers the) 
will be ju-t about as cheap as vhf-onl) 
receivers, there is ever) reason to be- 
lieve that the i onsumer will bu) the all- 
wax c set when offered a choice. 
Removal ol the tax would reall) 

make itself felt when Coloi -els he- 
roine available in quantity. No uhf 
broadcaster would want to hold his 
breath that long but the likelihood of 
all-wave color sets bodes well for uhf s 
long-term future. It i- significant that 
the 5,000 15-inch ( olor sets KC \ has 
already produced are all equipped with 
all-wave tuners. 

Il is not clear whether anything will 
he done about boosters and satellites 
to equalize uhf and vhf coverage. \ 
certain amount of equalization is al- 
ready in effect theoretically. This has 
been accomplished b) permitting uhf 
more powerful transmitters. However, 
while there has been a consistent in- 
crease in the power of uhf transmitters 
being turned out. the technical prob- 
lems for the top power permitted have 
not all been solved. It cannot he said 
for certain whether a top power uhf 
signal will give comparable coverage 
to a top power vhf signal, and. there- 
fore, whether boosters and satellites 
will he needed. 



Color 

Q. How many color sets will an 
advertiser be able to reach via net- 
work tv this fall? 
A. Not many. Mid much less than 
expected sin months ago. While esti- 
mate- foi production ol color sets 
rani:.- from 50,000 to 200,000 b) the 
end of the year (see < hart page ll2i>». 
the likelihood is that the lowei figure 
i- closer to the truth. RCA's General 
Sarnofi used the 50,000 figure recent- 
ly. The talk about Ford buying 25,000 
coloi sets t" be installed in dealers' 



146 



SPONSOR 






IN UTAH 




KUTV Channel 2 

goes on the air September 7 
in Salt Lake City. It is 
Utah's most powerful sta- 
tion . . . with ABC program- 
ming and a mighty "plus" 
in showmanship for its Bil- 
lion Dollar Market. Now's 
the time to see your George 
P. Hollingbery representa- 
tive for full information on 
the best TVbuy in theWest, 

Buy the Big 2 in Utah 

KU0TV 




TELEVISION CENTRE - SALT LAKE CITY 




12 JULY 1954 



147 



showrooms would raise this Bgure. 
(tiir ol tin- reasons, though not the 
onl) one, that < oloi Bet production ma> 
not rea< h eai liei expectations is the 
realization that the I 1- or L5-inch color 
1 1 j ] >i - will not be acceptable to consum- 
ers used i" bigger screen sizes. The 
indusfa \ i- tut ning its attention i" 1 1 1< * 
biggei tubes. However, the industry 
has n< >t reall) gotten togethei <>n a Bin- 
gle type of color tube and that also 
has been slowing things up. 



Q. Who will have the first color 
sets? 

A. \ great deal of the production 
u ill go to appliance dealers For demon- 
stration purposes and to draw traffic. 
I ndoubtedl) man) in the i\ advei ris- 
ing field will bu) color Bets for profes- 
sional reasons. As pointed out al>ove, 
a comparativel) large numbei ma) end 
up in lord dealers' showrooms. 'Ihe 
expectation that, as in the early black- 
and-white tv days, many consumers 
will l>c introduced to color via the 
barroom set. has already gotten the 
juke box people worried. Juke box 
lm-iness fell off heavih in the earl) 




days of b&v t\. and the record people 
are making plans now for offsetting 
theii new nemesis. 



Q. How many markets will an 
advertiser be able to reach in color 
via network tv this fall? 
A. I he broadcasting industry's abil- 
it\ to Bend out color programs is far 
in advance ol the consumer's al>ilit\ 
to receive them. \ sponsor surve) of 
all television stations indicated that 
about 709? of them will have **• j ii i j »- 
incut to rebroadcast network coloi 
-how- b) the end of the j eai . 

Answers were received from about 
one-third of all the stations, represent- 
ing a good cross-section. I For infor- 
mation on local color plans by station-. 
see the Spot tv section. 1 Here is the 
breakdown from 134 respondent-: 

• Stations equipped to rebroadcast 
color before 15 July: 44 or 32.8', . 

• Stations which will be equipped b) 
the end of the year: 52 or 38.!!', . 
1 Main of these will be set up for net- 
work color before the end of this 
month. I 

• Stations which will be equipped 
during 1955: 7 or .5.2' , . 

• Stations which will lie equipped 
during L956: 2 or 1.5%. 

• Stations with no plans or no net- 
work affiliation: 29 or 21.7', . 

No station other than the one origi- 
nating the program can send out color 
unless it receives the network signal 
first b) wa\ of AT&T micro-wave or 
coaxial (able facilities. The AT&T re- 
ports that, as of 24 June, its color 
television facilities were available to 
50 stations in 36 cities. Here are the 
cities, alphabetically: 

Baltimore. Boston. Chicago, Cincin- 
nati. Cleveland, Columbus. Dallas, 
Dayton, Denver, Detroit. Fort Worth. 
Houston. Huntington, W. Ya.: Johns- 
town, Pa.; Kansas City, Mo.: Lancas- 
ter, Pa.; Los Angeles, Milwaukee. Min- 
neapolis, New York, Oklahoma City, 
Omaha. Philadelphia, Providence, St. 
Louis. St. Paul, Salt Lake City, San 
Francisco. Schenectady, Syracuse, To- 
ledo. Tulsa, I ti< a. Washington, Wil- 
mington, Del., and 1 oungstown. 

It i> expected thai b) the end of the 
year \ I \ I color facilities will be avail- 
able to 1 30 station- in 95 cities. 

The important figures to network tv 
advertisers are how mam stations b) 
networks will be able to -end out color 
programs. In Ma\ Hugh Beville, 



NBC's directoi ol research and plan- 
ning, estimated on the ba-i- of orders 
from NBC l\ affiliates for network 
color equipment, that network color 
Bervice would be available to 9595 of 

all t\ home-. |.a-t month the network 

gave out up-to-date figures Bhowing 
it- color coverage onl) where \T\ I 
facilities were alread) provided. 

The figure as of 17 June was 31 
stations aide to receive and rebroad- 
cast color programs. Total by the 
year's end i- expected to be <>1 sta- 
tions. I In- MBC I \ lineup will make 
colorcasts available to 78', of all tv 
home-. 1,1 25,800,000 estimated Bete 
b) the end <>l the year. 

CB> reports that about 60 to 70 of 
its affiliates will be aide to rebroadcast 
network color. UJC and Dm Mont have 
no plans for network color -hows this 
fall so tin- question ol a network color 
lineup is academic . Man) of theii sta- 
tions, however, both owned-and-oper- 
ated and affiliates, will have equipment 
for rebroadcastine color. 



Q. Why should an advertiser buy 
a color program this fall when 
there are so few sets around? 
A. NBC's Pat Weaver summed up 
most of the reasons during his address 
before the 1 \ - in Vpril. He said: 

"First, the color television campaign 
will determine the share of market of 
most consumer goods in color tele\i- 
sion homes and tin- will start within 
this coining year, and to those com- 
panies which need effective advertising 
to survive tall package goods, trade- 
mark, brand items), the time to start 
color television is this fall, and the 
place to get the money is from man- 
agement as extra mone) to insure that 
the compan) learns how to use the 
most \ital new force in it> history and 
at once. 

"Second, if you have any clients 
whose success is largel) dependent on 
the elan and spirit of it- selling, deal- 
er and distributor organization, then 
color television can make new leaders 
before the \car is out. For even the 
few thousand sets now coming into the 
market are still enough to permit deal- 
er color television demonstration meet- 
ing-, and prospect color television par- 
tie-, and other obvious demonstrations. 

This kind of Color power to -ell uoods 
NOW i- part of the broader power of 
< olor a- the new thing, the new. talked- 
about, exciting, all-interest-focusing 



148 



SPONSOR 




ARKANSAS . . . 

The fastest growing state 
in the fastest growing 
Region in the 
United States of America 



From 1940 to 7950 — ARKANSAS increased: 

ARKANS AS U.S. A VERAGE 

Bank deposits 281 % 1 31 % 

Per Capita Income 255% 150% 

Retail Sales 302% 207% 

Little Rock per family effective buying income exceeds — Houston, Dallas, Ft. Worth, St. 
Louis, Kansas City, New Orleans, Shreveport, Oklahoma City and the national average! 

To tap this Rich Market, use KAKK Little Rock* 

No. 1 _ - 7 AM-12 Noon M-F 

No. 1 - 12 Noon-6 PM M-F 

No. 1 6-1 1 PM Sun. -Sat. 

KAKK first 66 quarter hours out of 72* 

All 10 Top Evening shows KARK 

All 10 Top Daytime Shows: M-F _ KARK 

All 9 out of 10 Top Daytime Programs: Sat. — Sun. KARK 

"according to Pulse March, 1954 

"r 

Represented by / V/ . 

!!••■ 

•• 

Little Rock, Arkansas 



Edward Petry 
& Co., Inc. 




< unversation piece of the \mei u an 
-. ene. 

■• I here are man) companies who 
\ N ill need i oloi be< ause the) are ex- 
po ted i" lead and 1 1 1 « - x musl lead ; and, 

therefore, the) musl I"' in i "I i 

-nil, i grave I"-- "I standing w ithin 
theii own trade groups. I here are 
man) n ore < ompanies w ho w ill see in 
. oloi a wa) to excite their own ovei - 
all organizations, i" give them a chan< e 
,,i leadei ship w hi< li maj ha> e slipped 
"Hi oi 1 1 1 • - 1 1 hands. 



Q. How much color programing 
will there be on the networks this 
coming season? 

A. Quite a bit "I it. I In- most sen- 
sal ional developmenl in color |»i ogram- 
ing i- the three once-a-month NBC 
spe ia. nl. ii s. I h ". pi oduced b) Max 
Liehman, \\ ill In- on >\ ei \ Fourth Sun- 
day, 7 :30-9 :l K) p.m., ami e^ ei \ fourth 
Saturday, 9:00-10:30 p.m. One, pro- 
duced b) I .eland I la) ward, w ill be on 
ever) fourth Monday, 9:00-10:30 p.m. 
Oldsmobile has boughl oul the Sat- 
iii da) coloi sp& i Lculai . Ford ami 
Hi \ w ill i osponsoi the Monda) spe - 




F-TV 



CBS FOR THE QUAD-CITIES 

is now operating 
on 100,000 wafts 

• 
This maximum power 
covers the Quad-Cities 
and the surrounding trade 
area ... a total of 264, 
800 TV set owners. 

Les Johnson, V.P. and Gen. Mgr. 




WHBF 

TEIC0 BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Aver y - Knodel, Inc. 



tacular, taking 15 minutes <>l each 
show . I he Sunda) i oloi Bhow w ill be 
— I > 1 it three ways. Reynolds Metals 
boughl three entire shows while Sun- 
beam and Hazel Bishop will split the 
remaindei , 

In addition, the NBC daytime par- 
ticipations shows, Today and Home 
h ill Feature i oloi pickups. NBC is try- 
ing i" gel oth( i clients to pul theii 
b&w shows on in coloi on a regulai oi 
pei iodic basis. The netwoi k can pro 
gram about 12 to I •"> hours a week "I 
i oloi show - w iili its existing Btudios, 
ii- mobile color equipment and its 
iklyn <<>l>ir studio, which will be 

read) in Septembei . NBl *s Hollyw I 

studio w ill be read) foi coloi b) aboul 
I Januar) 1955, adding even more 
time to the L2-15 hours. 

t'n i IBS, \\ estinghouse w ill pul on 
eight to 10 color shows nexl season in 
the L0:00-1 I :00 p.m. Wednesda) slol 
normall) occupied b) Pabst's Blue 
Ribbon Bouts and the Follow-up sports 
-how. Sports Spot. The Westinghous< 
show is titled, The Best of Broadu a\ . 
( .lu\ sler ma) pul on periodic < oloi 
shows in its 8:30-9:30 I hursda) nighl 
segment, in which the auto firm will 
showcase three dramas and one musi- 
cal c\ <t\ month. 

(.US will Inllou iii [lie footsteps of 
NBC this season and give each client 
coloi exposure without extra cost. The 
free color ride lineup will starl 22 Au- 
gust with Toast of the Town and end 
27 Februar) with Sunday News Spe- 
cial. The plan will provide for three 
color shows a week. In the spring 
CBS will accelerate color programing 
through some as-yet-unannounced 
plans. 

CBS will have three studios for color 
b) the Fall. In addition to it* existing 
coloi studio at its 185 Madison Ave.. 
New ^ oik. headquarters, CBS recentl) 
acquired the Itlst Street Theatre and 
i> remodeling it at a cost of $1.5 mil- 
lion, [ts Television City studios in 
Hollywood are also being set up Foi 
color. 



Q. How much more expensive is 
color than black-and-white? 
A. Since NBC and CBS began ex- 
perimenting with color. the\ have 
learned how to i ul down mi the hordes 
ol to hni( ians, makeup people, etc., 
which wcic required at first. However, 
< oloi will always be somewhat more 
expensive than black-and-white, Esti- 



male- ol wliat coloi will add to the t\ 

bill range from 10 to 2<>'r over-all 
i time, talent and production i . 

Color equipment and Btudios will be 
more expensive. Foi example: NBl - 
non-audience Btudios foi b&w shows in 
New York ami Chicago (excluding 
Studio oil i are $150 gross an hour. 

Vudience Facilit) Btudios are $300 an 
hour. Comparable charges foi color 
studios run From $250 to $550. \ 
b&w mobile unit i- $800 gross a <la\. 

\ color mobile unit is $3,200 a day. 
< !abl( chai g< - foi i oloi are higher. 

\ I VI i- temporal il\ charging S 1 ,200 
a half houi . i- seeking $2,000 Foi • olor. 



Q. What effect is color having 

on media planning? 

A. sponsor asked that question of 

media and radio-h exei utives in the 

top aii agen< ies. Here are some an- 

swers: 

Fred Barrett, vice president in 
charge of media, BBDO: •■While we 
realize the enormous possibilities and 
effectiveness of color i\ and anti ipate 
it- use foi man) of our i lients, it- ef- 
l<'ct on in. dia planning w ill not be ver) 
marked until the number of coloi sets 
create- a sizable market and make- . ol- 
oi production effi< i< nl from a i •■-! 
standpoint." 

// illiam C. Dekker, vice president in 
charge <>i media. WcCann-Erickson: 
"Because audience and cost detail- of 
color television are -till nebulous, the 
advent ol color has played little role 
in basic media planning. With few 
notable exceptions, most consideration 
of color has been either from the ex- 
perimental or promotional angle. I 
believe these will continue to be i lu- 
major area- until such time a- we can 
realK -tart to count noses and costs 
which time, if we can take a leaf from 
the black-and-white notebook, will 
probabl) come a lot fastei than even 
the nio-i optimistic ol us i ontemplate." 

Arthur Porter, vice president in 
charge of media. Leo Burnett: "The 
approach of color t\ i- having a pr<>- 
Found effect on both creative and me- 
dia planning in our agency. While ob- 
viousl) a great part of our analysis 
and stud) must he based on hypothet- 
ical conditions and costs, we are tr\- 
ing to assess the place of color l\ in 
our clients' programs as objective!) as 

we < an. 

li alter (>. Smith, vice president and 

media dint lot. Biou : "Although color 



150 



SPONSOR 



JN^rt? 4 











> 



audiences 



turn 





. . . . more than to any other Detroit station! 



After 6 P.M. during May, reports ARB, there were 
71 quarter-hours when more than 50% of Detroit's 
television sets were in use. 

In 45* or 63% of these 71 big-audience periods, WWJ-TV 
had the largest audience of Detroit's three television 
stations. 

In the 9 months from September, 1953, through May, 
1954, WWJ-TV drew the most viewers in 55.2% of the 
total big-audience periods. 



*3-station comparison of audience 
leadership in 71 quarter-hours 



WWJ-TV Station B Station C Station B 

(46 ( 2 2) (4) plus C 

periods) (26) 



WWJ-TV's record means that when 
Detroiters are most receptive to tele- 
vision, WWJ-TV dominates more 
of their time than do both other 
Detroit stations combined. 

Month after month, this dominance 
continues. 



In Detroit . . . 
You Sell More 
on channel 




maw 

NBC Television Network 

DETROIT 

Associate AM-FM Station WW) 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN • Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 
• National Representatives: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



12 JULY 1954 



151 



t >1«\ ision has ool as yel bad anj im- 
I m .1 lain i-Hi i i mi i 111 kiiI media plans, 
ii is being given careful Btud) l>\ all 
concerned with program and commer- 
, ial production, .1- well as media plan- 
ning. I Ixpei iiiiciii.il work i- being 1 ai • 
1 ied t"i ward cm the program and com- 
ial end, and proje* ted cost and 
. overage anal} sis are being can ied 
forward From the media end. Sin< e 
man] concerned with the industry pre- 
dict thai the advenl <>l color w ill not 
substantial!) increase television pro- 
duction and time costs, there is the 
possibilit) thai other media may not 
be t"" seriousl) affe led ex< epJ i" 
1 1 1 « - extent thai advertisers invesl more 
(■I their t < » t . 1 1 appropi iation in the me- 
dium "I television itself. This lattei 
possibilil\ seems < ] 1 1 i 1 1 ■ likelj in \ iew 
of television's increasing stature a- a 
national medium." 



Time franchise 

Q. Does the network tv advertis- 
er have any rights to a time fran- 
chise? 

A. It seems to be generally agreed 
thai the advertise] has no legal right 
to a time franchise beyond the span 
<d lii — Facilities contract. Facilities con- 
tracts generally run IY>r a >car but, in 
an) case, wouldn't run for longer than 
two years since FCC regulations for- 
bid the networks to sign affiliation con- 
tracts for longer than that period. 
Furthermore, 13-week mutual cancel- 
lation contracts have been growing 
more common on tv. 



Q. Why, then, does the adver- 
tiser talk about his franchise 
rights? 

A. The advertiser takes the point of 



view thai ii he and bis agenc) invesl 

time and mo nc \ to build up a show 

and promote ii to the listener he should 
lia\c- some mora] right to his time pe- 
riod, lew advertisers will complain 
il tin- network boot- out of the lineup 
a poorl) rated program, but as one 
agenc) executive told sponsor Last 
Bpring (see "'What arc your 'rights' 
to a time slot?" 5 \pril L954) : "To 
lake awa\ a lime period i- a Serious 

blow to an advertiser. I he w hole 
meaning of the franchise concept i- 
terriblj important to advertisers and 

agencies who buj lime on radio and 

i\." The importance, obviously, i- 
greater in television where the crowd- 
ed nighttime program lineup make- a 
lime period extremelj valuable. 



Q. What is the network attitude 
toward the sponsor's time fran- 
chise ideas? 

A. All things being equal, all the net- 
works like to keep customers happj 
and let them bu\ whatever time they 
are willing to pa\ for. However, the 
networks will not admit that clients 
even have a moral righl to a time fran- 
chise. To admit tlii-—. the) feel, is the 
same as saying advertisers have a legal 
right. And the networks point out that 
the responsibilities of their o&o's and 
affiliates as publicly licensed broad- 
caster- require them to control the pro- 
graming that is broadcast over the 
publicly owned broadcast spectrum. 

In actual practice, network poli< \ 
differs, and it will not surprise anyone 
to hear that there is some relationship, 
though it is not always a simple one, 
between the networks' time franchise 
policy and the amount of business it 
has. Du Mont publicly advertises the 
fact that its clients' periods are safe. 
One ad says: "Decide on the Network 
that Protects Your Time. There's no 




^r_ 



Business is Good 
in ABILENE 

Thanks to 

KRBC-TV 




costlier television experience than to 
lose your investment in a program 01 
time ... 01 both ... at your con- 
tract's expiration. Hiis doesn't happen 
t<> Du Mont sponsors ... it won't hap- 
pen to you." 

On the opposite Bide is NBC, where 
President Pal Weaver has made it 
clear that decisions on time and pr<>- 
graming must be- made by the net- 
work. In a recent restatement of that 

poliC) before the 1 \ '- \\eu\er -aid. in 

describing plans for the once-a-month 
color spectaculars: 

"'I elc\ i-ion i- too great and too pow- 
erful to be shackled with chains of 
custom and usage from radio. \\ e 
musl Berve all segments and all inter- 
ests in OUT population, and there must 
be an over-all program control that 
make- the rule- in the interest of pub- 
lic service and all segment population 
service. This is the business of the net- 
works. II our service dwindle-. \<>u 
will use less « » f it. or pa\ less for it. 
That's the end ol your responsibility. 
If we eater to the hea\ \ viewers with 
a Hood of trivia, a- accused in some 
(juarters. we cannot look to you, or to 
the advertisers large or -mall, lor your 
job- are rightl) defined b\ your in- 
terest — the sale of goods and services 
ot youi c lii-iil-. ' 



Tv unions 



Represented nationally by 
JOHN E. PEARSON TV Inc. 



ABILENE 
TEXAS 



Q. How much have unions con- 
tributed to the network tv pro- 
duction cost increases during the 
past year? 

A. An average of 7 to T 1 ^'' wage 
increases were obtained b\ the unions 
that negotiated for new contracts dur- 
ing the fall 1953 through spring 1"">1 
period. This is considered a relatively 
modest increase compared with wage 
boosts obtained over the past four or 
five year-. 

Network labor negotiators attribute 
the more moderate contracts of this 
year to the following factors: 

• The base pay in tv is alread\ 
verj high compared with wages for 
comparable jobs in other types of 
industry. 

• The genera] softening of the de- 
mand for labor in the I . S. economy 
a- a whole during the pasl 12 months 
had to make it-elf felt in tv to some 

extent 

• On a "demand what the freight 



152 



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tv j . it -r% iuccesslul • 

ith BetterHomes *»<* Farmin 



and Gardens 



12 JULY 1954 



153 



can bear" basis, union leaders have 
be* i. in.- aware "I the dangei thai tv 
might reach a point ol diminishing 
returns i"i ~|><pii-<>i - il production 
. "-i- kept rising at theii pre- L953 rate. 



Q. What arc the provisions of the 

most recently negotiated union 

contracts? 

A. Urn'- a summarj oi the latest 

union contracts: 

RTDG [Radio and li Directors 
Guild I : I lii- < ontract, reti oa< live to 
I \|u il L95 I. was i "ir luded in mid- 
June between RTDG and the five net- 
works. Generally, the contract repre- 
sents a 7 1 -', increase, but here's bow 
il breaks dow a : 

1 . Directors recen e $180 instead <>f 
8175 a week (that is '2.1\' < more). 

2. Assistant directors in i\ gel 
$132.50 in-tca<l of $120 a week (or 
li'.i', re). 

3. Local directors in radio receive 
$100 instead of $90 a week (or 11', 
more) . 

I hi- contract affects directors, a d's, 
floor managers at ABC, CBS and NBC. 
directors and a/d's only at Du Mont 
and radio directors al MBS. 

IBLlt i International Brotherhood 
d! Electrical Workers): The new con- 
tract went into effect I Max IT>| be- 
tween CBS and 1BI.W for technicians. 
It represents an .'!'* increase in sala- 
ries for technicians but no significant 
change in working conditions. 

\FM {American Federation of Mu- 
sicians): On 1 February 1954 the 
MM signed a five-year contract with 
the networks. This contract provides 
l"i a L095 increase in salaries of staff 
musicians for three years and an ad- 
ditional [0% increase during the sub- 
sequent two years. 

Since ihis contract applies only to 
>tatT employees, it is estimated that 
the over-all cost of music at the net- 
work- will be affected l>\ le-s than a 
.V , boost. 

\en } or/, Wahe-l j> irtists {Local 
798), Vea ) orL Wardrobe Mistresses 
[Local 7<>1>. Graphic Irtists 1 Local 
841) of I iTSE 1 International Alliance 
of Theatrical Stage Employees) : These 
contracts were negotiated in spring 
1954 between the three locals and 
\BC. CBS and NBC. Totally the) 
represent an increase of 7' , or less. 

Radio Grips [Local 782) of IATSE: 
I In- 1 ontract pro\ ided f < »r a 7 1 •_>' < 



increase in wages and affected \B(. 

and \l!< . 

< ontrai 1- thai are going I" be up 
I'M renegotiation within the near fu- 
ture include the follow ing : 

////»' 1 1 Imerican Federation <>i 
I elei ision am/ Radio irtists) : 1~> 
Novembei 1954 with all the networks. 

Stagehands I I. oral L) ,,\ IATSI 
31 De eml ei L954 wi'h all netwoi ' 5. 

Du Mont is ' urrentl) -till negotiat- 
ing h iih I VI SE for it- ti-' lini' ians. It 
i- the <miI\ network whose cameramen 
and technicians are n e - bei - "I I \. In 
New York the network negotiate- with 
Local 794 Foi it- technicians 9 contract, 
however, the contrail- with the locals 
in Pittsburgh and Washington are -till 
under negotiation. 

Du Mont- entile organizational set- 
up is different from that of \l!( '. and 
NBC, where technician- are members 
of NABET 'National Association of 
Broadcast Employees and Technicians I 
and CBS where they are members of 
IBf.W 1 International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers I . 

\l Du Mont technicians break down 
into four categories: 

A. Transmitter technicians, equip- 
ment maintenance men. transmission 
technicians. 

B. Camera operators, projectionists, 
audio technicians, \ideo technician-. 
sound effects men. 

C. Microphone boom men and util- 
il\ men. 

I). Studio assistant (cable puller). 

At the other three t\ networks floor 
managers are member- of RTDG and 
act the same wage rale as a/d's. \t 
Du Mont, however, floor managers are 
covered by IATSE and come from B 
category of technician-. 

A contract with T\\ \ (Television 
\\ riters of America 1 has been under 
negotiation with ABC. CBS and NIK 
since early fall 1953. This contract 
will cover freelance l\ writer- when it 
goes into effect. 

.Negotiations are also current!) go- 
ing on between four networks and 
RWG (Radio Writers Guild) both for 
stall new- writers and staif continuity 
writer-. The RWG • ontract for free- 
lance radio writers, which expired 15 
May, has been extended until 15 

September. 

N \l!l I' contracts will not be up foi 
renegotiation until next January. How- 
ever, \\\(. expects to have negotiations 
with IATSE in Dei ember for stage- 
hands 1 contracts. 



Q. Are the affiliated stations 
bound by the contracts negotiated 
by the network labor relations 
people? 

A. No. Network laboi relations de- 
partments handle all the negotiations 
I'M the o&o stations only. I nion con- 
tracts between the affiliates and their 
local union- are entirel) independent*; 
negotiated and signed b) the manage- 
ment ol the affiliated station. In fact, 
frequently technicians at an affiliate 
do not belong to the -ame union as 
technicians at the network. 



Q. How is the cost trend in tv 
production likely to be affected 
by the union negotiations forth- 
coming during the next year? 
A. Iv costs seem to be leveling off. 
I.al.oi negotiators al foui tv network- 
agree that the demands during the past 
year have been the nn.—t modest in 
tv history. It is unlikel) that the) will 
spiral within the near future as the) 
had during tv's infancy. 



ROUND-UP 

[Continued from page 61 I 
Brit'ily . . . 



WBZ-WBZA, Boston, i- sending 
timebuyers a 12-inch metal ruler in- 
scribed with it- call letters. Accom- 
panying the ruler is the following let- 
ter: "There's no set rule — 12 in he- 
make a foot, and 'a pint's a pound the 
world around. From all indications, 
and letters ol commendation from cli- 
ent-. WBZ-WBZA is iiixinj; a good 
measure of success to it- ( lients. . . ." 

* • • 

\fter just 18 week- on the air 
WNEM-TV, Baj City, Mich., was 
awarded first place in the nationwide 
NBC-Crosle) Hit Parade promotion 
contest, according to John H. Bone, 
genera] manager. 1 he award was 
made 1>\ BBDO in conjunction with 
NBC and the \vco Mfg. Corp. for the 
most outstanding promotion and mer- 
chandising of all NBC TV stations. 

* * « 

K. 1 \\ . Philadelphia, is distributing 

a new booklet on summer radio listen- 
ing, titled "Even on vacation, families 

in K'l \\ land never leave home." The 
booklet points out that, according to 
Vdvertest, ')1.1'< of families are at 



154 



SPONSOR 



KOLN-TV 



towers 1000 FEET above 



LINCOLN-LAND 

NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET! 



The map below shows Lincoln-Land — 34 double-cream 
counties of Central and Southeastern Nebraska — 
577,600 people with a buying income of #761,124,000 
(#473,681,000 of which came from farming in 1952, 
— over one-third of Nebraska's total farm income! ). 
Actually, the KOLN-TV tower is 75 miles from 



Omaha; Lincoln is 58 miles. With our 1000-foot 
tower and 316,000 watts on Channel 10, effective June 
1st, KOLN-TV will reach over 100,000 families who 
arc unduplicated by any other station. 
Ask Avery-Knodel all about KOLN-TV, in America's 
EIGHTH farm state! 



CHANNEL 10 
316,000 WATTS 



WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 




• DUMONT 



Avery-Knodel, Inc. 
Exclusive National Representatives 




12 JULY 1954 



155 



home in the Philadelphia area on an) 
Bummei da) . < >l the less than 1 1 ' 
who are on vacation al an) one time, 
54.6 ^i visited vacation -|n >i- in Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey, within 
K^ \\ "> ( -overage area, sayg the station. 
* * • 

\\ innei (.1 K Ml \ . < rmaha's all-ex- 
pense trip for two to Sun Vallej was 
\li— Ruth Mensch, i > t ( lomer and Pol- 
lard agency, Kansas City. The trip was 



^^1 


9 




I- 


f ■ I 


V 



awarded on the basis of a slogan con- 
test conducted last March by the tv 
station. \liove, Miss Mensch (left) 
and Mi — Darlene Dewald enjoy a bi- 
cycle ride at Sun Valley. 

* * * 

The first annual "Kitty Award," 
presented b) Manchester Hosiery Mills 
to the year- outstanding new star was 
given recentl) to May Wynn for her 
performance in the movie Ccdne Mu- 
tiny. The award was presented over 
I)u Mont's Broadway to Hollywood 
show by Claire Mann. WABD person- 
ality 

* * * 

\\( r>l\. Memphis, sent out a press 
release in the form of a news clipping 
from the Memphis Press-Scimitar re- 
i entry to announce that it will stress 
Negro programing in the future. It 
becomes Memphis' second radio sta- 
tion directed primaril) at a Negro au- 
dience. The station has been convert- 
ed to operate under an entireh Negro 
program -taff as a music-and-news 
outlet, according to W. M. H. (Bill! 
Smith, genera] manager of tlie Chick- 
asaw Broadcasting < o. 

* * * 

Some 60,000 card-carr\ ing members 
ii| the " estern Ledger Club were in- 
vited t<> the first annual // estern Led- 
ger Round-up b) \\ [TV, Bloomington, 
recently. " estern Ledge) is an after- 
noon kid-' show, on W I I \ [or the 
past i"in years. Some 35,000 people 



in !!. 000 cars Bhowed up at the out- 
door event held .it McCormick'a State 
Park. Sole charge was the regular 
Indiana 12c park admission fee and 
luc per car parking fee. 

• * « 

KEYD-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
signed it- first sponsor the same day 
the I ( !C granted its C.P. The sponsor: 
Russell I.. Stotesbery, president of the 
Marquette National Bank of Minne- 
apolis. Representing klA I )-'l \ at the 
contract signing was Lee Whiting. v.p. 
and general manager of KETi I) and 
KEYD-TV. The station is expected to 
begin operating next Januai j . 

* ■» -.> 

This fall for the fifth consecutive 
year \\ M< \. New York, will broad- 
casl Notre Dame football game-. The 
1954 schedule includes 11 games from 
25 September to 4 December. All 
games will be sponsored b) the New 
York Ford Dealers Assn. 
■ * * 

Philip Morris has launched a new 
merchandising campaign to tie in with 
its / Love Lucy CBS TV show. It has 
prepared a 40-page recipe and how-to- 
do-it booklet and is offering the book- 
let on it- t\ -how. \\ indow posters and 

Send&r 

'•(Ov _ s 

""Hi<' 




HOUSEHOLD HINTS 



PARTY TIPS 



GET YOUR 

ORDER BLANK HERE 



v 



KING SIZE Of REOUIAR 



point-of-sale material will also feature 
the booklet. Other tie-ins include 
i ounter-easels which hold the coupons 
necessar) for customers to gel copies. 

The booklet is now being distributed 
in 12 test market-. 

* * * 

\\K\I>- new felevision-Radio ('en- 
ter in West Hartford, Conn., was offi- 
cially opened recently by Governor 
John Lodge. More than 200 govern- 
ment, business and civic organization 



leaders as well as representatives of 
major tv and radio networks attended 
the ceremonies. The center comprises 
Jii.OOO square feet of operating space. 

* • • 

\\ BT, Charlotte, has prepared a new 
sales instrument in the -hape of a slide 
rule. Called the "1954 Pulse of Char- 




lotte.'" the -lide nil • i see abo\ e i - how - 
the quarter-hour ratings and share-of 
audience for each Charlotte radio sta- 
tion on a seven-day average. Included 
is a chart to convert V. BT ratings into 
listening homes within the basic cover- 
age area. 

* • • 

Half the super markets in the coun- 
try and 60% of the top 1.000 food 
product manufacturers are now using 
radio regularly, according to R. David 
Kimble, director of local promotion 
for the BAB. Kimble pointed out that 
radio is the only medium through 
which it is economically feasible to 
provide the "constant repetition of 
sales messages necessar) to sell food 
products in this era of multiple brands. 
self-service shopping and robot retail- 

91 

ing. 

* • • 

\ detailed market study citing the 
growth and changes in the Middle 
Georgia market and coverage of this 
47-COUnty area b\ \\ M \Z- 1 \ is now 
being distributed to advertisers and 
agencies 1>\ Vvery-KnodeL Titled 
'" \bout the Middle Georgia Market — 
and How the Media Picture Has 
Changed," the report points out that 
Macon, center of this trading area and 
point of origin of the uhf station's 
programing, i- farther from am other 
large <it\ than New York is from Phil- 
adelphia. W M \/- 1 \ - -hare of audi- 
ence i- IV, sign-on to noon. < 
during the afternoon and 57' '< at 
night, according to the -tud\ . 



156 



SPONSOR 



tt 



TOPEKA 
IS AMERICA'S TOP 
SLEEPER MARKET 

Here's a market that's just waiting to be exploited. Topeka ranks 14th 
in the nation in Consumer Spendable Income* with $6,804 per house- 
hold. That's 29.7% above the national average! 



** 



Consumer Markets — 1954 



DOMINATED BY WIBW-TV 




Topeka has only one television station — WIBW-TV. We blanket 
America's No. 14 market and give you a good solid "plus" out- 
side. By the time you read this, our new 1000 foot tower and full 
87.1 KW power should be delivering over 100,000 homes . . . 
without counting a single home in either Kansas City or St. Joseph. 



CBS-DU MONT-ABC 

Interconnected 



The Kansas View Point 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 

WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 

KCKN in Kansas City 



12 JULY 1954 



157 





YOU MIGHT CLEAR 15 7%"*- 



IH I . . . 



GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO HOOPERS 

January, 1954 

Share-Of -Television -Audience 





MON.-FRI. 
7 a.m.- 
12 noon 


MON.-FRI. 

12 noon- 

5 p.m. 


SUN. -SAT. 

6 p.m.- 
12 midnight 


WKZO-TV 


80%f 


85% 


62% 


B 


31 %f 


15% 


38% 



^Adjusted to compensate for the fact that neither station 
was on the air all hours. 

NOTE: Sampling was distributed approximately 75% in 
Grand Rapids area, 25% in Kalamazoo area. 



V 

'/ 

WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDSKALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF.FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN. TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Auociated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 




YOU NEED WKZO-TV 

TO GO OVER IN I 

WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

WKZO-TV, Channel 3, is the Official Basic CBS Television 
Outlet for Kalamazoo-Crand Rapids — serves more than 
406,922 television homes in 29 Western Michigan and 
Northern Indiana counties. This is a far larger television 
market than \ ou ? U find in and around many cities two and 
three times as big! 

January ? 54 Hoopers, left, credit WKZO-TV with 63.2', 
more evening viewers than the next \\ estern Michigan sta- 
tion — 158.1% more morning viewers-— 466.695 more after- 
noon viewers! 

(100,000 WATTS— CHANNEL 3) 

WKZ0TV 

OFFICIAL BASIC CBS FOR WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery- Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



'( (initials II armerdam ni the San Francisco Olympic Club set this world's record on Way 23, 1942, 



158 



SPONSOR 




1954: u. s. tv in nearly two out of three homes 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the 9 pages of this report 

(| a How many tv homes are there today (and what % is this of U.S.)? /*"?/*' i 

|| a How many multiple-set tv homes are there? page - 

i|. II hat are socio-economic differences between radio and tv homes? page 3 

l|. How does tv viewing vary tvith the time of day? page 4 

|| a Is tv affected by seasonal variations in vieiving? page 5 

l|. U hat's the audience composition of tv at varying times? page •"» 

l|. What's the cost-per-1,000 of network tv show types? page 7 

|Ji What are some typical talent-production costs for network tv shows? page 8 

12 JULY 1954 159 




iwnensians o/ TVs audience 



1. How many tv homes are there today (and what percent is this of the U.S.)? 

SOURCE: NBC TV Research, I May 1948 and I May 1954 

ft.'{% of the nation's honn's <*«ii be reached hu television 




338,000 



30,000,000 63% 



1948 




1954 



For every one tv set in the U.S. in 1948 — just six years ago this 
summer — there are 1,000 sets today. According to industry estimates 
tv has accounted for more sales in the past four years than any 
other basic appliance. Television has changed the pattern of Ameri- 
can home life (more home entertainment; fewer outings to movies, 
clubs) and has created a whole galaxy of star names, from Jackie 



Gleason to Jack Webb. Figures above reflect tv growth in new 
areas; some 8,000,000 homes in these areas were added to the 
national video audience in the past year. Tv growth, now reaching 
near-saturation in some areas (in cities with more than 500,000 
homes some 85 f r have tv) is siowing, but is expected to spurt 
again as colo- tv receivers (see chart page 120) are purchased. 



2. How is tv distributed in the U.S. by key geographical areas? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co.. April 1954 



All radio 

homes (000), 

including 

those 

having tv^ 

" of radio 

homes 

having tv 

sets 



NORTHEAST 

12,345 



EAST CENTRAL 



8,014 



WEST CENTRAL 

9,145 



SOUTH 

11,110 



PACIFIC 

6,032 



82.1 % 



67.9% 



57.9% 



62.2% 



43.8% 




10,139 



5,445 



5,294 



4,865 



3,752 



TV BASICS 



pagi l 



3. How are television homes distributed according to city size? 



SOURCE: NBC TV study "Television's Daytime Profile" 



HOMES IN CITIES WITH POPULATION OF 


TOTAL 
HOMES 


TV 
HOMES 


NON-TV 
HOMES 


1,000,000 and over 


13.4% 


18.1% 


7.2% 


250,000-999,999 


12.3% 


15.7% 


7.5% 






50,000-249,999 


11.8% 


13.0% 


10.1% 






2,500-49,999 


24.4% 


22.7% 


26.6% 






Under 2,500 


38.1% 


30.5% 


48.6% 







Distribution of tv heavier 
in major metropolises 

The chart at left compares the proportion of 
U.S. homes located in cities of varying pop- 
ulation with the location of television sets. 
There is a higher concentration of television 
homes in the larger cities. While 1 3 r r of 
the population is found in cities of 1,000,000 
population and more, 18.1% of all tv homes 
are found in cities of this size. In the small- 
est U.S. communities, cities of under 2,500, 
38.19c of the U.S. population resides. There, 
however, are found only 30.5% of all U.S. 
television homes. 



All homes 100,0% 100,0% 100.0% 



4. What percent of television homes are able to receive more than one station? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., January I954 



85% of U.S. tv homes receive 
more than one television station 

The chart at right was compiled by A. C. Nielsen Co. 
for January 1954. Since more stations have come on the 
air in the intervening months, the pattern has shifted even 
more sharply toward a situation in which viewers have a 
choice of television programs. While no single market 
has more than seven channels specifically assigned to it, 
2% of the population is shown here receiving nine to II 
stations. This is accounted for by sets located between 
major centers which are able to receive signals from sev* 
eral markets. The majority of sets, however, are those 
served by three or fewer stations; 55% are able to re- 
ceive one to three television stations. 



NUMBER OF PERCENTOF 

STATIONS RECEIVED TOTAL TV HOMES 

1 15% 

2 12% 

3 28% 

4 13% 

5-6 6% 

7-8 24% 

9-11 2% 



100% 



5. Is a trend toward multiple-set tv homes developing? 



SOURCE: See below 

NEW YORK 




9% have two or more sets 



Study by Advertest Research in New 
York metropolitan area showed over 
9% of homes had two or more 
television sets in working condition as 
of month of survey in May 1954. 



Arizona State College study for k 
Phoenix stations (KPHO-TV, KOOL- ~ 

KOY-TV, KTYL-TV) showed 3.3% of 
homes in Greater Phoenix area have 
over one television set, January 1954 



PHOENIX 




3.3% have tivo or more sets 



t y u g c- \ p 

\ 1 H i l> 



page 



6. How do tv and radio families compare on a socio-economic basis? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., January 1954 



COUNTY 



TERRITORY 



SIZE 



AGE OF OLDEST 
CHILD 




RADIO 




RADIO 




RADIO 



FAMILY SIZE 



HIGHEST 
EDUCATION 



OCCUPATION 
(head of house) 



AGE OF 
HOUSEWIFE 



Q|. 



Bl Grimm 



45 



42 



J-4 



53 



50 



31 



High 
School 







32 




None 

15 16 —I 1 

■ B " 



39 



36 



3554 



_■» Retired & I 

D ■ B B " 



TV 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 



flaps Ix'iicccii tv (did radio futitllU's narrow as tv grows throughout the V.S. 



A few seasons ago, when tv sets still cost $400 and up, the tv home 
was far more likely to be an upper-middle class (or higher) family. 
Today, with set prices having tumbled, and tv having spread into 
almost two out of every three U.S. homes, the gaps between tv 
homes and radio homes are growing smaller. In other words, when 
you talk of tv homes in metropolitan areas you are in effect talking 
about radio homes, and you are comparing tv with itself. 

However, there are still some important socio-economic differences 
worth noting in planning fall 1954 advertising: 

LOCATION DIFFERENCES: You still can't blanket the country 
with tv, no matter how you try. Radio is distributed almost evenly 
in all counties and major territories; tv is concentrated more in the 
most-populated counties (since these make up metropolitan markets) 



and in the populous East and Midwest. 

FAMILY DIFFERENCES: In the general paltern of comparison be- 
tween tv homes and radio homes there are slightly more large 
families (on a percentage basis; not in numbers) in the tv group. 
That's because tv was bought first by families with kids, later by 
one and two-person families, as tv grew. 

OCCUPATION DIFFERENCES: As tv grew, and moved downward 
in the penetration of the U.S. market from white-collar, middle- 
income families, the occupational gaps have narrowed. An ex- 
amination of the chart above will show that the differences in occu- 
pation (which have a close relationship with income and education) 
are not very startling between tv and radio homes. Latest growths 
have been in homes of manual workers. 



TV BASICS 



pagt 3 






WORLD'S TALLEST 
MAN-MADE STRUCTURE! 

KWTV 

OKLAHOMA'S NO. 1 TV STATION! 

NO. 1 IN HEIGHT— 1572-foot tower, tallest in the world! 
NO. 1 IN POWER— 316,000 watts! 
NO. 1 IN COVERAGE— will bring viewing to Oklahoma 
areas never before served by television! 

The first 35 feet of KWTV's massive tower (at left) swings into place. 
This section weighs 64,000 pounds. In the other picture workmen 
set the solid steel cap on a cluster of 21 porcelain insulators. The 
insulators are four inches in diameter. 

NOW is the time to start your (sales) building with KWTV. Ask us 
for the complete story! 



~*€& tf^ OKLAHOMA CITY; 



AFFILIATED MANAGEMENT K0MA CBS • REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



12 JULY 1954 



163 



it Tvh>risii>n vi<>tviny habits 




1. How does tv viewing vary according to time of day? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., March 1954 



Total U.S. homes using tv by hours of day 



1954 



Homes reached (000) 







18,320 






17.795 








16.194 














14.343 


14.591 1 

13.148 




11,028 








10.543 



4,849 ^■■1— | 5,029 
4.375 M.5 10 



E3 - ■ 



757 



,981 



1,534 1782 



6A.M. 8 9 10 11 12 1P.M. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 



2. How does amount of time tv homes spend with radio and tv compare? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen < 


3o., 1953 and 1954 (Aprii 1953-March 1954) 
















5.77 






Time 


. — 


nd with tv and radio 








tv homes spe 












5.19 


5.35 


5.20 










5.03 


TV HOURS 
PER DAY, 


4.88 






4.72 






4.20 


APR '53 TO 


4.22 










3.77 




3.82 


MAR. '54 


3.67 




1.66 














1.84 


1.75 


1.79 


1.81 


1.94 


radio hours 


1.76 1 






1.74 


1.72 


PER DAY. 

APR. '53 TO 

MAR. '54 




1.55 
IS 


1.46 1.48 







APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. 

1953 

In hours and minutei. 



SEPT. OCT. NOV. 



DEC. JAN. FEB. 

1954 



MAR 



IY BASICS p*9* > 



playing the 
percentages 
pays off in 
Harrisbnrg 



WTPA 



MARKET: Harrisburg is the leading "Qualitv Mar- 
ket" of Pennsylvania .... first in per capita sales, sec- 
ond in per capita income, third in drug sales, fourth in 
automotive and total retail sales. 

RATINGS: 80% of the highest rated night time 
shows are on WTPA .... 60% of the top daytime shows 
are seen on WTPA. A full time program schedule builds 
ratings for shows, sales for advertisers. 

CIRCULATION: In May 1953, only 37% of the 
homes in Harrisburg could receive television .... in 
April 1954, 66% of all homes have television receivers, 
with 94% conversion to receive local stations. 

COLOR: 100% converted to network color since 
early in 1954, WTPA was the first station in Central 

Pennsylvania to transmit color By December 

1954, local color film and slide equipment will be in- 
stalled. 

PROMOTION: Every program is exploited to the 
fullest by all promotional media .... air announce- 
ments .... in daily newspaper advertising .... taxi 
cards .... billboards and direct mail. 

represented by 
Headley-Reed TV 



TELEVISION, HARRISBURG, PA. 



12 JULY 1954 



165 



3. How does tv audience composition vary with the time of day? 



SOURCE: American Research Bjreau, March 1954 

Audience composition, vien-ers-per-set: use them together 



MONDAY-FRIDAY 


MEN 


WOMEN 


KIDS 'UNDER 16) 


VIEWERS-PER-SET 


6-9 AM 


...29%... 


...45%.. 


...26%..- 


22 




L.L 


9-N00N 


9% 


....57%.. 


...34%... 


1.8 






N00N-3PM 


...15%... 


....52%... 


...33%... 


1.8 


3-6 PM 


...14%... 


....33%... 


....53%.... 


22 






6 PM-MID. SUN. THRU 
SAT. (entire week) 


..33%... 


...41%... 


....26%... 


.2.7 | 



Chart above, prepared especially for SPONSOR by American Re- 
search Bureau, is based on a socio-economic cross-section of U.S. 
viewers, not just a random sample. It reflects viewing in urban and 
rural areas in every U.S. county within 150 miles of a tv signal, thus 
has great significance for tv-minded agencies and advertisers. ARB's 



James W. Seiler, director, gives this warning however: "It's impor- 
tant to realize that audience composition must be used in conjunction 
with viewers per set. There is a higher percentage of women in the 
daytime audience, for instance, but with a higher viewers-per-set at 
night that means more women per- 1 ,000-viewing-homes at night." 



4. What is the seasonal variation in television viewing in all U.S. radi 



Nighttime (6 p.m. to midnight) 



% homes using TV Daytime (9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) 

60 

50 
40 

30 
20 
10 



APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. 

1952 






TV BASICS pw - 



5. What types of shows were most popular this past season (53-54) ? 

SOURCE: American Research Bureau monthly average ratings, Oct. '53 to May '54 
HANK PROGRAM NETWORK SHOW TYPE SPONSOR 



SEASON RATING 



1. 1 Love Lucy 


CBS . 


. . .Situation comedy 


. . .Philip Morris 63.1 


2. Dragnet 


NBC . 


. . Detective drama . 


. . .Liggett & Myers 61.0 






3. You Bet Your Life 


NBC . 


. . . Quiz-comedy 


. . Chrysler Corp., DeSoto Div. 53.6 


4. Talent Scouts 


CBS 


. .Talent search 


. T, J, Lipton 47.9 


5. Jackie Gleason 


CBS . 


. Comedy-variety 


. . Nestle Co,, Schaeffer Pen; Schick 46.4 








6. Milton Berle 


NBC . 


. Comedy-variety 


. . .Buick Motor Co. 44.7 








7. Life of Riley 


NBC . 


. Situation comedy 


...Gulf Oil Co, 43.1 






8. Godfrey and Friends . . 


..CBS . 


..Variety-music 


Toni ; Frigidaire, CBS Colu'bia ; Pillsbury . 42.9 


9. Our Miss Brooks 


CBS 


. .Situation comedy 


. . .General Foods 40.7 



10. Toast of the Town CBS ... .Variety-music Lincoln-Mercury Dealers 



40.2 



The "top 10" figures above are for the entire 1953-54 tv season. 
The show type which appears most often is situation comedy with 
three of the top 10 shows falling in this category: "I Love Lucy," 
"Life of Riley" and "Our Miss Brooks." Show types with two entries 
each on the list were: comedy-variety and variety-music. Comedy- 
variety is used to designate the kind of program built around a 



comedian with his supporting acts. Variety-music is a less precise 
term since it ranges from "Godfrey and Friends" to "Toast of the 
Town." Of the 10 shows three are on film: "Lucy," "Dragnet," 
"Riley." ARB's top 10 for '52-53: "Lucy," "Talent Scouts," "You 
Bet Your Life," "Godfrey and Friends," "Dragnet," "Comedy Hour," 
"Star Theatre," "What's My Line," "Show of Shows," "Miss Brooks." 




>res (April 1951-April 1954)? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. (Nielsen Television Index 1951-1954) 



Daytime (9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) 



Nighttime (6 p.m. to midnight) 



% homes using TV 



60 



*> # 


*m m 


\+** 


'***! 


I HI ■ 


**- 














-* 


*■• 


,♦*' 


-. 


... 


*N 


• 










% * 


N 


♦* 






*< 


^ 


>♦• 


w^ 




™ m 
















\ 


^., 


,••' 


>♦♦ 




















































, 





































































50 
40 

30 

20 

10 
J 

r . NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. 

1953 "54 



TV BASICS W * 



• • 



### Cost of U'lovisioii advertising 



1. What's the cost-per-1,000 homes of network tv programs by types? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. 

Evening once-a-tceelt half-hour slum- eomnarisonj (two weeks ended i:t February 1 954 J 

MYSTERY DRAMA 



$7.78 (24.5 RATING) 



TALENT VARIETY 



$8.44 (23.7 RATING) 



SITUATION COMEDY 



$8.78 (28.8 RATING) 



VARIETY MUSIC 



$9.03 (27.0 RATING) 



GENERAL DRAMA 



$9.26 (26.1 RATING) 



GENERAL VARIETY 



$9.38 (26.0 RATING) 



OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 



$10.33 (19.1 RATING) 



OUARTER-HR. SHOWS 



$6.96 (14.2 RATING) 



ONE-HOUR SHOWS 



$10.96 (37.1 RATING) 



2. How much will color tv add to the cost of live b&w tv shows? 

SOURCE: J. L. Van Volkenburg, president, CBS TV, speech at 4A's meeting, April 1954 



B&W SHOW, CIRCA 1958 (NIGHT V 2 HOUR) 



NO. STATIONS 


TIME. CABLE COSTS 


TALENT. PRODUCTION 


COST-PERM 


A 100 


$58,000 


$25,000 


$2.31 



COLOR SHOW*, CIRCA 1958 (NIGHT y 2 HOUR) 



NO. STATIONS 



TIME. CABLE COSTS 



100 



$60,000 



TALENT. PRODUCTION! 



$31,000 



on rtfulu i ren tlnclu 



TV BASICS 



page 7 



COST-PERM 



$2.54 



In Youngstown, Ohio-the 32nd U.S. Marker-it's WKBN-TV... 

...in network and 
programs 

...in local live 
j programs 

in a major TV market! 



138,218 TV households — almost a half 
million viewers — now receiving Channel 27 

(Based on the May 15-21, 1954 ARB) 

Of the two Youngstown stations, WKBN-TV 
network and film programs are favorites. 
WKBN-TV has 4 of the first 5 ... 8 of the 
first 10 ... 12 of the first 15 ... and 20 of 
the 28 programs rated 19.0 o r better! 

WKBN-TV local live programs capture the 
first 9 positions . . . and take 9 of the first 10 
ratings' 



Program 

1. Polka Party 

2. Rucker's Rumpus Room 

3. Grizzly Pete 

4. Tip Top Clubhouse 

5. Local Edition News 

6. Rambling Reporter 

7. News, 6:30 p.m. 

8. This Week at Home 

9. Sports-Weather 
10. Kitchen Korner 

(Source: ARB 



Station 

WKBN-TV 



ARB Ratinq 

16.3 



WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
WKBN-TV 
Station B 
May 15-21, 1954) 



'Source: 1954 SRDS Consumer Markets 



WKBN-TV Channel 27 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

FULLY EQUIPPED FOR NETWORK COLOR-CASTING 



Program 

1 • I Love Lucy 

2 Jackie Gleason 
3 - Hit Parade 

4. Godfrey & Friends 

5. Red Buttons 

6. Dragnet 

7. Strike It Ri C h 

8. Racket Squad 

9 Our Miss Brooks 
0. Toast of the Town 
'• I've Got A Secret 
2 - This Is Your Life 
3. Beat The Clock 

4 - Four Star Playhouse 
5. TV Hour 

5- Milton Berle 
7 ■ Martha Raye 
1. Meet Millie 

'• Comedy Hour 

• TV Playhouse 

• Two For The Money 
■ My Friend Irma 

Place The Face 

Studio One 

Make Room For Daddy 

Playhouse of Stars 

Big Story 

Dollar A Second 



Station ARB Rating 

WKBN-TV 44.3 
WKBN-TV 36.1 
Station B 316 
WKBN-TV 30.5 
WKBN-TV 27.6 
Station B 27.0 
WKBN-TV 26.5 
WKBN-TV 25.9 
WKBN-TV 25.6 
WKBN-TV 25.3 
WKBN-TV 23.8 
Station B 23 8 
WKBN-TV 23.5 
WKBN-TV 22.7 
WKBN-TV 22.5 
Station B 22.5 
Station B 217 
WKBN-TV 21.6 
Station B 2l.d 
Station B 21.6 
WKBN-TV 20.5 
WKBN-TV 20.5 
WKBN-TV 20.0 
WKBN-TV 19.7 
WKBN-TV )9.5 
WKBN-TV 19.5 
Station B | 9 5 

WKBN-TV 19 



.(Source: ARB — May 15-19, 1954) 
^Presented N aflo „ a „ y by Pau( „ ^^ 

CBS • DUMONT • ABC 



Co. 



12 JULY 1954 



169 



3. What are some typical taient-production costs for network tv shows? t 



SOURCE: Network Tv Comparagraph which appears in alternate issues of SPONSOR. These ■■ ■. E3-54 season prices 

MYSTERY-CRIME-DRAMA II/DIEJVCE PARTIC. & l»l\M. 



THE WEB $11,000 

ROCKY KING $9,800 

PLAINCLOTHESMAN $8,000 

MAN BEHIND THE BADGE $14,000 

MARTIN KANE $14,000 

SUSPENSE $13,500 

DANGER $10,000 

MAN AGAINST CRIME (film) $26,000 

BIG TOWN (film) $21,000 

JUSTICE $17,500 

DRAGNET (film) $25,000 

MARK SABER (film) $9,000 



SITUATION COMEDY 

I LOVE LUCY (film) $35,000 

MR. PEEPERS $19,000 

BURNS & ALLEN (film) $25,000 

MEET MILLIE (film) $20,000 

I MARRIED JOAN (film) $23,000 

MY LITTLE MARGIE (film) $22,500 

MAMA $22,500 

MY FRIEND IRMA $28,000 

OUR MISS BROOKS (film) $26,000 

THE GOLDBERGS $18,500 

GENERAL DRAMA 



GOODYEAR PLAYHOUSE) t „ nnn 

PHILC0 PLAYHOUSE ) * dZ,uuu 

ROBERT MONTGOMERY $35,000 

FIRESIDE THEATRE (film) $20,000 

KRAFT THEATRE $20,000 

FORD THEATRE $23,000 

LUX VIDEO THEATRE $20,000 

SCHLITZ PLAYHOUSE (film) $26,000 

YOU ARE THERE $20,500 

Indil ateil. 



WHAT'S MY LINE? $9,500 

I'VE GOT A SECRET $8,000 

THE NAME'S THE SAME $7,500 

PLACE THE FACE $11,000 

DR. I. Q $4,000 

BREAK THE BANK $12,500 

TWO FOR 1HE MONEY $12,000 

STRIKE IT RICH $8,500 

NAME THAT TUNE $12,000 

DOWN YOU GO $6,000 

DOLLAR A SECOND $10500 

VARIETY-COMEDY 



SAT. NIGHT REVUE (per 30 min.) $15,000 

TOAST OF THE TOWN $30,000 

GODFREY'S FRIENDS $45,000 

JACKIE GLEASON (total hour) $72,000 

COLGATE COMEDY HOUR $70,000 

DAVE GARROWAY SHOW $25,000 

SERIAL DRAMA 

LOVE OF LIFE $8,500 

SEARCH FOR TOMORROW $8,500 

GUIDING LIGHT $10,000 

HAWKINS FALLS (per i/ 4 hour) $3,500 

SECRET STORM $10,000 

Jl \ EMLE SHOW S 



DING DONG SCHOOL (per 30 min,) $1,160 

HOWDY DOODY (per 15 min,) $1,600 

SPACE PATROL $6,500 

SKY KING (film) $19,000 

\OTE: Prices for many film slums are not 
actual cost of production, but represent the av- 
erage cttst per show over the full season, includ- 
ing both originals and reruns. Resulting price 
per show may be only r>()-7(r°? c of real produc- 
tion cost. 



REPRINTS OF TV RASICS are available on request. Special price for (/ttnnfift; orders 



TV BASICS 



l /i 1 1) i 8 




Vice President, Walter Hagwm^Solf, Division 
of Wilson Sporting Goods Company, says: 

"To me, the most significant characteristic 
of the Grand Rapids area — is growth. 
That characteristic was evident when we 
established our business here in 1939. 
It is just as evident today in every economic 
direction. WOOD-TV is the natural 
outcome of this sound, area development . . . 
and will be a potent factor in its 
continuance." 





WOODIand-TV is big territory! 



In growth — Walter Hagen Golf is a typical 
Grand Rapids industry. Production has in- 
creased to approximately half a million clubs 
a year. In golf — it's unique. Walter Hagen 
equipment is sold only by golf professionals. 
It's made by golfers, too! But that's not sur- 
prising in WOODland-TV ... an area famous 
for fine courses. 

In summer, WOODlanders share the fairways 
with millions of tourists — who spend an 

*U.S. Department of Commerce 



estimated $200,000,000* in Western Michi- 
gan annually. Retail sales skyrocket — in 
the primary Grand Rapids area; in Muske- 
gon, Battle Creek, Lansing and Kalamazoo. 
And this rich market is all yours, with 
WOOD-TV — first station in the country to 
deliver 316.000 watts from a tower 1000' 
above average terrain. For top coverage of 
Western Michigan — select WOOD -TV — 
Grand Rapids' only television station! 



I 



WOOD-TV Oi 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 



GRANDWOOD BROADCASTING COMPANY • NBC. BASIC; ABC. CBS. DuMONT. SUPPLEMENTARY • ASSOCIATED WITH WFBM-AM AND 
TV, INDIANAPOLIS. IND. • WFDF. FLINT. MICH.. WEOA. EVANSVILLE. IND. • WOOD-AM. WOOD-TV. REPRESENTED BY Y 




12 JULY 1954 



171 




iV Television's bit lings 



1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net tv {'49-54)? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



NETWORK 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1 952 


I953 


I954 
First 4 Months 




$1,391,991 


$6,628,662 


TT8;585791T 


$18,353,003 


$21,110,680 


$10,478,129 


$3,446,893 


$13,011,831 


$42,470,844 


$69,058,548 


$97,466,809 


$42,980,081 


$955,525 


(No report) 


$7,761,506 


$10,140,656 


$12,374,360 


$4,827,665 


$6,500,104 


$21,185,692 


$59,171,452 


$83,242,573 


$96,633,807 


$41,642,160 



YEARLY TOTALS 



19J9J $12,294,513 
'ISSOl $40,826,185 




19S1] $127,989,713 
I952] $180,794,780 




1953 $227,585,656 




2. How much money have advertisers spent for spot tv time ('49-'54)? 



SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates 

100 




^ «^ 7 b\ %: 



-x- 





1949 — $7,775,013 1950 — $25,034,000 1951 — $59,733,000 1952 — $80,235,000 1953 — $100,000,000 

Dollar flgurci show national spot revenues of stations AFTER tnde discounts of fre- 'SPONSOn estimate based on television Industry si ast«. 

quenry and dollar volume; Bl PORE mmlsslons to reps, agencies, brokers. 



TV BASICS page 9 



SEARCHING? 





This is WAVE-TV's coverage 
area, based on engineering 
studies and mail response. 



KENTUCKY 




If you're searching for the biggest TV AUDIENCE 
in Kentucky and Southern Indiana — 
ASK YOUR REGIONAL DISTRIBUTORS! 

Go ahead!— telephone your distributor in Louisville- 
then in Evansville (101 air miles) — 

then in Lexington (78 air miles 

Ask each "What TV stations do your neighbors prefer?" 

The calls will cost you a few dollars, but may save you many! 



WAVE-TV 



CHANNEL 



3 



LOUISVILLE 



FIRST IN KENTUCKY 

Affiliated with NBC, ABC, DUMONT 

NBC SPOT SALES, Exclusive National Representatives 




12 JULY 1954 



173 




Want to Build Your Own Radio Network? 



Trouble with wired network advertising sometimes 
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Grandad. Flexible enough? You can build your own 
network. It's simple. List the markets where you 
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We'll take your list and furnish a network that 
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active network in America and the most flexible. 
Call us, write us, wire us. We'll help you build your 
own radio network to follow your specific sales 
pattern . . ."tailor-made" for your markets. 



• WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE 



CH I CAGQ 

111 West Washington St. 
STite 2 6303 

LOS ANGELES 
1330 Wilshne Blvd. 
Dunkirk 3-2910 



NEW YORK 

b?,0 Filth Avenue 
Pl«» 7-1460 

SAN FRANCISCO 

57 Post Street 
SUtler 1-7440 



INTAKE YOUR CHOICE 

A handful of stations or the network . . . 
a minute or a full hour . . . it's up to 
you, your needs. 

P^MORt FOR YOUR DOLLAR 

No premium cost for individualized pro- 
gramming. Network coverage for less 
than "spot" cost for same stations. 

k^ONt ORDER DOES THE JOB 

All bookkeeping and details ore done 
by KEYSTONE, yet the best time and 
ploce are chosen for you. 



w 




COMPLETE MARKET INFORMATION AND RATES 

E 



DCDU: 



THE VOICE 



Reyslone 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM, inc. 



OF HOMETOWN AND RURAL AMERICA 



174 



SPONSOR 



Thi« Compnragrapft ..|.p...i> r<-gulat-lu in alternate 
isxues. If trill appear next .'* tiiffiixl lu.~il 



M N 



1A.T 

IB5M 






*• «",«*• 



*J IIOCO 



lulmu i flOOO 



170D i.> . f L 
D-F-B IJJOO 



RADIO COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY 



W*de . 2500 



WT m-f 17 W 



Ktltrr-WIUT. 



»9W 


,r. m 


L 


%■ 


,« maD , 


Dlr 


T( P 


~^T~ 


Gibrl 


Im 


."" 


m f 


p!S5 


w.I 


*l •arid 
«i Lab. 


Com* 


Tim* 


Ill 





Llirati A Mjin 



Star, (rum Paih 



John Vindtrcoofc 



D.loM Oat' 






Johi C. Swiyzi 



Nighttime 12 July 1954 

FRIDAY I SATURDA 



Tak* ■ Hunk* 



FattlM MV1 



'Hi- TbrH Plant 



far tfta 
laoay 

-nrtlLrd 
I fold. 



Etaratt Htilvi 



WEN 

1 ir Sons, Inc. 



. V. Lo Roaa 4 Sons, In< 

Pal & Jack Stio« ™«ud. La Rosa Prodnc 



W-l 



Th* Big Prevli 

N M M "latS 



Otnlfl S*h«T 



THOUGHT FOR FOOD 

merchandisers 

Week by week food advertisers 
prove, with renewals, the 
effectiveness of the guaranteed, 
consistent, chain-wide 

WPEN-PENN FRUIT Co. 
merchandising plan. Bond Bread has 
renewed for a third cycle; 
Brock's Frozen French Fries for a 
second cycle, as has La Rosa 
Spaghetti Products and 
Wilson's Ideal Dog Food . . . and now, 

also, Endust, Mrs. Schlorer's 
Mayonnaise and Mission 



THE 



Beverages have joined 

PAT JACK 



SHOW 



9:05 to 10:00 AM DAILY on 

THE PERSONALITIES STATION 



WPEN 



Represented nationally by Gill-Pern a, Inc. 
\,-« York 1 bic.go 



1 and explanations to help u<>" use thlw chart Sponsor* fi*red alphabeftVnllu with agency and time on air 



BflEVIATIONS; C, Chlr.iu. Clw. ClW 



..JBREVIATION*: All. ilUroAW: «. mldnliljl; ■, wm^ur prwlueia;^ 



NBC BM 1-1 JO pm 



. ■■,.,., Miii-.im NBC. 

. Jnhn r Murraj: CBS. 



0-»S pm; NBC. 



■£F1h:'w. Tb, t S-nVum'ifBi I" P«A«i ■ l " 1 WWi M ™ 1 *""•• *" Auimbliea «< G*d. W *\ Li-ui«t ABC. Bun 

tit auilont lira Multl-K«MH* PI*" ll)80 ' J"° ■.«■•«« 



: CmIUI Cammmtary orlflaaL** v 






~~i u plof.«*d a 



Ctiavrel.t MXiti I'.innb.ll h>.l.l NBC. TU. T 
Ohrlitlu Hal Ctiuren. Olenn -Jordan BioHwl: 



JlHtoa: UBS. Bud 



t* Sat*ty Rwar. Hum: ABC. ¥ 10 pa I 

. Wattt,. McCann Krl£*uoe ABC. all Bu 
Oil, TAB: NBC. Tb MM pa 



Tha*. Himm Bravlnt. Cunptiall-UIUiuo: CUB. 



Mln.. Kuill Moiul: CBS, I 



jvlwry Board, Uri Bin h HI 



Brat,. JWT CBB, 






mania; O- Hnrnun MBB. 
. RipHI"."' ParaaTlrr ABC. 



I Mf«.. n..r,*huc- i 



Stewart Warner Cera.. Hacfttlarid. Arenrd 



»Vrfl 



VM PENN BROAD(_ASr(fc CfJMPANY 

IF 1%. Vt— 



?t~T& V 



llJE^ 



ft Jack Shot 



, Ideal Dog Fo 



H^v 






L » U 1 U imI TlB Thl * r " m P""« r ''' h «PP™" rrnulorlt) in alK-riiMfr 
Ml Mill HOM Iswism. 11 irlll appear nrxl 9 tiinux Mir. 1 

W*"^^ SUNDAY 1 MONDAY 1 




RADIO 


COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 










Dayt 


me 12 J u 


ly 195 4 L 


ffl 


Jm ' "wj w ffrai^er 


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 


1 FRIDAY SATURDAY 




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Tar IJ-T 


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or-. mioo 

K H .hi M!H» 
EW I2S30 




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-ss™ 


Bob Smllh 


Ill Baffwai Sin 

oofsr. Olstorjih 


• ISO* 


•iDllltf news 

hi ■. h 


'"> ( l« !••■■ 


ttw Wlf* Uvtr 

IT. 11. til 1 T 


Shaw 




'EH? 




HPV 


Waiter* tIJDO 


C»"T^ 


,,,, 


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WhliDf'o ItricU 

....-!. WW) 


m 




irjT^Jp 


.... th< Bank 






Mil** Labi 


■wlrJ'wAip 




LJh l*yt 


Isawmili 


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latao |M75 


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On the Washington scene.. 



Her 

column 

tops 

'email! 



You might not think it, to look at slim, 
diminutive Elinor Lee . . . but she's one of 
Washington's best-known, most influen- 
tial women. For one thing, she's food 
editor-columnist of Washington's largest 
newspaper, The Washington Post and 
Times Herald. For another, she's the dean 
of women broadcasters in the capital, 
with an award-studded record of more 
than 25 years as a dietician, homemaker 
and consumer service expert. (One of her 
WTOP shows was sponsored by Potomac 
Electric Power Co. for 11 years!) 

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column of the air, "At Home with Elinor 
Lee," is (by a wide margin) Washington's 
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remember that we have the highest 
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ton's most interesting woman, WTOP 
Radio's Elinor Lee. 

WTOP RADIO 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



^^■^•^•5fe-sfe-Sfe*5fe^ 





Each frame — each scene in the print must be perfectly matched to assure an out- 
standing film production. Leading producers, directors and cameramen know that Precision 
processing guarantees that individual attention. 

Skilled hands and exclusive Maurer-de signed equipment are teamed to bring these perfect 
results to each Precision print. Even more important, continuing research constantly 
improves techniques that are already accepted as unequalled in the field. 

In everything there is one best . . . in film processing, it's Precision. 



P\R\E 




ION 



FILM LABORATORIES, |NC 

21 WEST A6TH STREET. NEW YORK 36, N.Y 






A division of J. A. Maurer, Inc. 






182 



SPONSOR 




FILM REPRESENTS OVER HALF OF LOCAL PROGRAMING 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the six pages of this report 

Q What percent of all local programing is on film? page I 

II What type of film do stations use? page 2 

II If on- much nighttime network programing is on film? page 2 

Q How big an audience can reruns of film shows get? page 3 

II How many episodes in a season's film cycle are missed? page 4 

II What do station men thinh of reruns? page 4 

Q How much time is left for film outside networh hours? page 5 

11 \\ hat should you look out for in huying film? page G 

12 JULY 1954 183 



M The extent film is used in television 




1. What percent of total programing hours of tv stations is on film? 

SOURCE: Questions 1-4 on these pages are answered by charts adapted from NARTB 1954 report on film. NARTB surveyed 120 tv stations 
operating before 15 May 1953 in markets of varying size. Week surveyed was 7-13 June 1953: 60 stations replied. 

, LOCAL- , ALL , 

STAT.ONS REPLY. NG TO QUESTIONNAIRE * R L J* E *£!"" "aWAlT " "Z*. " K 

GrOlip 1 - stations in markets up to 50,000 fi families) 18.1% , , 45. 9 f ( . . .64.0%. . .36.0% 

GrOUp 2 (9 stations in markets o i.OOO U families) 22,4%. . .23.4%. . .45.8%. . .54.2% 

GrOUp 3 (28 stations in markets o) 150-500,000 t\ families) 21.0% . . .25.3%. . .46.3%'. . .53.7% 

GrOUp 4 (6 stations in markets o) 500, L.000, tv families) . . .22.6%. . 32.3/ { . .54.7%. . .45.3% 

GrOUp 5 9 ttations n markets of L,000,000 or mort tv families) . . .31.9%. . .40.4%. . .71.8%'. . .28.2% 

Many admen have wondered just how much time tv stations devote kets have almost the same percentage of film programing as sta- 

to local-level film programing of all types. The answer is contained tions in the smallest tv cities, due usually to the fact that they 

in the NARTB-compiled chart above; it may be a surprise to many. go on the air earlier and stay on later. "Film" programs above 

All stations do more film programing percentagewise than live, re- include syndicated program series, feature movies and Westerns, 

gardless of market size. Oddly enough, stations in the largest mar- short subjects, newsreels, "free" tv films 

i mm .in- i't total programing ha 

2. How many hours of local programing by tv stations are on film ? 

SOURCE: See question I. 



STATIONS REPLYING 



LIVE LOCAL 
HRS. 



TOTAL 

FILM HRS. 



Group 1 stations 10.37 26.54 

Group 2 stations 21.43 22.39 

Group 3 stations 23.20 28.03 

Group 4 stations 24.01 34.02 

Group 5 stations 32.50 42.20 



Wore "program" hours m<>au more "film" hours 

As chart at ieft shows, the bigger the market the mere hours per 
week stations are on the air. Bu* even though the largest tv outlets 
in the largest markets air more than twice as many program hours 
as the smallest outlets, film shows continue to play an important role, 
exceeding live programs in number of hours in every case. Thus, 
local film programing is ahead on two counts: ( I ) the percentage of 
local time that is devoted to film; (2) the number of local filn 
hours as compared with rhe number of local live hours. 



3. What percent of all local programing does film represent? 

SOURCE: See question I. 



STATIONS IN 

Group 1 
72%> 



STATIONS IN 



Group 2 

70 



5V 



STATIONS IN 



Group 3 

%> 



54^- 



STATIONS IN 

Group 4 



59 



< . 



STATIONS IN 

Group 5 



56 



< ' 



This chart again shows that stations find film a low-cost, profitable form 
of local programing. Stations in every size markets use film for 
better than half of their local programing. Stations with the smallest 
coverage area rely on film more than any other size station, 



programing an average of 72% of all local origin telecasts with 
film. Next heaviest film users on a percentage basis are stations 
in markets of 500.000 to a million tv families. These stations 
use film for 59% of their entire local programing hours. 



BASICS /'";/' i 




The color camera can pick up the slightest change in 
an actress' complexion. But unless the radio relay and coaxial 
cable routes that carry this picture are specially equipped, 
her blush would never reach the nation's screens. 

It is a big job to install new equipment, necessary for 

color transmission, along thousands of channel miles in the Bell 

System network. Personnel must also be trained in the 

new techniques of transmitting color signals. 

But the work is well under way, with facilities now serving 
an increasing number of cities with color television. 
The Bell System will keep pace with the industry's needs for 
color television networks. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

PROVIDING TRANSMISSION CHANNELS FOR INTERCITY RADIO AND TELEVISION TODAY AND TOMORROW 



Bell System technicians testing transmission of the 
color signal over radio relay facilities. 




12 JULY 1954 



185 



4. What type of film do stations use (by weekly hours and percent)? 



SOURCE: See question I. 



FEATURE FILM H RS. 


SYNDICATED FILM H RS. 


SHORT SUBJECT 
FILM HRS. 


FILM SHOT 
BY STATION 


FREE FILM 


Group 1 stations 12.04(44,8%) 


9.41 (36%) 


1.55(7%) 


.08 ( .7%) 


3.07(11.5%) 


Group 2 stations 9.26(41.7%) 


8.33 (37.7%) 


1.33(6.8%) 


.55 (2.6%) 


2.32(11.2%) 


Group 3 stations 12.57(46.3%) 


10.53(38.8%) 


1.50(6.5%) 


.11 ( .6%) 


2.12 ( 7.8%) 


Group 4 stations 21.27(63.1%) 


6.40(19.6%) 


3.10(9.3%) 


.29(1.4%) 


2.16(6.6%) 


Group 5 stations 29.03 (68.5%) 


7.30 (17.7%) 


3.58 (9.4%) 


.26(1.1%) 


1.23(3.3%) 



5. How much nighttime network programing is on film? 

SOURCE: SPONSOR'S Comparagraph of Network Tv Programs for May I954 



LIVE HOURS 

NETWORK WEEKLY 

ABC 17'/ 2 

CBS 221/2 

DTN 15'/ 4 

NBC 19'/ 4 

* Does not include shows which are partially film. 



FILM HOURS' 
WEEKLY 


TOTAL HOURS 
LIVE & FILM 


°. FILM IS OF 
TOTAL 


7/2 


25 


30% 


4 


26'/ 2 


15% 





IB/4 


0% 


5% 


25 


23% 



■ 



6. How many nighttime half-hour shows are on film? 

SOURCE: SPONSOR'S Comparagraph of Network Tv Programs for May 1954 



TOTAL NO. ',-HOUR NO. ON 

NETWORK SHOWS WEEKLY FILM" 



% ON 
FILM 



ABC 
CBS 
DTN 

NBC 



30 
36 
18 
13 



15 
8 


11 



* Does not include shows which are partially film. 



50% 

22% 

0% 

31% 



26% of iiif/ftf half -hour shows are film 

A comparison between the proportion of half-hour shows on 
film and total nighttime programing on film shows the strong 
trend on networks to half-hour film shows. Live night- 
time variety shows and hour dramas lower the percentage of 
film programing in total nighttime network programing. 
ABC's ratio of film to live among half-hour shows is 50% 
film; of total nighttime programing, 30% film. CBS has 22% 
of half-hour nighttime shows on film, 15% of all programing; 
NBC has 31% of half-hour nighttime shows on film, or 
23% of total nighttime programing. Du Mont is the only 
network that programs live onlv. 



FILM BASICS ! pagi 2 





C3CHHH 



.©: 



47,000 WATTS E.R.P. 

NETWORK AFFILIATIONS ^j^ ' ABC 

SERVING THE ROCKFORD-MADISON 

AREA 




ROCKFOR D.ILLINOIS 



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NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



12 JULY 1954 



187 



MM Reruns of film programs 

1. How big an audience can reruns of film shows get? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. Analysis of Repeat Films, December 1953; done for ABC, CBS, NBC film divisions. 



Summer ratings of film reruns higher than shows run for first iinu- in summer 

SHOWS WHICH HAVE FILM RERUNS CONTROL CROUP WITH NO RERUNS foi comparison) 



WINTER: Ratings for orig- 
inal Mill I . t' I i I 1 1 1 s 1 1 1 i \\ B 



SUMMER: Ratings 

Mills Of s.'IMlr BllOWfl 



High Show: 


46.7 


High Show: 


40.9 


Low Show: 


12.9 


Low Show: 


14.6 


AVERAGE ALL: 


33.9 


AVERACE ALL: 


28.0 



AVERACE DECLINE: 
5.9 rating points 



WINTER: Ratings foi eon 
1 1 ul group hi shows 



SUMMER: Ratings replace- 
ment shows run tirst time- 



High Show: 


56.6 


High Show: 


39.4 


Low Show: 


13.3 


Low Show: 


12.0 


AVERACE ALL: 


31.6 


AVERACE ALL: 


24.0 



AVERACE DECLINE: 
7.6 rating points 



.Share of audience film reruns higher than shows run for tirst time in summer 

SHOWS WHICH HAVE FILM RERUNS CONTROL CROUP WITH NO RERUNS (for comparison) 



WINTER: Share of audi- 
ence of original run of 
film shows 



SUMMER: Share of audi- 
ence Of Ifl'Ulls lit' S.'llllr 

shows 



52.1% 



52.2% 



The A. C. Nielsen Co. made a study of the audience that the 
original run of a film show commands during winter compared with 
a rerun of the show during summer. Nielsen than took a control 
group of shows falling into the same program categories as the 
film shows for comparison, checking the size of the audience these 



WINTER: Share of audi- 
ence of control group 

shows 



SUMMER: Share of audi- 
ence for replacement run 
for first time 



48.4% 



50.2% 



commanded as first runs in winter compared with their replacement 
shows in summer. Nielsen found ( I ) the average non-repeat show 
lost more rating points than the average film rerun in summer; (2) 
film reruns during the summer had a higher share of audience than 
original runs in either winter or summer. 



2. Is there a big audience loss when some people realize a show is a rerun? 

SOURCE: See question I. 

Ai-erage rerun loses less audienee than summer first run shows 



SHOWS WHICH HAVE FILM RERUNS 



WINTER: ', of audience 

ot original run of film show 

which stays tuned* 


SUMMER: ', of audience 

of reruns of same shows 

n hlch stays t lined ' 


High Show: 97% 
Low Show: 75% 
AVERACE ALL: 90% 


High Show: 96% 
Low Show: 77% 
AVERACE ALL: 89% 



A further Nielsen study showed that more viewers stay tuned in to 
a film rerun after they realize that it's a rerun than stay tuned in for 
the control group of first-run summer replacement shows. The average 



CONTROL CROUP WITH NO RERUNS (/or eompariton) 



WINTER: ', of audience 


SUMMER: ', of 


audience 


of control group which 


nt' i eplacemenl shows which 


stays tuned 


stays tuned 




High Show: 95% 


High Show: 


95% 


Low Show: 83% 


Low Show: 


83% 


AVERACE ALL: 90% 


AVERACE ALL: 


88% 



of all rerun films tested commanded 89% of the audience, which 
stayed tuned in for 25 out of 30 minutes. The average replacement 
show from control group kept 88% °f viewers for that time. 



FILM BASICS we 3 



3. Will viewers watch a rerun film show they've seen before? 



SOURCE: See Question 



% OF RERUN SHOW AUDIENCE WHO HAD SEEN THE EPISODE BEFORE 41% 

% FIGURE ABOVE IS OF AUDIENCE WHICH WATCHED THE FIRST RUN 34% 



Just as millions of Americans will go to a movie or a play more 
than once so millions of televiewers will dial the repeat episodes 
of a tv program they've enjoyed. As the Nielsen study of rerun 
programs indicates, an average of 41% of those homes tuned to a 
repeat film show have seen the show before . . . but watched it again. 



This figure compares favorably with the size of the original audi- 
ence tuned to the first-run of the program. An average of 34% of 
the viewers in the original audience, according to Nielsen, return 
to watch the repeat showings. Concluded Nielsen: "Use of repeat 
film shows does not significantly affect audience levels in tv." 



4. How many episodes in a season's film cycle are not seen by viewers? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen and CBS TV Film Syndication 



Nearly 90% of audience sees less than 50% of shows 



PERCENT OF 
VIEWING HOMES 


NO. EPISODES 
VIEWED 


AV. NO. EPISODES 
PER HOME 


2% 


16-21 


16.2 


10% 


11-15 


12.5 


24% 


6-10 


7.7 


64% 


1-5 


2.2 



In a special study of a 21-week film cycle, A. C. Nielsen learned 
that only a handful of viewers — 2% — saw more than 16 episodes 
in the program series. On the other hand, most viewers missed 
a large number of episodes. Some 24% of the audience saw an aver- 
age of less than eight programs; some 64% saw fewer than three 
shows. The point: the first-run of a show, apart from all consid- 
eration of tv's steady growth in both markets and tv homes, does 
not exhaust a program's opportunity. And, as the chart above 
shows, even if they have seen a film show before when its being 
shown in rerun the chances are good that the viewers will stay. 



5. What's the judgment of station programing men about reruns? 

SOURCE: ABC Film Syndication Inc. survey of 80 tv stations, first quarter 1954 



STATIONS CARRYING 1-5 RERUNS 75% 

STATIONS CARRYING 5-10 RERUNS 9% 

STATIONS CARRYING NO RERUNS 16% 



Majority of stations carry rerun film series 

More than eight out of every 10 U.S. television outlets, including 
those in the largest and oldest markets, carry one or more rerun film 
shows. Reason: From the station's viewpoint, they often pull as well 
as, and sometimes surpass, the program's original tv rating. 



6. What else helps to account for the large rerun audience? 



SOURCE: NBC TV Research Department 



91% growth of tv in past two years means big rerun potential 



1952 month-by-month tv set growth 

Jan. 15,777,000 July 17,832,200 

Feb. „ .16,129,300 Aug. 18,354,300 

Mar. 16,535,100 Sep. .18,711,800 

Apr. 16,939,100 Oct. .19,124,900 

May .17,290,800 Nov. 19,751,200 

June 17,627,300 Dec. 20,439,400 



1953 month-by-month tv set growth 

Jan. 21,234,100 July .24,519,000 

Feb. - 21,955,100 Aug. .24,895,000 

Mar. 22,551,500 Sep. 25,233,000 

Apr. 23,256,000 Oct. 25,690,000 

May 23,930,000 Nov. 26,364,000 

June 24,292,600 Dec. ... 26,973,000 



1954 set growth 



Jan. 


27,812,000 


Feb. 


28,500,000 


Mar. 


29,125,000 


Apr. 


29,495,000 


May 


30,083,000 



', ', ',.. !?: w n ■> : :'. ■> 



page 4 



Ill Availability of time for film 

1. How much local "film time 7 ' is left outside of network program hours? 

SOURCE: SPONSOR survey of four major tv networks June 1954 

KluvU portions of burs bvloiv intlivuiv "twtwork option" p<>rio</.v 




Option linn* caries with network: As special chart above 
shows, there are some Important variations between the major net- 
works as to what time slots are, and what are not, assigned as "Net- 
work Option Time" in station contracts. All four networks schedule 
the 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. period (local times) for network shows. 
Pattern in Midwest is the same, one hour earlier. But daytime pat- 
terns differ. NBC TV's and CBS TV's are roughly similar; ABC TV 
and Du Mont are identical but NBC TV varies notably with ABC's 
network pattern as does CBS TV with Du Mont. 

In general, national spot and local advertisers seeking to buy or 
place syndicated film shows on affiliates must look first to the non- 
network time periods as indicatad above, particularly in the largest 
multi-station markets or in markets where the leading networks are 
represented with owned-and-operated stations. 

But there are exceptions. Networks have lately been seeking to 
clear the 10:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. (or later) slots for network pro- 
grams Stch network shows as "Studio On"," "See It Now" and 



"What's My Line" on CBS TV; "Greatest Fights," and "Private Secre- 
tary" on NBC TV; and "Name's the Same" and "Place the Face" on 
ABC TV will be aired this fall in what is technically "Station Time." 

At the same time, network affiliates (but not O&O outlets) in a 
number of large markets served by two or three outlets have not 
hesitated on occasion to "bump" network scheduling in Class A time 
to place an attractive spot film series. One national tv advertiser, 
for example, has spotted a mystery series in "network" time in such 
markets as: Charlotte (9:00 p.m., Sunday); Minneapolis (8:30 p.m., 
Monday) and Atlanta (8:30 p.m., Wednesday). 

As one tv rep observed: "Apart from the O&O outlets, stations be- 
come very cooperative when you start to discuss a firm 52-week film 
contract. Spot tv means more money in their pocket." 

Network hours shown in chart above are "live" for the East and 
Midwest in almost all cases, are via kinescope in the Rockies and 
Pacific markets in the same local time slots as in New York. Very 
few shows are aired on a live basis from one coast to the other. 



1MB 



pin 








Sheldon Reynolds' 



Production of 





■It LOCK 
HOLMKS 

...Starring Ronald Howard as Sherlock! 



The greatest detective of all time comes to TV 

... on /lira. Here is a series that is backed 
with one of the most extensive presold 
audiences in TV history. For almost 70 years 
the adventures of SHERLOCK HOLMES 
and his friend Dr. Watson haoe been thrilling 
audiences in the great Arthur Conan Doyle books! 
In the movies.. . on the stage . . . and in daily and Sunday newspapers 
...the magic name of SHERLOCK HOLMES always has meant 
box office! And noiv — as a TV film shoiv produced by 
Sheldon Reynolds, creator of "Foreign Intrigue", and starring 
Ronald Hoivard, brilliant young English actor- 
the potential is even greater! 

SHERLOCK HOLMES (39 half-hour programs, custom 
filmed for TV) is ready for September airing. 

SHERLOCK HOLMES, filmed in Europe, is a natural for local, 
regional and national spot advertisers! 

For A Sure Clue To Increased Business write, wire or 
phone your nearest MPTV Film Syndication Division : 




H. Marion Crawford 
as Watson 



NEW YORK 

655 Madison Ave. 
New York 21, N.Y. 
TEmpleton 8-2000 

BOSTON 

216 Tremont St. 
Boston 16, Mass. 
HAncock 60897 

ATLANTA 

Mortgage Guaranty Bldg. 
Carnegie Way & Ellis St. 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Alpine 0912 



CHICAGO 

155 E. Ohio St. 
Chicago 11, III. 
WHitehall 3-2600 

DETROIT 

2211 Woodward Ave. 
Detroit 1, Michigan 
Woodward 1-2560 

TORONTO 

MPTV (Canada! Ltd. 
277 Victoria St. 
Toronto, Canada 
Empire 8-8621 



LOS ANGELES 

9100 Sunset Blvd. 
Los Angeles 46, Calif. 
Crestview 1-6101 

SAN FRANCISCO 

625 Market St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Douglas 2-1387 

DALLAS 

3109 Routh St. 
Dallas 4, Texas 
STerling 4007 



These MPTV shows are available now: 

y& Hour Shows: Duffy's Tavern • Flash Gordon • Janet Dean, 
Registered Nurse • Sherlock Holmes 

*/4 Hour Shows: Drew Pearson's Washington-Merry-Go-Round 
Junior Science • Tim McCoy • • • plus more to come 

Dramatic Serial 5 quarter hr*. a week • The Heart of Juliet Jones 




SYNDICATION CORP. 



12 JULY 1954 



191 



1 1 Tips on buying fitwn 






1 Financial guarantees: When buying :i brand new 
syndicated Sim series, particularly in a multi-market 
deal, always check the producer's (or tin- syndicator 
- financial responsibility. Producing tv film 
series today sometimes involves a long wail on the part 
..I the producer for a return on his initial investment. 
It's n. .1 at all impossible (or a producer, even a good one, 
tn be caughl shori on money, in which case he mas ""' he 
able t<i deliver the remainder of the scries. Some clients today 
even require the producer to post big bonds before signing. 



f\ Titnt- but/in*;: Clients who are considering multi- 
B™ market tilm deals on the scale of Canada Drj 's sponaor- 
m\ ulii |> of Annie Oakley on a national basis, or regional 

deals like Pure Oil's sponsorship of Racket Squad, 
\J should be careful in scheduling the starting dates 

nf tin ii film campaigns. Season: The usual num- 
ber of prints supplied for even a "national'' tv film deal 
perhaps 50 markets) without extra charge to the client 
is around a dozen. These are shuttled between stations on a 
"bicycling" basis. Day and date starts mean costly extra prints. 



/~K ifuulUfl Control: Pilot films aren't always a good 
• I gauge of of what a series will be like. If a series is 

W not completed when it is offered to you, you will have 
/ I to rely on the reputation of the producer or the syndi- 
■■ cator. Look at representative samples of his other series. 
Don't take chances, either; they can prove to be very 
costly, [ndependent producers, and most Byndicators who also 
produce shows, are financed by banks who charge full rates 
of interest, and who have the producer in a comer. Therefore, 
the average producer isn't likely to offer cancellation clauses. 



71 < u'll protections: Just as the financial responsi- 
bility of a producer and/or syndicator should be investi- 
gated before signing up for an important film program 
deal, so should the question of legal protection be ex- 
plored, veteran film buyers warn. There is, for example, 
the question of who, exactly, is responsible for the film 
dining its various stages of travel i agency, client, producer, 

syndicator, shipper, station). Also, clients should cheek on 
the protection they are of!', red against crank lawsuits, morals 
questions with talent, retroactive union increasi 9, and so forth. 



Distribution: Video clients should always check a 

syndicator 's distribution facilities. Are the tv film prints 

carefully inspected? Are they cleaned and repaired? 

Does the syndicator have a reputation for delivering 

prints to stations in time for play dates? Does he carry 

insurance on the films while they are in his possession? 

so on. Reason: The handling of tv films can become a 

problem. Big syndicators, like Ziv Tv, NBC, CBS, Official, 

and others have to handle as many as 1,200 prints per 

('lients who want commercials cut in should check cost. 



8 Research: The same warnings that apply to the pur- 
chase of live shows on the basis of broadcast research 
apply to the buying of tv films, particularly reruns. 
Ratings may be cited as being "typical." These should 
be checked, if they are being used as a strong factor in 
show purchase. The ratings may be old and made back 
in the days when the show had Only minimum competition. 
Or they may have been made in one station markets, in which 
cast thej do not reflect the ability of the show to attract 
audience in multiple station markets. Ratings are only a guide. 



4 Reruns of tv films: Today, reruns are so well ac- 
cepted by clients and audiences alike that there is little 
of the original stigma ("They'll never get an audi- 
ence") surrounding them. However, there are price 
differentials between first and subsequent runs on nearly 
all film packages in syndication, with the price dropping 
anywhere from in to 40%, depending on time slot, original 
rating, number nf sets and stations in the market, and such 
like. It's wise for a client to (heck carefully on whether a show- 
is really a first run package, if it is offered for sale as such. 



91 xclusivity: New tv stations have appeared with 
great regularity across the face of the U. S. in the past 
few months. Many of these new tv markets overlap with 
old ones. Therefore, a sponsor who is buying a syndicated 
film series should be careful that the same program will 
not be seen in a serious overlap with his campaign. It's 
possible today for a sponsor to buy a show as " first run ' ' 
in a new tv market only to find that the •' second run " 
showing — -perhaps by a leading business competitor— is being 
seen by a sizable percentage of exactly the same audience. 



I Mervhundising: Nearly all of the syndicators con- 

-~ tailed by sponsor in its survey of the made for-tv film 

■ industry offer varying degrees of merchandising assis- 

|l tancr. The fanciest variety is offered by the top syndJ 

\_J CatOrS like Zi\ Tv, and by the syndication offshoots of 

the major tv networks. However, other syndicators and 

producers have developed some audience attracting publicity gim 

micks, which can range all the way from the franchised merchan- 
dise deals made with slums like Ramar of tin JungU and 
Flash Gordon to personal appearances of stars [Liberace). 



M £^ Station contracts: Although the number of 

III multiple affiliate stations is dropping in the big tv 

markets, it's still wise to check on preemptions and 

''misses" in time contracts. Reason: Certain spe- 

J_ \J eial tv programs, like Presidential speeches, major 

news and sports events, and suchlike can "bump'' 

a Locally slotted film advertiser out of his usual time. Un- 
less the time contract with tin station spells out dearly that 
the advertiser will get a "make-good" in his regular time slot 
sponsor may get one which does not reach the right audience. 



RF.i*RiyTS OF FMIA1 RASICS are available on request. Special price for qu an t ity orders 



M 



D •/■■ 



I P 



page 6 




fil 



star-studded feature 



for TV. . 




so new 



12 are still reserved for 



Motion Picture Theaters! 




Right now, you can sign for the rights to the showing in your 
market of every one of the 30 recent, major studio feature 
films never befcre seen on TV which make up the 
General Teleradio "First with the Finest" film franchise. 



It won't delay your scheduling a single day 

but twelve of these films are so recent that they are 

being held by the flm distributors for 

motion picture showing until the dates listed. 



You can't blame them when you consider that $45,000,000 
was spent to produce the 30 films in the first place. 

Don't you be left waiting in line in your market. 

Act now/ Call... New York-LO 4-8000 ■ 1440 Broadway 
Chicago — WH 4-5060 • Tribune Tower 
Los Angeles-HO 2-2133 • 1313 No. Vine St 





ARCH OF TRIUMPH (now available) 

BODY AND SOUL (available 8/10 54) 

CASBAH (now available) 

CAUGHT (now available) 

COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO 
(now available) 

THE DARK MIRROR (now available) 

DOUBLE LIFE (now available) 

FABULOUS DORSEYS (available 11/13 54) 

FORCE OF EVIL (now available) 

FOUR FACES WEST (available 8/10 54) 

LET'S LIVE A LITTLE (available 12/7 54) 

LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN 

(now available) 

LOST MOMENT (now available) 

LULU BELLE (available 9/7/54) 

MACBETH (now available) 

MAGIC TOWN (now available) 

MAGNIFICENT DOLL 
fc (now available) 

MIRACLE OF THE BELLS 
(now available) 

MR. PEABODY AND 
THE MERMAID (now available) 

NO MINOR VICES (now available) 

NORTHWEST STAMPEDE 
(available 8 25 54) 

ONE TOUCH OF VENUS 
(now available) 

THE OTHER LOVE 

(available 10 13 54) 

PRIVATE AFFAIRS OF BEL AMI 
(available 10, 16 54) 

RAMROD (available 8 25 54) 

RUTHLESS (available 9 12 54) 

THE SCAR (available 12/6 54) 

SECRET BEYOND THE DOOR 
(now available) 

THE SENATOR WAS INDISCREET 
(now available) 

SO THIS IS NEW YORK 
(available 12 13/54} 



********* ******* 

Take a quick look at- 

LUBBOCK TEXAS 

HUB OF THE SOUTH PLAINS 

***** ********* 

LUDDUuII lAHO Largest Metropolitan Area 

* between: 

„ DALLAS, FT. WORTH AND ALBUQUERQUE 650 MILES 

SAN ANTONIO AND DENVER 961 MILES 

* OKLAHOMA CITY AND EL PASO 725 MILES 

WICHITA FALLS AND EL PASO 556 MILES 

LUDDUvll Retail Trading Area comprises: 

* 26 Counties Population 396,829 

* LUDDUvll Metropolitan Area: 

Population 108,678 



County is THIRD in Cotton Production 
in America 

is FIRST in Cotton Seed Oil Refining in 
America 



LUBBOCK 
LUBBOCK 

LUDDUIsIA County is THIRD in: 

Per Family Spendable Income $5,237.00 * 

LUDdULK is the Home of "TEXAS TECH": * 

The College has an annual payroll of $3,000,000 

NATIONAL REPS — THE KATZ AGENCY 

KYC. The Strongest Voice of the 
South Plains-5000 W.D. 1000 W.N. 

CBS — The only Class A Radio Network Service in West Texas 

KFYO— Covers 36 Counties— Pop. 542,300— Radio Homes 144.130 * 



KFYO 790 



* 



******* ********** 

94 SPONSOR 



EE5» SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 





FROM MORNINGS TO AFTER-MIDNIGHT, BUSINESS IS GOOD 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

(J. What \v the timebuyer's outlook in fall availabilities? page 196 

|| B What are the important sales trends in spot radio? page 197 

%|. Are new yardsticks being used in fall spot buying? page 200 

i|. What role will transcription firms play this fall? page 210 

||. How well does spot radio reach the U.S. farm market? page 218 

l|» What developments are there in classical, folk music? page 220 

l|. How have after-midnight spot radio shows been doing? page 221 

||. What's the outlook in foreign-language programing? page 221 

|| a Fm radio: Is ""hi-fi" proving a shot in the arm? P«ge 223 

12 JULY 1954 195 



Availabilities 

Q. From the timebuyer's view- 
point, what's the general outlook 
for spot radio time availabilities? 
A. The fall L954 outlook resembles 
thai "I last year, although a number 
ol trends in motion then have become 
more pronounced: 

1. Mornings: The Monday-through- 
In, lav 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. day- 
segment is -till the most sought after. 
Result: Man) stations sell morning 
time "iil\ «.ii a waiting li-t or rotating 
basis, with the biggest control center- 
ing on "personality" shows in the 7:00 
a.m. to 8:00 a.m. breakfasl hour. This 
squeeze i- getting tighter, too. ln- 
creased emphasis on the out-of-home 
radio audience has heightened com- 
petition for prime morning time since 
these sales tactics have brought to ra- 
dio mam advertisers who want to 



reach motorists on their waj to work. 
Between 9:00 a.m. and noon «,n week- 
days there are more availabilities. 
Weekends, too, have more open morn- 
ing time, often at special weekend 
discounts. 

2. Afternoons: Since main adver- 
tisers who want to reach liotli men and 
women d<> not feature- strongl) in the 
purchase ol afternoon slots, there are 
more Blots available in afternoon time 
than in the peak morning hours. How- 
ever, tins situation ma\ tighten con- 
siderabl) b) the end of summer. Al- 
read) a number of top advertisers — 
including General Foods' Jello and 
Minute Tapioca. Clapp's Baby Food. 
Nescafe, Bluebonnet Margarine, Nu- 
coa, Chase ^ Sanborn and such cig- 
arette advertisers as Camel. Lu< k\ 
Strike. IAM and \ icero\ liave start- 
ed to place extensive afternoon spot 
radio schedules. Consensus of reps: 



Hot- in women's participation pro- 
grams and afternoon d.j. sessions that 
-how strong rating histories will be a 
good l»u\ for fall, particularly since 
the radio -et -alt-- trend I See Radio 
Basics page 00) is in the direction of 
small "extra" Bets and clock radio-. 

3. Evenings, nighttime: Advertiser 
interest in early-evening radio time — 
particular!) new- strips has been ris- 
ing lately. \- Street & Finnej time- 
buyer Helen Thomas told sponsor 
recentl) : "Earl) morning has become 
BO popular and so jammed with com- 
mercials that I've stronglj recommend- 
ed the 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. time 
-lot-, particularly at the da\time rates 
on some stations. During these times 
we get the same mixed audience as 
mornings." As in afternoon radio, the 
outlook — at the moment — for picking 
up availabilities i- pretty good but it 
i- likeb to tighten up b\ fall. 







196 



SPONSOR 






Spot radio availabilities during the 
prime tv hours of 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 
p.m.. as evcrv timebuyer knows, are 
the easiest of all to buy. But, as more 
and more stations group them into at- 
tractive saturation packages and as re- 
search shows the still-powerful effects 
of nighttime spot radio, this situation, 
too, is changing. "Nighttime spot ra- 
dio may be the 'sleeper' in fall air 
advertising," is how a Cunningham & 
Walsh media buyer termed it. Already, 
according to reps, there are signs that 
nighttime slots — particularly of the 
music-and-news nature — are disappear- 
ing from the easy-to-buy list. Auto 
advertisers and auto dealers, particu- 
larly Ford and Lincoln-Mercury, have 
been snapping up 10:00 p.m. and 
11:00 p.m. news shows. 

After-midnight popular music shows 
are as popular I and as untouched by 
tv) as ever. Classical music shows 
beamed at music lovers and the hi-fi 
fraternity in the post-midnight hours 
— a trend that started last fall — are 
continuing, and timebuyers may expect 
to see a number of such offerings, par- 
ticularly from am-fm outlets. 



Sales trends 



Q. What new trends are appar- 
ent in spot radio selling? 

A. As outlined above, the basic situ- 
ation in what time segments are most 
available hasn't changed. But there's 
been a sizable shift in spot radio sell- 
ing which affects the buyer. Here are 
some of the most important sales 
developments: 

1. Service packages: This fall, more 
than half of the stations in the coun- 
try — according to the guesstimate of 
sales executives of several leading rep 
firms — will feature some kind of ser- 
vice packages. These will range in 
size (and price) from occasional traf- 
fic bulletins at peak commuting hours 
to full-scale combinations of traffic, 
weather, school, travel service, shop- 
ping and homemaking announcements 
throughout the day. 

Particular stress will be placed on 
weekend radio service packages (see 
"Weekend radio: are you missing a 
good bet?" Parts I and II, SPONSOR 
14 and 28 June ) . Reason, as voiced 
by one station sales executive: "Tv 
will never be able to compete with ra- 
dio in this form of programing. And 




Station Reps Assn. clinics further buyer-seller umlerstuniting 

SRA brings together groups of station reps and admen to discuss spot radio. Pictures above 
show several of these meetings. Top (standing, I. to r.) R. Rollinson, director of advertiser 
relations, SRA; F. Mitchell, G. Milliken, FCB; T. Campbell, Branham Co.; J. Marsicano, W. 
Ensign, P. Gerhold, FCB; J. Francis, Free & Peters; E. Fillion, Meeker; B. Morrison, Free & 
Peters; W. Reed, Biair; G. Blake, FCB; (seated, I. to r.) A. Pardoll, W. Bambrick, A. Lowitz, 
A. Weil, H. Frier, H. Holt, D. Kaplan all from FCB. Second: (standing I. to r.) C. Fredericks, 
Biow; R. Rollinson, SRA; H. Shook, PM; P. Leary, PM; (seated I. to r.) D. Deutsch, PM; T. 
Christensen, PM; J. Tormey, Avery-Knodel; R. Milhiser, PM. Third: (standing I. to r.) R. Rol- 
linson, SRA; T. Campbell, Branham Co.; J. Thompson, Free & Peters; J. Turck, Weed; R. Fenner, 
Vick; F. Fitzpatrick, Katz; A. McCoy, Avery-Knodel; D. R. Moore, Vick; B. Goodel, Meeker; 
(seated I. to r.) T. F. Flanagan, SRA; M. Bassett, Blair; T. Poole, R. Davies, C. Carter, E. Gel- 
lert, all of Vick. Bottom: (standing I. to r.) R. Rollinson, SRA; A. McCoy, Avery-Knodel; M. 
Kellner, Katz; R. Gurkin; Blair; J. Carter, Adam Young; M. Turner, B&B; J. Scovern, Free & 
Peters; (seated I. to r.) G. Beaumont, P. Podgus, C. Jones, M. Becker, E. Murtfeldt, all of B&B. 



12 JULY 1954 



197 



THE FACTS ABOUT THE RATING SERVICES: CI 



NAME 



1 



RADIO TECHNIQUE AREA 

OR TV 



American Re- 
search Bureau 

' Washington) 



Jiary 



Natl 4 



LOCAL 
MARKET 



60 Reg 



PROJECT- 
ABLE NA- 
TIONALLY 



SAMPLE BASE 



SAMPLE 
TABULATED 



INTER- 

VIEW 

PERIOD 



2,200 diaries natl; 500- 
550 per city 



DELI 

0) 



1700-1800- Normally 
natl. 325 city 1st 7 days 2- 
(averages) of month 



2 



Hooper 

(New York) 



Tv-diary, ; ' 
R-duplex- 
Both phone Local 

coinci- 
dental 



Tv-55 
R-90 



15,400 coincidental, 
700-900 diaries; 
No R-900 phone calls up 

per '/4-hr program in 
period 



'/.-hr 
2 wk 



Tv-12.350 co- 
incidental; 
300-400 dia- 
ries. R - typi- 
cally 900 per 
74 program 
in 2-wk period 



Tv-lst wk, 
R-varies 



Tv- 

ply 



3 



Nielsen 

(Chicago) 



Both 



Meter 



Natl, 
multi-city, 



Tv-N.Y. 
R-5 1 



R- 1 200 metered homes .«<,/ 

T Approx l0/ o 

per minute; lv-over 

800 meters 



less 



Contin- 
uous 1 ' 



4. 



Pulse 

(New York) 



Both 



Roster 

recall 

(personal 

interview) 



Natl, 
local 



Tv-100 
R-100 



Yes 



R-400 interviews y^ hr 
wkly program; 1000 
for 15-min 5-day wkly 
show; Tv-200-400 for 
Vl hr wkly, 1000 for 
15-min 5-day wk show 



Same as sar 
pie base 



1st 7 days 
of mo 



5. 



Trendex 

(New York) 



Both 



Phone 


Tv-multi 


coinci- 
dental 


city 
R-local 



Tv-10 
R-45 



No 



Tv-700 calls per '/ 2 hr 
show; R-300 per re- 
porting period ( 74 hrs 
8 am-8 pm) 



Tv-600 
R-300 



Tv-lst 7 

days of 

mo, R-last 

3 wks of 



6 



Videodex 

(Chicago & New York) 



Tv 



Jairy 



Natl, 
multi- 
city, local 



70 3 



Yes 



a c°/ 9 200 "«♦'. 200 . . , , 

Approx 5 /„ greater , nn . 1st 7 days 

,1 l x l 1 1 j to 600 local t 

than number tabulated . ot mo 
guaranteed 



FOOTNOTES: 1ARB publishes 2 national reports monthly. 15 city reports monthly, 11 tor programs not covered tirst week. .'Hooper uses telephone coincide! 

city reports quarterly. II city reports 3 times yearly, 23 city reports twice yearly. Had diary in all 55 tv cities as check: correction factor is then applied to each 

increased from 35 markets covered most 1953. -ARB National Supplement, based on ered. 4Nielsen has radio reports for New York, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh. Chi 

separate sample about '3 size of regular sample, covers second 7 days of each month Angeles plus separate Pacific Time Zone Report. "'Videodex publishes 21 ■ 



the radio audience for 'service' pro- 
graming is constant!) growing." 

2. Saturday tie-in: The race for 
choice Monday-through-Frida) morn- 
Lng radio slots has prompted a num- 
ber of reps and stations to seek new 
ways in gel more advertisers into more 
morning time. One ua\ is the Satur- 
il.i\ tie-in. 

In its mi. -1 ' ■ .iNNK.N form, it works 
like this: 

Regular Monday - through - Friday 

ning programing, with the • ooper- 

ation nl the stations con< erned, is 
9treb li'-il to include Saturday as well, 
thus putting programing on a six-da) 
in-trad nf five-daj basis. \n< 1. .1 six- 
da) rate 1- figured, based on existing 



prices and the latest Saturday rating 
picture. 

For an advertiser who buys on the 
full six-da\ basis, it means a hike in 
rates of 10 to 20$ although that is 
balanced by the fact that he reaches 
a larger audience more often. In some 
cases, the Saturda) tie-in has been 
arranged on a rotating schedule so 
that advertisers are on the slate for 
a Monday-Wednesday-Friday slotting 
one week, Tuesday-Thursday-Saturda) 
tin* next. Rates in this case amount to 
about half the six-da) rate. 

3. Rotating schedules: Mam radio 
stations are allocating prime morning 
time "N a rotation basis to spot radio 
advertisers. Perhaps one out of five 



I . S. stations have ''gone on alloca- 
tion." 

One form of the rotating schedule 
is outlined above, involving three-da) 
scheduling in a six-day period that in- 
cludes Saturda) -. 

But the most common version is a 
rotating schedule built around premi- 
um-priced morning radio time, which 
work- like tlii-: 

Because of its large famil) listening, 
a premium price is charged for the 
7:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. period. How- 
ever, if an advertiser is willing to take 
a rotating spot schedule between 6:00 
a.m. and O;00 a.m. 1 landing in the 
premium-priced slot ever) third da) * 
he ]>a\- the regular morning rate with 



198 



SPONSOR 



d SAVE THIS CHART FOR READY REFERENCE M^ssi" ""*-'" 1 



$900 
I Rptr, 
Jjo for 
it pack- 
as 



SUBSCRIBERS 



BASIC DATA SUPPLIED 



'/4-hr ratings, sets in use, total 

287 agencies, audience, audience composition, 

advertisers, viewers per set; also sponsor, 

stations plus number cities carrying telecast for 

networks, misc natl rprt, cum ratings daytime, 

others pblshd on request 



LIMITATIONS 



Undependability of diary keeper. Re- 
turns may not be representative. Limited 
to week's viewing per month. Keeping 
diary short period could inflate viewing. 
Some family members may be missed. 
Can't measure chainbreaks. 



ADVANTAGES 



Diary inexpensive. Measures conscious 
viewing. Covers complete broadcast day, 
Also station area. Same data may be 
used in local, national reports. Yields 
data on short periods, audience compo- 
sition, flow of audience cumulation. 



itns- 

1- ,200 

"ort; 

es- 
i-',500 
p nth 



378 advertis- 
ers, agencies, 
stations, net- 
works, misc 



Both R & Tv: ratings, share of au- 
dience ,sets in use; Tv only: au- 
dience composition, cumulative 
audience, weekly averages, uhf 
penetration 



Phone doesn't cover non-phone homes, 
rural areas, early or late listening or 
viewing or out-of-home. Misses unknown 
amount extra-set listening. Diary has 
same weaknesses as ARB. Diary-phone 
combination questioned. 



Phone: Can produce quick results. No 
memory loss increases accuracy of rat- 
ings. Flexibility in market selection. Can 
yield audience composition. Use of diary- 
phone together largely corrects weak- 
ness of either used alone. 



Both R & Tv; l/4-hr Nielsen Rat- 
185 agencies, ings, homes reached, average au- 
to advertisers, dience, share, total audience, 
§j yr all 8 networks, cum audience, min-by-min audi- 
others ence, cost per homes, much other 
analytical data 



Measures tuning only, not people. As 
result can't determine audience compo- 
sition. Amount extra-set listening mea- 
sured debatable. Expensive. Set break- 
downs can affect sample. 



Mechanical. Reduces human factor to 
minimum (placing meter, mailing tape). 
Measures 24-hr daily minute-by-minute 
tuning; this provides wealth of data not 
obtainable otherwise. Fixed panel better 
for trend data. 



)00 

h ;ies- 
mo" 



400 stations, Both R & Tv: ^-hr ratings, view- 

100 agencies, ers per set, audience composition, 

advertisers, share of audience, sets in use, 
all networks number cities carrying show 



Interview technique can be inflationary 
because of memory failure, confusion 
factor. Technique expensive, especially 
rural areas. Some family members may 
be missed. Misses those not at home 
when calls made. 



Yields 'round-clock data, also for short 
time periods, audience flow. Sample can 
be rigidly controlled. Questions can be 
added or changed to obtain new data. 
Can combine with market, product sur- 
veys of all kinds. 



5 >er 
tr per 

r x: 
5( 



77 agencies, 
advertisers, 
stations, net- 
works, misc. 



'/4-hr daytime, '/2- nr evening rat- 
ings, sets in use, average audience 
by minute, audience composition, 
indexes 3 times yrly, sponsor iden- 
tification 3 times yrly 



Phone coincidental doesn't reach non- 
phone homes, rural areas, early or late 
listening or viewing or out-of-home. 
Misses unknown amount extra-set listen- 
ing. Radio report limited to 8 a.m. -8 
p.m. weekdays. 



Very fast. Does not ask respondent 
about radio and tv at same time. This 
tends to give more valid radio ratings. 
Only service giving network popularity 
reports. Other advantages similar to 
Hooper above. 



$'0 



150 advertis- 
ers, agencies, 
media, others 



'/}-hr ratings, sets in use, audience 
share, average viewers per set by 
time period and by program, 
number of homes reached, num- 
ber cities carrying show, sponsors 



Limitations much like ARB above. Ro- 
tating panel used (same homes kept 7 
months, I /7th changing each month). 
Is 7 months too long for accurate diary 
keeping? Additionally diary returns may 
not be representative. 



Rotating panel enables Videodex to dis- 
card first week's diary as "inflationary, 
otherwise atypical." Claims it can build 
more representative sample over long 
period, get more accurate trend data, 
than one-shot approach. 



uarterly. GNielsen National Radio reports issued biweekly, cover tirst and by wire in 12 hours on any one program. HVideodex price to agencies, advertisers and 

I ot month (1 each), National Tv reports issued biweekly, cover 2 consecu- media for basic service (network, multi-city and local reports!; additional markets 

■ each month. 7Pulse package includes all radio and tv market reports plus available at marginal cost. KiNielsen is launching new local radio and tv measurement 

l,network report plus twice yearly radio network report. STrendex can report service in October in 3 markets; 3 markets to be added a month till 50 are covered. 



no added premium. 

These plans, and similar variations, 
are designed to accomplish a double 
purpose: (a) to fit more advertisers 
into morning radio, and (b) to pro- 
vide an inducement to advertisers to 
buv time outside the peak morning 
hours. 

This fall, if an advertiser or time- 
buyer does not want to go into a ro- 
tating morning schedule he will often 
face premium prices and very tight 
availabilities in prime morning time. 

4. Out-of-home listening: This sum- 
mer, the amount of radio programing 
and follow-through promotion aimed 
at out-of-home radio listeners will hit 
an all-time peak. And sponsors — in- 



cluding such advertisers as Lincoln- 
Mercury, Rayco Seat Covers, Philip 
Morris, Armstrong Tire & Rubber. 
Buick, Admiral. RCA and others — 
have been buying many time slots to 
reach out-of-home dialers. 

There's every likelihood, according 
to reps and station executives, that 
this trend will continue. 

Typical recent buy: Sun Oil Co.. a 
veteran radio advertiser, recently 
signed for a series of "holiday week- 
end" announcement saturation pack- 
ages to carry through the summer and 
into the fall. Sun Oil will lay down a 
barrage of announcements from the 
eve of the holiday (4 July, Labor Day 
and others) right through the morning 



of the first work day that follows, 
using most of key Eastern markets. 
Target: the motoring audience. 

Several timebuyers told sponsor 
that reps and stations were making 
more and more sales pitches in which 
a program rating was actually the 
combination of in-home and out-of- 
home ratings. 

This varied all the way from the 
policy of John Blair Co. (combine all 
Pulse in-home and outside-the-home 
radio ratings wherever available) to 
NBC Spot Sales, which combines in- 
and out-of-home ratings occasionally 
in special presentations to auto, gaso- 
line, appliance and suntan oil manu- 
facturers. 



I 



12 JULY 1954 



199 



MEMO from D EE RIVERS — 

™ All time-buyers 

Please <<ill 

Bernic Howard 
Stat - National 
/mi Madison /• 
Plaza S-0555 
so that he < an 
tell YOU-ALL what 

WEAS 

and its new 

50,000 watt 
\\'< stinghouse transmitter 
mi its same old frequent ) 

1010 

with its same old 
non directional antenna 

is going to do in 

GEORGIA 

on 
AUGUST 1, 1954 



HOOPER Tells the KC 
Story! 




SOON 




KUDL A 

^&Mef»KDKD 
\ 



O* tOm THI flltT TIUI 
OMI TO*H CO*I*AGI #0» 
GUAM* »«K\»i CITY 



Look at these figures 
une 54 HOOPER 
:00 AM-12 N 

The picture has 

changed! 

Net A — 25.8 

nd A — 16.0 

I Ncgrol 

KUDL — 13.4 

Net D — 10.8 

Net C — 9.8 

Ind B — 8.8 

Net D — 7.2 

Let your nearest FORJOE 
office show you the new 
June, '54, C. E. HOOPER 

DENVER, TOO!! 



CLINTON 



Said K&E timebuyer Larr) Donino: 

"In < ities like Loa Vngeles, Detroil 
and Washington ju-i to name three 

the out-of-home Factor, when mea- 
Bured, adda great!) to your abilitj to 
ei aluate i adio l>u\-. In \\ ashington, 
foi instance, office closing hours are 
ered to avoid traffic jams. 'I here's 
a \<w Bizable out-of-home car audi- 
right through the supper period 
which «an be reached b) evening 
radio. 

."). Saturation plans: Because of ra- 
dio's huge base circulation, a satura- 
tion spot drive hits an enormous 
cumulate e audience at low cost. I bus 
stations and reps have been devoting 
increasing attention to the "-atura- 
tion" technique. 

Rep predictions are bullish as re- 
gards saturation spol campaigns. As 
Dan Denenholz. research and promo- 
tion manager of the Katz Vgency rep 
firm told SPONSOR: 

"You can expect an increase in the 
number and variety of saturation or 
multiple-announcement plans. More 
and more stations are establishing 
them." 

Net as well as indie stations are ex- 
treme!) active in the saturation tech- 
nique. Typical buy: A CBS Radio 
affiliate in New England has instituted 
a special "floating" series of one-min- 
ute announcements in non-network 
time. This amounts to about one an- 
nouncement per hour for nine hours 
daily, between 6:00 a.m. and midnight, 
Monday-through-Saturday. Price: $450 
net weekl) for 54 announcements. In 
other markets, network affiliates have 
taken their cue from the independent 
outlets and ha\e set up saturation 
packages that range from special Euro- 
pean travel promotions to all-day bar- 
rages of "I.D."-type announcements. 

Buyers will find that most of these 
packages have been priced at special 
discounts, simpl) because tbe\ involve 
a lot of time on a single outlet. Often 
extra discounts are available if the 
advertiser will allow a •■floating"" 
schedule and leave the actual slotting 
up I" the station's traffic department. 

To some extent, independent sta- 
tions hav< n ore flexibility- since the) 

do not have i nsider their network 

raming in setting up "block- 
buster" saturations. One independent 

OUtlel in Miami, for example, ha- -it 

aside '/// of it- Saturday and Sunday 

program periods from earb morning 

I., earl) evening, less the half-hour 



Btation break-, as day-long saturation 
packages. Vny Miami listener who 
tunes the station at an\ time during 
the da) hears commercials for the 
same advertiser, al ^2 ( i per participa- 
tion. 

Oilier independent stations have set 
up packages of weekend Bervice an- 
nouncements, weather information. 
time signals or hourb newscasts. 



Spot radio yardsticks 

Q. What new trends are appar- 
ent in agency buying of spot radio? 
A. Ibis year SPONSOB editors have 
noticed an increasing radio research 
- onsciousness among timebu\ers. The 
buyer toda) tend- to take many more 
fa<lor- into consideration than in 
past \cars. 

This isn't just extra-close interest in 
ratings or cost-per-l.OUO figures. As 
Harold I)a\i-. an Erwin, \\ ase) time- 
buyer, told SPONSOR: "Some clients 
i Please turn to putie 2n J i 




but 1 i.OOO poM- 
card entries in Bob 
Trebor's recent 
Daybreaker s Jack- 
pot convinced us! 
These 14.000 en- 
trants not only rep- 
resented all Roch- 
ester but also 122 
towns outside 
Rochester. 
BOB TREBOR 

Your product- «/<>■ 
sage will get JACKPOl results on 
Rochester's result producing morn- 
ing tbow, Hob Trebor'i Datbuakers. 

5000 WATTS 
1280 KC. 




IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



IN THI GREAT KANSAS CITY MARKET 

-K J. ; , 



SPONSOR 




YOUR PRODUCT GETS A COMPETITIVE SELLING ADVANTAGE 








WISN 



GUARANTEED 
DISPLAYS 




5*~ 



DRUG CHAIN MERCHANDISER . . . 

based on a contractual agreement with leading independent drug stores 
which do over $7,000,000 annual volume. 

This plan guarantees qualified advertisers self-service display, as pictured, on the 
special racks supplied by WISN. 

GROCERY CHAIN MERCHANDISER... 

based on a contractual agreement with A&P, National and Kohl's Food 

Stores which do over 50% of all food business in the Milwaukee Market. 

This plan guarantees qualified advertisers Mass End Displays, Jumble Displays or 

Basket Displays. 

For complete details contact Dick Shireman, Sales Manager, or one of the 

Katz Offices. 



These two in-store display 
plans are just one part of 
the many sales-producing 
merchandising services 
available through the 

WISN 

ADVERTISER 

DIVIDEND 

PLAN 



WISN 



THE MILWAUKEE ADDRESS OF 



Represented by the KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK • DETROIT • CHICAGO • KANSAS CITY • DALLAS • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 





KYW • WP1 




Saturday Hlghtz h 




From Shenandoah, Pa. to Cape May, N. J., people move back the 
rugs and a decade or so. People in their thirties. They dance again to 
the bands they knew. Glenn Miller. Dorsey. Artie Shaw. Goodman. 

Or maybe they just remember as the records spin the stories of 
every listener who danced through that wonderful era. 

It's radio station KYW's four-hour Saturday Night Dance Party. 

Folks from thirty to forty years old have themselves a ball. They've 
made this the most popular local radio show in Philadelphia. So, 
advertisers can have themselves a ball, too. Because these are the 
very people who buy household goods, food, clothes, cars and 'most 
everything else advertisers have to sell. 

But big loyal audiences like this are delivered wherever WBC 
stations send out their powerful 50,000-watt signals — Portland, Fort 
Wayne, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston. If you want to sell more 
in these markets, why don't you call the stations or Eldon Campbell, 
WBC National Sales Manager, at Plaza 1-2700, New York City? 



VESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

tftfohia; WBZ-WBZA • WBZ-TV— Boston; KOKA^Pittsburgh; WO WO— Fort Wayne; KEX— Portland, Ore. 
1 elusive National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc., 444 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 




There's more to Wisconsin 
than Milwaukee 

Cover the Dairy State with your sales 
message through the low cost medium 
of Wisconsin's most powerful radio sta- 
tion. WKOW's 53 county mail-response 
area accounts for 61% of the state's 
total income and 63% of the state's to- 
tal retail sales. Call your Headley-Reed 
man for the facts. 

WKOW-CBS 



MADISON, WIS. 

Wisconsin's most 
powerful radio station 

Represented nationally by 

Headley-Reed Co. 



. . . the Story Remains 
the Same in Danville 

WDAN is a MUST buy if you want cover- 
age in East Centrdl Illinois' and Western 
Indiana's rich market. WDAN gives you 
more listeners than all other stations com- 
bined! .-- " — .. 

February 1954 

CONIAN 
SURVEY 




DAY. 



WDAN 



NIGHT 



WDAN 

CBS RADIO 
DANVILLE, ILL. 

REPRESENTED BY 

EVERETT-McKINNEY, INC. 

NEW YORK — CHICAGO 



have an arbitral} maximum cost-per- 
I .' KX) in mind when the) da ide to use 
radio. Bui thai isn't the most efficient 
j ardstii k. It doesn't take into account 
Buch Factors .1- audience composition 
oi the psychological Factoi of getting 
the 1 ighl people al the 1 \-j\w time. No 
one I. n i>ii 1- enough to determine 
1 hoi< e "I .1 medium." 

\ikI a> Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
timebuyer Dave Wham observed: "On 
a cumulative basis of several weeks 
radio can deliver more audience na- 
tionally than l\ does — that is. in terms 
of audience turnover." 

General*) speaking, radio reps are 
delighted at the agenc) preoccupation 
the-,- days with the evaluation of radio 
"ii a number of different levels. The 
New York manager ol a veteran rep 
firm stated, "Complete measurement of 
radio can't help hut spotlight radio's 
importance." 



Q. What important steps are be- 
ing taken to provide new spot 
radio "yardsticks"? 

A. \- SPONSOR went to press, these 
were -nme of the most important proj- 
ects in the works: 

1. Coverage data: There hasn't heen 
a measurement of U. S. radio coverage, 
county-by-count) or station-by-station, 
since the Standard Audit ^v Measure- 
ment Service and Nielsen Coverage 
Service studies of 1952. Both sets of 
data are wideh used hv agencies, but 
are now obsolescent, particular!) in 
the markets to which tv has been added 
in the past two years. 

SAMS' Ken Baker told sponsor that 
he was not making an) plans to do 
another radio coverage study, due 
chief!) to lack of financial backing 
from broadcasters. A. C. Nielsen plans 
to conduct another NCS sur\e\ and 
has set a tentative date for this cover- 
age-and-set-census stud) in earl) 1955. 

Radio census figures will emerge 
from the large-scale stud) currentl) be- 
ing prepared b) \lfred Politz Research 
l"i the foiu radio webs and 1! \l». This 
stud) . however, i- primaril) an investi- 
gation of when radio is listened to. 
when and In whom. 

2. "' irea" ratings: Because of t\ 
competition, increased attention has 
heen focused ..n the kind of ratings a 
station gets throughout the area in 
whi< h it'- heard, nol jusl its metro- 
politan home base. 

In ' >' tobei \. C. Nielsen will -tan 



regulai measurements of "area'" listen- 
ing land viewing) for the Nielsen Sta- 
tion Index. First cities to be measured 
will he New York, Chicago and L.A.; 
in the following month Detroit. Phila- 
delphia and San Francisco will he add- 
ed with others to follow. The N->l 
will measure the per-broadcast audi- 
ences "I radio -how- in a station's 
"'inner" and "total'' area-, a- well as 
audience composition, four-week cum- 
ulatives, rrequenc) of listening, -hare 
and auto -el listening. First deliver) 
to subscribing agencies ha- not been 
set but ma) fall around I December. 
\t the same time, Pulse has been in- 
creasing active in "special order" 
area research. Pulse's Dr. Sydney 
Roslow told SPONSOR that his research 
firm has completed "some two dozen" 
special area studies for I . v . radio sta- 
tions since mid-1953. These stations 
include WKY, Oklahoma City; Kl V 

Portland. Ore.: WOW. Omaha: 
In \I!K. Little Rock; WHDH. Boston; 
KDKA, Pittsburgh, and WHAM, Ro- 
chester— among others. 

These studies follow the general 
principle of local Pulse radio checkup- 
foster recall to get quarter-hour lis- 
tening, out-of-home dialing I except 




1/4 



B kILOCV CLES 
C* — /"O 

of the 



San Francisco Bay Area's 
3,000,000 people are 
Foreign Language Speaking! 

They multiply, add, subtract and 
divide; THEY THINK! THEY BUY! 
in their own language! Sell them 
with KLOK, the station that reaches 
them all. KLOK's specialized pro- 
gramming guarantees your message 
attention-getting IMPACT! 

* SACRAMENTO 




Sen Jove Studios Sa" P'encico Studios 

P. O. Boi 967 Hotel lenkersh.m 

Sen Jose. Call' San Francisco. Calif 

Represented by John E. Pearson Co. _^___ 



204 



SPONSOR 



What's this talk about 

single station penetration 

of Southeastern New England? 



Q Is there really one radio station that de- 
livers top circulation throughout South- 
eastern New England — particularly Provi- 
dence, Fall River and New Bedford? 

A. Yes! WPRO is the dominant, top-rated station — 
with a 7.7 average quarter-hour Area Pulse* 
from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays . . . 57.1% 
greater than the second-place station . . . 13.2% 
greater than the next two stations combined. 



Q. Do WPRO's local programs — as well as 
CBS Radio programs — rate "first" 
throughout the area? 

A. Decisively! In fact, WPRO holds commanding 
audience leads in 51 out of the 52 quarter-hour 
reporting periods — 27 of which are devoted to 
WPRO-produced local programs with a 7.2 
average quarter-hour rating. 



Is WPRO top-rated in Fall River and New 
Bedford, Mass., as well as Providence and 
the entire area? 

Yes! A Fall River-New Bedford share of audi- 
ence analysis shows WPRO's index is 47.2% 
greater than the second-place station . . . 23.3% 
greater than the next two stations combined. 



Q. Why is WPRO so predominant in South- 
eastern New England? 

A. Because the personalities and programs — both 
local and network — are the personalities and 
programs Southeastern New Englanders like 
best . . . and because of WPRO's persuasive 
5,000 watt voice on a preferred frequency — 
630 kc. 



"Source — ■ Area Pulse, Jan.- 
Feb., 1954, surveying the 
State of Rhode Island and 
Bristol County, Mass. Area 



includes three major metro- 
politan markets — Provi- 
denre. Fall River and New 
Bedford . . . over 347,000 
radio homes. 






to reach the 
most buyers, 




Represented by JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



12 JULY 1954 



205 




I 

I 



"Sagebrush Serenade" 
"Western Requesrin" 
"Lee Nichols Show" 

THE MART STORES 

"For the first time we had 
volume sales that could directly 
be attributed to our advertising." 

DOUGLAS OPTICAL 

"We attribute a good share of 
our traffic to the terrific impact of 
our KWBB spot announcements." 



J 



1 




That's the important thing. Ratings, ad- 
jacencies, programming, network, don't 
mean a thing if you can't increase SALES. 

CAN WJPS GET RESULTS? 

Here are just a few: 

Sterling Beer — Mid-Continent Petroleum 

— Coco-Cola — Purina Mills — Puffin 
Biscuits — Hesmer's Foods — Economy 
Super Markets — P. W. Burns Insurance 

— International Harvester — Red Bird 
Gasoline — International Salt — and 
many others that we will send upon re- 
quest. 

We would like to "Ring the Cash Regis- 
ter" for you because we have the KNOW 
HOW. 
Let us prove our worth to you. 



Robert J. Mcintosh, General Manager 

lIKISINtfO IT 

The George P. Holllngbery Company 




<^J 



that the) are made in a station's entire 
coverage ana. I hi- area, in the case 
1. 1 Bome stations, can be anything up 

to two dozen counties in six or Beven 
states. Said Dr. Roslow: 

"Stations and buyers alike are 1»<-- 
< oming conscious ol the value of "area 
measurement in determining a station's 
effectiveness in attracting audiences. 
Homes-using-radio figures in a '<its 
ana are l>\ no means always true of 
the total" area. Even the out-of-home 
pattern varies. 

"Currently, we expect t<> do about 
in ' . more special-order area measure- 
ments for stations in the next year than 
we did this past year." 

3. Other studies: Several other re- 
search irons are in the fire. BAB has 
tentati\el\ slated an extensive measure- 
ment of auto radio listening later this 
year or in earh 1955. Several rep 
firms which have recent radio research 
studies (such as the "Radio in tv mar- 
kets" stud\ made 1>\ Politz for the 
Henry I. Christal stations) plan to 
repeat or expand their research into 
the qualitative and out-of-home as- 
pects of radio listening. The Station 
Representatives Assn. has discussed 
plans for a series of special studies of 
audience composition of spot programs 
and how they compare with competi- 
tor network programing. Pulse is now- 
measuring out-of-home listening I which 
can be combined with in-home listen- 
ing for a "total" metro-area rating I 
in 25 markets, an increase of more 
than 40% over the number measured 
by Pulse a year ago. 

i See chart pages 198-199 which 
gives you analysis of strengths and 
weaknesses, key facts about rating 
services. ) 



Over-all 



"A RADIO IN EVERY ROOM" 

Evansville, Indiana 



Q. What's the "State of the 
Union" in spot radio today? 
A. For the most part, excellent. 

Figures compiled annually by the 
Federal Communications Commission 

which cover national spot radio rev- 
enue- ol stations after trade discounts 
and before commissions to reps — show 
the follow ing picture: 

1. I here has been a stead) growth 
iii spot radio billings, year after year, 
and iln- growth has held up strongl\ 
all during the postwar period. 

2. Starting at a 1947 level ol 198,- 



581,241 spot radio b) L948 grew some 

-i\ million dollar-: bj \')V) spot ra- 
dio was up another four million: 1950 
saw a nearK 10 million annual in- 
crease. I hen a pause — in 1951 the 
growth slowed to one million. But in 
19~>2 the growth stepped up to about 
four million and last \ear. spot radio 
hilled a tremendous 12 million more 
than the previous >ear — an increase of 
some 37' i over the 1947 mark. The 
L954 outlook i- at Least equal to L953. 
3. This growth has come during a 
period when great fundamental changes 
were takin« place in the advertising 
world a period during which t\ grew 
from an experimental to a full-fledged 
advertising medium competing heavil) 
with radio both for the advertiser's 
dollar and the consumer's attention. 



Q. Will the general outlook for 
spot radio continue to be good this 
fall? 

A. The outlook continues to be opti- 
mistic. 

As Reg Rollinson. general manager 
of the Station Representatives Vssocia- 
tion's "Crusade for Spot Radio" ob- 
served in a speech last month to the 
Florida Broadcasters \ssociation: 




THE MIGHTY "MIKE 'OF 

SAN ANTONIO 

250,000 Milliwatts 

Mww 

National Time Sales — New York 

Harlan G. Oakes & Assoc. 
Los Angeles — San Francisco 



206 



SPONSOR 



/? ? 1, 9 1. , 1 ? ? 

• r • • • 






? ? 




50,000 WHATS ? 



P 



Station power by itself is only part of 
the story, and the fact that WTIC is 
the most powerful station in Southern 
New England would not interest an 
advertiser were it not for the confidence 
and loyalty of our listeners. Over the 
years, WTIC's policy of careful screening 
of advertisers, high standards of 
entertainment and public service has 
made our programs unexcelled 
backgrounds for messages that sell. 



FOR YOUR SELLING... 

use WTIC 



WTIC 



DOMINATES THE PROSPEROUS 
SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND MARKET 



12 JULY 1954 



207 



Almost all the audience 
All the time! 




SELLING & SERVING 

South Eastern B. C. 

'ELLIOTT HAYNES DAY RATING 93.6% 
ELLIOTT HAYNES NIGHT RATING 89.9% 



KWJJ 



"Oregon Country 
Happy Hunting Ground 
for Smart Advertiser.'' 

Take it from KWJJ — Chief of 
the Northwest Independents — 
there's good hunting for adver- 
tisers who want buyers with 
"plenty wampum ". Advertisers 
plenty smart who use KWJJ for 
spot announcements with "big 
sell" in "big" country. CO; >( 

National \ \ : 

Representative ^^v^ /~^' ' 

BURN-SMITH CO.. INC - "^ ^"» 




1011 S.W. 6th Ave. 

PORTLAND 5, 
OREGON 




"Radio i- .i totallj new concept in 
advertising, different from all other 
media in that it i- total. \<>t the best 
homes, not tin- urban bomes, not wom- 
en only, not men only, not children 
onl\ . 1 hi t total. 

"And ii has that vast untapped re- 
Bource oi local talent, local programs 
which regional and national advertis- 
ers are onl\ beginning to appreciate. 
Further, national -pot ladio offers un- 
told opportunities for new creative de- 
vices where media, cop) and plan- 
departments join together to create 
new products c patterns." 



Q. What accounts for the steady 
growth of spot radio — despite tv? 
A. There's no single answer. Actu- 
ally, a combination of circumstances 
have worked in spot radio- favor in 
the past near-decade: 

1. Spot vs. network'. Before tv ad- 
MTii-ci- wiie -ometinies reluctant to 
buj into and around local shows, pre- 
ferring: evening chainbreaks next to 
the big network radio shows. Spot ra- 
iiio programs played second advertis- 
ing fiddle. 

Tv changed all that. Big-name tele- 
vision -how- drew off a lot of audi- 
ence for network radio program-, par- 
ticularly in the Class A (7:30 p.m. to 
10:30 p.m. I period. At the same time 
as radios base expanded from the 
1946 level of 57,750,000 sets to 117,- 
i mi i.DOO this year (see page 1 of Radio 
Basics i spot programing on network 
affiliates grew steadih in value as 
rating levels held up. despite t\- in 
non-network time. 

Nowhere i- tlti- situation more clear 
than in a comparison between morning 
and nighttime programing. Morning 
radio — and it - primarily -pot radio 
up to 9:00 a.m. — is the most popular 
buj today; evening network radio i 
tougher to -ell. Ten \ears ago. the 
situation wa- reversed. 

2. Ifore research: \ n examination 
n| the latest radio research (see Radio 
Basics, page 229) will show how mu< h 
ol ii i- working in favor of spot radio. 
I niil recent!) such fai tors as out-of- 
hoine listening and cumulative audi- 

ui tv no! used as buj ing yard- 
sticks in spot broadcasting, foda) 
thej are and the local programing 
slanted at both the home and out-of- 
home audience (music, new-, weather. 
traffic bulletins) and the across-the- 
board local programing (newscasts, 



farm pro-ram-, music strips, d.j. 
-how- 1 benefits from more advertising 

dollar-. 

Stations and rep- are accelerating 

their research acti\it\ isee report on 
Spot radio yardsticks, page 200), pro- 
du< ing or subsidizing special area re- 
port- ami qualitative studies of the 
ladio audier ■ 

3. Pinpointed audiences: Radio 
stations have always had more free- 
dom in developing localized programs 
than have network-. That's because 
radio networks, as a rule, have aimed 
primaril) for the mythical "avei 
I . S. listener" while local Nations — 
particularh the independents — have 
tailored their shows to fit local peculi- 
arities of local tastes, population, ra- 
cial backgrounds, working hour- and 
< limates. 

In the pa-t half decade -pot radio 
has therefore been aide to offer the na- 
tional advertiser a wide varietj of inn- 
pointed audiences at all hour- of the 
da\ and night. In general these spot 
audiences are more specialized than 
anything now available via network ra- 
dio or network t\ . 

Such audience- are due to the in- 
i reasing amount ol such program fare 



WANT TO SELL 
CANADA? 

One radio station 

covers 40% of 

Canada's retail 



sales 




TORONTO 

50,000 WATTS, JOJO K.C. 

CFRB covers over 1 5 the homes in 
Canada, covers the market area that 
accounts for 40^ of the retail sales. 
That makes CFRB your No. 1 buy in 
Canada's No. 1 market. 



REPRESENTATIVES 
United States: Adorn J. Young Jr., Incorporated 
Canada: All-Canada Radio Facilitiet, Limited 



208 



SPONSOR 



Here's Selling Power! 

WKMF is Flint's most popular 
radio station . . . proven by a local 
impartial survey. Flint's only 24 
hour 'round the clock music-news 
station with top radio personali- 
ties, including Flint's No. 1 disc 
jock, Jim Rockwell and two others 
in the top bracket. Here is area 
saturation for your sales message 
in the billion dollar Flint market. 
Here is the way to increased 
profits for you in 1954. And re- 
member! WKMF is in the Mich- 
igan Golden Triangle . . . the 6 
billion dollar market that's ripe 
for the picking. 

WKMH-WKHM-WKMF . . . 

package buy of these 3 strategically 
located Michigan stations offers 
you maximum coverage at mini- 
mum cost. 



Only Exclusive 

disc jockey radio 
station in Flint 




Michigan Market 



Mich 
Golde 



WKMF 




Represented by Head ley- Reed 



<fW 



WKHM 
WKMH 



JACKSON 
1000 WATTS 

DEARBORN — 5000 WATTS 
1000 WATTS-NIGHTS 



MICHIGAN — 1000 WATTS 



The SieflutffGtt Station in Flint 




i 



BILL SNYDER > 

KWBB 
SPORTS CASTER 

'Formerly St. Louis Browns* 



■A" Last 4 years carried Wichita 
Indians baseball exclusive. 

■fa Standard Oil Company of In- 
diana sponsored all at home 
and away Wichita University 
football schedule last 2 years. 

■^ Theo. Hamms Brewing Com- 
pany has sponsored Wichita 
Indians baseball at home and 
away, last 2 years. 



I 




000 WAITS 




SUPER 
SALES FLAN 

i\*#\J Hers "Merchandising 
Magic" with the new SUPER SALES 
PLAN. Now. any grocery prod- 
ucts advertiser can be assured 



distribution 

preferred location 

displays 

shelf promotion 

newspaper advertising 

store bulletins 



36 SUPER VALUE SUPER MAR- 
KETS. These merchandising 
"plusses" are available to food ad- 
vertisers who buy a minimum 
schedule of $125 for 13 weeks on 
KSO. You choose your own guaran- 
teed times. For further informa- 
tion call, write or wire KSO or 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 

Basic ABC Network 



:•:■:■:■:•:• 
III 



. 




1 .i-: locall) developed radio person- 
alities, from d.j.'s t'» newscasters; 
Negro-appeal shows, primaril) on in- 
dependent outlets; classical music pro- 
graming, again mostl) on indepen- 
dents; barn dance and hillbilh pro- 
grams Featuring local musical talent; 
local "service" programing that in- 
cludes new-, traffic ami weather bulle- 
tins; foreign-language programing in 
every language from Spanish and Ital- 
ian to I [ungarian. 

4. Price structure: Spot radio rates 
have played a large part in the steads 
growth of spot radio in recent seasons. 

As tv won a\\a\ a sizable amount of 
nighttime radio audiences, radio sta- 
tions < ountered by setting up single 
rate structures, whereby dav and night 
rates were the same. The SRA now 
estimates, for instance, that more than 
half of the I . S. outlets in tv areas 
now 7 have such an arrangement, or 
have discount structures which amount 
to the same thing. 

At the same time many radio out- 
lets have also set up special saturation 
schedules for advertisers who want to 
achieve heavy impact through the 
cumulative effect of radios audience 
turnover. From the station's stand- 
point, the saturation campaign has 
been a useful \\a\ b) which to sell 
more nighttime radio. 

On the other hand something like 
209< <>f the I. S. radio outlets — by 
the SRAs guesstimate — have raised 
their early-morning or daytime rates 
in the past three years as daylight ra- 
dio became increasingly valuable. 
And since these rates have generallv 
run behind the growth of daytime audi- 
ence, advertisers have been quick to 
1 u\ for the most part. 

Lastly the very spread of radio rates 
— everything from a $2 spot announce- 
ment on a minor station to a $5,000- 
weekly saturation drive on a major 
metropolitan outlet — has encouraged 
business from ever) type and size of 
national ad\ertiser. Network media, 
although far more flexible in recent 
years than the) were in 1944. are more 
limited in their abilits to tailor vehi- 
cles lor the medium and small-budget 
sponsor. 

Transcribed shows 

Q. What's new in the transcribed 
radio program field? 
A. Network stations arc turning in- 
reasingh toward ihe makers ol tran- 



scribed programs to help fill their pio- 
ji. uning needs. Reports from Frederic 
\\ . Zi\. Ham S. Goodman, RCA Re- 
corded Program Services and other 
firms all support this finding. 

The dwindling of network program- 
ing has given rise to a substantial de- 
mand for bigh-calibre nighttime pro- 
grams, reports \l\in E. I nger, vice 
president in charge of -ales at Zi\. 
though daytime shows are also much 
wanted. For some time, big-name dra- 
ma shows have been an important part 
of the Zi\ stable (with such stars as 
Humphrej Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Is. 
rone Power, Dick Powell); but this 

year, Ziv, for the first time, produced 
a show with a big-name corned) Btar, 
Red Skelton. making a "network-level" 
performer available to stations at a 
nominal cost. \ow considered a "huge 
success" h\ Zi\. the half-hour Red 
Skelton Show was released in Febru- 
ary 1954, is now running on ovej 380 
stations in major and secondary mar- 
kets. 

Station.^ are running Skelton gener- 
all\ five times a week. s ( >H it in single 
or multiple sponsorships. Of the spon- 
sors using the show. W.Y '< have taken 
it as a full program buy. main have 
bought it regionally for several sta- 
tions. It is available for from S10 to 
$500 a show, depending on market 
size. 

Note the "63%" fiuure here. Broad- 
casters attending the \ARTB Conven- 
tion reported a trend toward full spon- 
sorship of qualits programs rather 
than just participations in these pro- 
grams, points out Unger; broadcast- 
ers had formerl) indicated that adver- 
tisers favored participations over full 
program Inns. 

Zi\ will expand its coined\ opera- 
tions still further. It has just signed 
a contract with Fddie Cantor which 
will involve an expenditure of over 
> ( ).ii(io.inio during the next seven \ears. 
I he contract calls for the making of 
39 half-hour films annualb and a sim- 
ilar number of taped radio programs 
each year, the taping of the radio se- 
ries to run concurrent!) with the t\. 
I lie s)i,,u ui|| be tailed The Eddie 




BILL POWELL 

Specializes in the 
NEGRO 

HICH SCHOOL & COLLEGE 
MARKET vio 

WSO K 

NASHVILLE TENNESSEE 



210 



SPONSOR 




WSYR 

PULSE OF SYRACUSE - FEB., 1954 



15-Min. periods, 
6 a.m. to midnight 




WSYR FIRST in 54 periods 

WSYR SECOND ... in 18 periods 

72 

(that's all there is) 

WSYR FIRST in 15 periods 

WSYR SECOND . . . in _J_ period 

16 



15-Min. periods, 
6 p.m. to midnight 



WSYR FIRST 



. in 24 periods 

(a clean sweep!) 



And, of course, 
the last Nielsen 
and SAMS story 
still stands: 



NIELSEN SAMS 

WSYR FIRST WSYR FIRST 

by 47% to 21 2£ by 29.8 £ to 239% 



I! 




ACUSE 



570 KC 



NBC Affiliate • Write, Wire, Phone 
or Ask Henry I. Christal Co. Inc. 



WSYR-AM-FM-TV — The Only Complete Broadcasting Institution in Central New York 



12 JULY 1954 



211 




POWER 





Now under construction is 
WQXR's new 50,000 watt 
transmitter . . . another great 
milestone in the history of the 
nation's No. 1 good music 
station. 

It will be a great day for music 
lovers when WQXR becomes 
the first good music and news 
station to go 50 KW. And an 
even greater day for alert ad- 
vertisers who know the value 
of a big market of above-aver- 
age prospects. 

Better get in touch with us 
now to hear how more power 
to us means more power to you. 



WQXR 



The Radio Station of The New York Times 

W. i;3r<l Street, N. w York 36, N. V. 



Cantoi Theatre, will star Cantoi in one 
miii ol three shows, use him a- bosl 
in the othei two l"i top Hollywood 
names. Production has Btarted ami 
Xi\ expects to have both the radio ami 
u series read) t<> be released before 
the end "I this \ ear, ac< ording to 
l"lm I.. Sinn, president ol /i\ I \ 
Programs. 

Ziv offers •"><) series "I packaged 
-how- plus nearly 6,000 individual 
programs of all types. Sales of Xi\ 
radio programs from Jul) 1953 
through \la\ IT> I reached a higher 
level (34$ higher) than during any 
other similar period in the company's 
history. Numerous inquiries on new 
show releases and station requests for 
advance bookings on shows point t<> 
an extra-health) fall season, says I ti- 
ger. 

The Harry S. Goodman Co. is 
also pleased with the way things are 
going. Slate- Kverett Goodman, man- 
ager of the firm. "It's surprising how 
healths our business is getting. The 
first six months of this year, we did 
about !<>', better than in am -i\ 
mouths of our history. In fact, in just 
one week recently, we did more busi- 
ness in transcribed announcements 
than we did in the last six months of 
last year." 

Partly responsible for this new re- 
surgence of business has been the com- 
pany 's new "Double Exposure" plan — 
a plan to help program-hungry stations 
fill <zaps and attract sponsors. It < (in- 
sists of a package of 15 different half- 
hour mystery-adventure shows with 52 
episodes each (such show- a- Murder 
ul Midnight. Mystery House. Deadline 
for Danger). The choice of mystery- 
adventure was determined b\ the 
l!\l!> findings about the continuing 
high popularity of such programs on 
radio, sa) - < roodman. 

Stations can bin a minimum of 
three of these shows 1 2(>0 half-hours 
a year! to run across-the-board. Sev- 
eral (d the show- in the group have re- 
broadcast riahts without additional tal- 
ent fee-, which is where the economy 

"I the plan — and the "double expo- 
sure idea enter-. Ii enables tin- same 
-eric- to he broadcast twice in one 

week oii< e in the da) time, once at 

night, -o that if a station fill- five half- 
hours a week with .1 given program, 
it actuall) pays Eor onl) three a week. 

1 I' ive ol the 1 5 -how- were made in 

Australia which eliminates rebroadcast 



First station to bu) this plan was 

\\()|{. New ^ ork. which has been |i|o- 

graming 10 hours weekl) with these 
-how- [WOR Radio Playhouse) run- 
ning L,040 half hour- in one year. 
About 12 other stations have contract- 
ed for this plan so far, says Goodman, 
practically all network stations, and 
representing all foui network-. The) 

have been doing \er\ little business 
with indie station-. 

Stations are Belling most ol the 
'Double Exposure" shows to partici- 
pating sponsor- oi in quarter-hour seg- 
ments, -tuto Goodman, rarely a- sin- 
gle sponsorships. Each -how provides 
for a maximum of four participations 
plus an opening and closing billboard 
for each sponsor. 

RCA Recorded Program Services re- 
ports that the biggest development of 
the year for them has been the new 
growth in the popularity of their soap 
operas. This, according to A. B. Sam- 
brook, manager of the company, indi- 
cates a new interest on the part of sta- 
tions in strengthening daytime pro- 



LTaminj.'. 



I he firm offers three soap opera-: 
Dr. Paul, fun/ Mary and Betty and 
Bob. The first-mentioned Dr. Paul was 
acquired h\ RCA in the past vear (af- 
ter having been sponsored for \ ear- 
on NBC b) Wesson Oil and Snowdrift 
Sales and having rounded up big rat- 
ings). Since then, the company has 
been promoting these shows to stations 
in a package 15 minutes id program- 
ing a day, five days a week — at a spe- 
cial price. 

Sales of these soaps have risen more 
this year than sales of anv other t\pe 
of show they offer, states Sambrook. 
RCA"s syndicated stable also includes 
musicals, drama-, mysteries, juvenile 
and sport shows, 21 series in all. out- 
side the soaps, ranging from half- 
hours to five-minute show-. 

Stations are running the serials 
largel) in the morning, to build a day- 
time women- audience early in tin- 
day. They are selling them primaril) 
in full quarter hour- ' rather than par- 
ticipations > . with bakeries and dairies 
two predominating types of sponsors. 

There are enough episodes of these 
three serials to enable them to run for 
year.- on a Btation, -a\- Sambrook, and 
more can be produced: Dr. Paul has 
almost 1,000 episodes; lunt Mar\. 
605; Betty and Boh. 390. 

With the renewed daytime trend. 
soaps will be even more popular among 



212 



SPONSOR 






It won't help you 

if it's not available 




In Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego you 
can woo customers into your stockade through the 
open gates of KHJ, KFRC and KGB. Consistently 
good ratings are available ... to you . . . with no 
fences of elusive high ratings so often quoted but not 
available when you want them. 

Low, low daytime rates apply to nighttime too, on 
Don Lee's three key stations that cover California's 
three prime markets. Singly or together, you'll find 
KHJ, KFRC and KGB are your best buys ... at the 
lowest cost per thousand. For programs or spots 
that are available ... to you . . . corral your Don Lee 
or H-R Representative today. 




KEY STATIONS OF 



DjOJfi L EtB 



RADIO 



Represented Nationally by H _ R REPRESENTATIVES, Inc. 



12 JULY 1954 



213 



stations in the i oming i ths, 

. ,i-t- Sambrook. Since m< --i othei syn- 
,11, ated Bhowa issued b) l!< \ and the 
othei 51 re made foi evening 

broadcast, there will be a - orrespond- 
inglj IM , reased need foi othei daytime 
shows ,i- well, I"- states. 

( li.ii les Michelson also notes new 
ai h\ it\ w ith his soap operas. He re- 
ports thai several large independi nl 
stations have rei entl) boughl The Life 
of 1/,/m Sothern and Pretty Kitty Kel- 
ly, mainl) Foi before-10-a.m. program- 
ing. II'' ;il-" finds thai mysteries are 

■ 

in demand, is cui rentl) working \\ ith 
three radio reps h ho plan to clear at 
I, asl an houi each weekday evening 
on theii several stations to i un a block 
.if his half-hour mystery shows across- 
the-board. 



Program, sales services 

Q. What new trends are there 
among the radio program and 
sales services? 

A. What have been referred to in the 
past .i- "music libraries" or "library 
services" are todav more accurately 



described as "program and sales serv- 
ii \\ i, rid Broadcasting, 

lii \"- Thesaurus and Lang-Worth 
w, i, suppliers of musi< transcriptions 
foi radio stations; today they not only 
pro> ide a librarj ol 5,000 or more mu- 
sical sele lien- pin- complete scripted 
and la el) . all-e.t. i programs, thej 
also aid stations in Belling these pro- 
grains and other time as well. I hej 
prov i le recorded jingles for a \ ai iety 
ol -i 30rs, I'M" linn-- and colorful art 

to help the local salesman sell the cli- 
ent, tips on radio selling methods, 
merchandising material foi local ad- 
vertisers, among other sales-boosting 
services (see article in SPONSOR, 17 

\la\ 1954, page 50). 

Willi all these aids provided by the 
program and sales services, a local ra- 
dio station has something tangible to 
oiler an advertiser. The radio sales- 
man no longer has to go out "cold" to 
trj and sell the local drug store or 
taxi cab company on the idea of buy- 
ing a program or participation. W hen 
he steps out to sell the jeweler or the 
super market across the street, he has 
on hand a battery of catchy commer- 
cial jingles and "lead-ins" specially 
tailored for the t\pe of prospective 







is Dixie's f« s 



air traffic increases 
^ £are further proof that 

MIAMI 

,o>N'» n 9 Kev barker 

%0* Last year, Miami was the nation's 




No. 1 Port of Entry for air passengers 

from foreign shores . . . and ranked 2nd in the 

nation in total number of plane movements ! 

And, the first four months of '54 already show 

number of passengers up 1 5.5%, Air Cargo up 

7.5%, Air Mail up 14.9% ! Kinda' bears us out 

that they keep flocking in . . . not only on 

wheels and rails, but on wings, too ! 

Call your Hollingbery Man and let him tell you 

what a whale of a job WIOD's doing every 

day in this newest of all Key Markets ! 



James M. LeGate, Genera/ Manager 

5.000 WATTS . 610 KC . NBC Affiliate 

National Rep , George P. Hollingbery Co. 




Miami 



Fl OR,da 



sponsoi he is visiting. He can al-o 
offer a variety of other commercial 
pegs, -ii' li as holiday and special-oc- 
i asion < ampaigns, with which the spon- 
sor can tie in. 

I hen has been an increase in the 
demand among stations for -how- in 
which multiple participations can be 
-old. according l<> -poke-men for these 
In in-, pointing to an increased intere-t 
on the part of advertisers in buying 
Local radio participations- -especially 
in -how- with big-name stars such a- 
lhe-e services supply. 

To help meet the demand for top- 
star show- which can be used as par- 
ticipating vehicles and which require 
no scripts oi Bpecial announcer-person- 
nel, W orld Broadcasting has come up 
with what it <all> it- "ComET" Plan 
lan abbreviation for "'complete elec- 
trical transcription" l . The plan was 
first announced at the NARTB Conven- 
tion and will be formally launched by 
World station-subscribers on 15 Sep- 
tember, according to Pierre W eis. gen- 
eral manager of W orld. 

W orld's ComET Plan feature- The 
Betty Grable-Harry James Shoiv de- 
signed to run one hour a da\. five da\s 
a week for 52 weeks 1 260 show- a 
year). A husband-wife chatter-and d.j. 
show in which the two big-name stars 
do all the introducing of numbers 1>\ 
leading hands and top-star vocalists, 
it has room for 15 commercial an- 
nouncements i 12 one-minute, three 
half-minute slots); stations can sell 
these to sponsors individually or in a 
varietv of combinations. 

This is the first time W orld has pro- 
duced a show of this length and type 
ail on an e.t. and with no script, open- 
end st\lc i the station selects specific 
vocal or band selections indicated on 
the e.t and at the proper time plavs 
them on another turntable i . It is 
available only to World subscribers at 
a nominal charge of SI per show and 
to date some 325 stations have signed 
for the plan. These include contract 
extension- and renewal- as well as new 
subscribers, among them big network 
powerhouses seeking programing to 
fill evening gap-. 

The increasing interest of the big 
network stations in their services is 
significant, says Wei-: as the networks 
offer less and lc-s in the way of pro- 
graming, he declares, services like 
World which can provide the stations 
with attractive big-name programs, 



214 



SPONSOR 




He reaches customers in kitchen and car 






Want to talk to the lady of the house while she's 
preparing the evening meal? Want to get the ear 
of her husband while he's driving his car? 

Then let Hal Morgan tell your food, beverage, 
drug or automotive story on "Morgan's Matinee" 
- — the sixty-minute show with double-barreled 
appeal for homemakers and motorists alike. 

From 4:00 to 5:45 each weekday afternoon, 
Hal Morgan serves up a blend of good music, news, 
weather, time and road conditions . . . preferred 
fare for the man driving home from work, and 
for the homemaker in the kitchen. 

While Morgan is on the air, Greater Cleveland 
traffic is at its peak. Over a quarter-million motor- 
ists are on the move — 90% with car radios! 
During this same period, radios are tuned to 
Hal Morgan by busy homemakers. 



Reach customers in a mood to buy — on 
"Morgan's Matinee"! Participations and quarter- 
hour segments available. Check your nearest 
Christal office today. 




THE STATION WITH 

4/2 MILLION FRIENDS 
IN NORTHERN OHIO 

CBS— Cleveland — 50,000 Wafts 

The Peoples Broadcasting Corp. 

Represented by The Henry I. Christal Co., New York 

In Canada by Radio Time Sales, Ltd., Toronto 



12 JULY 1954 



215 



w ill l>c more important to them. 

In line- uiih the growing demand 

i i 1 1 ■_• |n ograms, \\ orld is 

planning about six new five-a-week 

ted hall-limn and quarter-houi 

musi< .il shows. 

\\ 01 l<l boasts ovei 1,000 station-sub- 
si ribei -. repoi ts thai its production 
budget foi the firsl sis months ol L95 1 
m i- up 15' ■ "\ ei last j eai . 

lit \- Thesaurus also stresses as the 
important trend ilii- year the increas- 
ing use "I participating announi ements 
in librarj sei \ ice shows rather than 
single sponsorships. I he) hax e de- 



signed — i j < 1 1 new shows as Penthouse 
Party, hosted b) Nelson Eddj and fea- 
turing top \ "■ .il stars, to cai i \ up to 
seven participations <>n one haif-houi 
stanza, and Welachrino Musicale to 
provide foi foui announcements per 
quartei hour. Each show, however, is 
flexible and can be -<>ld b) stations in 
a variet) <>l ways. 

Reflecting the ever-increasing Bales- 
consciousness in the field, ilii- year fur 
the first time, Thesaurus has made 
available merchandising and point-of- 
sale material to the sponsors of one 
id ii- ~h< iw -. The Hour of Charm i with 




1 % ^i*** 09 "*!* 



V,»\s 




IktwCs tgowtfilil Words, 
^rhtr, j*d wt'vtqot 
cattle <jnd oil wellsib 
b<3ck ikctiL up/' 




• KTUL blankets the rich 22-county area of Northeastern 
OKLAHOMA where 805,000 people have an effective 
BUYING INCOME of $1,064,307,000 and SPEND 
S696,809,000 annually on merchandise. KTUL is a 
welcome "salesman" in 242,360 RADIO HOMES in this 
fabulous Market! 

• For the complete, graphic story of KTUL's TULSA 
MARKET, write to George Ketcham, Promotion Director. 



CBS Radio 

in 
Northeastern 
OKLAHOMA 



KTUL 



Affiliated 

with 

KFPW 

Fort Smith, Ark. 



L. A. BLUST, Jr., Vies Pros. -Gen. Mgr. 

AVERY-KNODEL, Inc., National Rep. 



Phil Spitalny's all-girl orchestra;. 

Starting in August, Thesaurus sub- 
scribers will receive the Grst selections 
in a new series of "Sell Effects" sin- 
gle-word transcriptions designed to tie 
in with local commercials (these are 
in addition t<> the firm's Binging jin- 
gles). 

In May, Thesaurus launched a new 
five-minute musical <|tii/ show, Quickie 
Quiz, representing a somewhat differ- 
ent programing approach for the firm 
(whose 3 1 shows in half-hour and 
quarter-houi lengths arc largel) 
straight musicals with top-name vo- 
calists and band leaders). Featuring 
Ralph Flanagan and orchestra, it i- an 
audience participation !>it express!) 
designed ti> ti<- in with local events and 
sponsors connected with them. Ten 
five-minute shows are available each 
week, and most stations run two a day. 
\rtists in Thesaurus shows include 
such names as Eddie fisher. Johmrj 
Desmond, June \ alii. Beatrice Kay, 
Fran Warren, Sannm Kaye. 

Lang-Worth Feature Programs re- 
ports that it has increased its < ustomer 
list 1>\ 25^5 since 1 September 1953. 
"'We are todax re-signing radio sta- 
tions that two or three years ago de- 
cided to get along without a program 
service." sax- Lang-Worth President 
C. O. Langlois. 

in the planning of new programs, 
Lang'Worth is now working hand-in- 
glove with a committee of executives 
from sex rial advertising agencies all 
over the countr) to bring in a practi- 
cal advertise] viewpoint Rather than 
design shows merelx to attract audi- 
ences as in the past and for single 
sponsors, Lang-Worth has revamped 
its approach to a more sales-conscious 
one. is now gearing programs toward 
the much-in-demand multiple sponsor- 
ships. 

First of the new-type -how- i- the 
Russ Morgan Show, a dailj 30-minute 
-tan/a with fixe one-minute availabili- 
ties per program which will start (> 
September. \t presstime, it was sold 
in 504 markets. It is a new departure 
for Lang-Worth in more ways than 
one. It i- the first show that the firm 
i- marketing individual!) — that is. to 
non-subscriber as well as subscriber 
stations. It i- also the firm's first show 
for which no script is needed — the m.c. 
role is taken oxer b) the -tar. in the 

style of open-end show-, while the lo- 
cal d.j. plays the tunes. There is a big 
need for this open-end type of Bhow, 






216 



SPONSOR 



Announcing 

the appointment of 

H-R inc. 



as the National Representative 



for Radio 



1 333 iT 



O M A 



Another step toward even better service for KOWH advertisers is the appointment of H-R Inc. 
as National Representatives for "America's Most Listened-To Independent Station." 

And just to cinch the "Most Listened-To" title even more firmly, KOWH just completed its 32nd 
month in first place in Omaha by setting a newrecord. With a day-time r/itnig of -f6.2 (, , KOWH 
has just topped the mark for share of audience in a six-station area. 

And with an average like that, any spot vou pick at random has a better than even chance of 
delivering you a bigger listening audience than a spot on alt other Omaha-Council Bluffs stations 
combined! 



JH4 



•VCONTINENT BROADCASTING CO. 



General Manager; Todd Storz 

KOWH WTIX WHB 

Represented by Represented by Represented by 

H-R Inc. Adam J. Young, Jr. John Blair & Co. 



12 JULY 1954 217 




HUNTINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA 
SERVING 3 STATES - 




says Langlois, and more will follow 
from l.ang-\\ orth. 

This year Lang-Worth made a tran- 
Bcribed Bales lecture course available 
to subscribers titled "Selling and Ser- 
vicing Local Radio \ccounts settiiif.' 
fortli basic groundwork in radio Bell- 
ing as well as new angles and ideas. 
The company plan- to continue these 
aids, transcribed by President Lang- 
lois himself. It also plans additional 
releases of musical commercials which 
have been extremely popular with ad- 
vertisers, reports Langlois. 

Associated Program Service ( a di- 
vision of the Muzak Corp.) now has a 
"permanent" library of some 7.0(H) 
musical selections plus -ales aids \\hi< li 
it rents to subscribers, plans no change 
in ibis setup right now. Its collec- 
tion includes musical production as- 
sists such as themes, fanfares, bridges 
and sound effects. Selling aids, aside 
Irom time and weather jingles and ad- 
vertiser lead-ins, feature a series of 
transcribed sales talks b\ former APS 
V.P. Maurice B. Mitchell (now Presi- 
dent of Encyclopaedia Britannica 
Films i . designed to be run off at sta- 
tion sales meetings. 

APS rents its librar\ at a monthly 
rate of $62.50 to all stations, regard- 
less of size, on a minimum three-year 
contract. It currently has 483 subscrib- 
ers. 

Although APS no longer issues new 
releases or services, in the past 18 
months it has had a higher net than 
at any time in its history, according 
to Edward Hochhauser Jr.. vice presi- 
dent and general manager. The reason 
is that it operates at minimal cost, via 
direct mail. 

Pop. light concert and dance music 
dominate the APS librarv. though n<>\- 
elty, hillbilly, band and religious selec- 
tions are included. Featured are such 
names as Rosemary Clooney, Guj Mil- 
died. Vic Damone, Errol Garner, Xav- 
ier Cusat. 



Farm radio 

Q. Isn't most farm programing in 
rural areas? 

A. Obviousl) a great deal of farm 
broadcasting is done by stations lo- 
cated in predominant!) rural areas. 
However, <>!'< of the radio stations 
and 17', of the t\ Btations responding 
to Program Guide questionnaires said 
the) carried farm programs. [Pro- 



gram Guide is the breakdown on local 
I . S. radio and tv programing re- 
centl) published by Sponsor Services 
Inc.) Included in the list of stations 
with farm programing are such urban 
nutlet- as \\ \B'I (tv), WABC and 
WOK. New York; WGN-AM-TV, 
\\ M \0. \\ NBQ, \\BBM-\\1-T\ and 
\\ LS, Chicago, and other outlets. 

(For details on the farm market. 
see SPONSOR'S special farm section, 18 
October 1954. See al-o Farm t\. page 
102.) 



IN'egro radio 

Q. What's the most important 
thing to remember when selling 
to Negroes? 

A. Best ie-uli- come from using Ne- 
gro performers or announcer-. Never 
use artificial Negro speech; let the 
station rewrite your commercials, if 
necessan. to -uit its market. Consis- 
tence in .Negro advertising is impor- 
tant as with all advertising. 

Q. How many Negro stations are 

there in the U. S.? 

A. Program Guide li-ts 22 statinn- 



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1953 




289 Pages 682 Pages 889 Pages 951 Pages 1254 Pages 1357 Pages 1608 Pages 



SPONSOR 



The magazine radio and tv advertisers use 



SPONSOR builds on a solid basis. Our policy: turn out useful issues and the 
advertising will follow. This common-sense approach to tv and radio trade 
paper publishing has appealed to station advertisers increasingly since 
our first issue in November 1946. Our promise for 1954: new, improved 
use departments, more use articles for buyers of radio and television. 




which are L0095 Negro programed 
and 82 othei stations h ith a i onsider- 

able am. .mil ..I Negro programing. 
I here were '<' I -i.iin.n~ re-po inline t>. 
the Guide questionnaires i2V, «>f the 
total respondents) which program at 
I. .1-1 partiall) l"i the Negro audience. 

Q. What's new in Negro radio? 

A. Possibl) ill.' latest in Negro pro- 

in- i- the National Negro Net- 

u..iL which aii- Rub] I (dentine (a 

serial Btor) i on I '. -l.ilion-. Sponsors 
include Pel Milk. I'hilip Morris cig- 



arettes and Wriglej gum. \n interest- The Negro market represents a lot of 
rag la. t i- that representatives for money, too. In the Birmingham area, 
Negro stations told sponsor that "tv for instance, more than 240.000 Ne- 
ts not hurting Negro radio at all; it's groes spend more than §248 million 
-till an untapped goldmine." ever) year. 



Q. How big is the Negro market? 
A. The Negro market i- bigger than 
\oii probabl) imagined. After all. one 
..lit of 10 Americans is Negro. In 
New V.ik alone there an- more than 
one million Negroes which exceeds 
the entire population of Pittsburgh, 
Boston, St. Louis or San Francisco. 




The Night the Stars Came Out 



If the stars came out only one night a year, what an audi- 
ence they would draw. And if WIBW broadcast only one day 
out of 365, what a rush there would be for availabilities. 

Fortunately for advertisers, WIBW is on the air every day 
from dawn to midnight. To the farm and small town folks 
who make up our audience, we're as dependable as the North 
Star . . . dependable in our services in their best interests. 

That's why WIBW consistently continues to be the sta- 
tion that Kansas farm folks listen to most — the station where 
RESULTS make it the first choice of sales-minded advertisers. 



7 to I 95 I, 




WIBW - CBS Radio, Topeka, Kansas 
Ben Ludy. Ccn. Mgr. WIBW - WIBW-TV and KCKN 



Classical music* 

Q. How popular is classical music? 

A. During \')S2 Hast \ear for which 
figures are available.) 30 million peo- 
ple paid $45 million in admissions to 
hear good music concerts in the U. S. 
I hat wa- fixe million more than the 
number of people who attended all 
major, minor and no-league base- 
hall nam.-. 

Surveys indicate the average income 
of people who listen to good music 
radio stations is S7.000 — double the 
national average. There are five lime- 
as many people earning $15,000 or 
more who listen to good musk stations 
than those who listen to other stations. 
Half of all good music listeners own 
their own homes i •)()'. of the non- 
apartment dwellers who listen to good 
music stations own their homes 



Q. Exactly how big is the good 

music radio audience? 

A. Good Music Broadcasters, Inc., 

reports that its 14 member stations 
have a total audience of more than 
two million people. In addition to 
these 14 stations, sponsor's Program 
Guide also lists 125 other stations pro- 
graming more than 10 hours weekly 
of good music. There are 922 stations 
i 01 ' i of the Guide's respondents I 
who program one or more hours week- 
lv of good music. The audience of 
these stations can only be conjectured. 



Q. What kind of sponsors use 
good music stations? 

A. Leading good music advertisers 
include Air France. Macmillan Co., 
RCA Victor I for its hi-fi equipment I . 
Holiday. Reader's Digest, Atlantic 
Monthly. Hukwa Tea. Cadillac. Buick. 
French Tourist Office and manv others. 



Folk music* 

Q. Do mostly hillbillies listen to 
folk music? 

A. According to Program Guide the 
majority of people like folk music 



220 



SPONSOR 



(sometimes called Western and hill- 
billy). For 65$ of the Program 
Guide respondents (995 radio sta- 
tions) reported folk music program- 
ing. There are at least 230 stations 
which schedule more than 20 hours 
weekly of folk music and at least seven 
outlets program nothing but folk 
music. These stations are not all high 
in the Ozarks, either. For example, 
WARL, Arlington, Va., a suburb of 
Washington. D. C, is a 100% folk 
music station serving the cosmopoli- 
tan, sophisticated capital city. One of 
the nation's best-known stations — 
WSM. Nashville — broadcasts 39 hours 
weekly of folk music. KXLA, Los An- 
geles and KVSM, San Mateo (a San 
Francisco suburb) are 100% folk- 
music programed. 



After-midnight radio 

Q. Who listens to the radio after 
midnight? 

A. Most people think factory work- 
ers on the graveyard shift are the only 
souls exposed to post-midnight radio. 
As American Airlines can testify, how- 
ever, a large group of white-collar 
workers also is up late. The airline 
has Music Till Dawn on six major 
stations (see "10 top case histories," 
page 45). The show is aired from mid- 
night to 5:00 or 5:30 a.m. on the out- 
let 1 ;, draws hundreds of letters weekly. 

There were 264 U. S. radio stations 
with post-midnight programing which 
responded to Program Guide question- 
naires. This represents about 18% of 
Program Guide respondents. 

About 5% of the respondents — 75 
stations — operate 24 hours a day. 

About 80% of the stations schedule 
pop music. Other programing includes 
chatter and interview, folk music, light 
classical and classical music. 



Religious and gospel 

Q. How many stations put on 
religious gospel shows? 

A. As might be expected, the Bible 
Belt contains the largest concentration 
of radio stations specializing in re- 
ligious and gospel programing. How- 
ever, such programing is not entirely 
confined to one area, for 54 f i of all 
Program Guide respondents feature 
some religious programing. About 100 



12 JULY 1954 



stations offer more than 10 boms of 
such programing weekly, of which 25 
are on Negro-appeal stations. Some 
stations program far more than 10 
hours weekly; KGFR, Los Anjzelo. 
carries more than 70 hours a week of 
religious programing. 



Foreign language 

Q. Is foreign-language program- 
ing still important to advertisers? 

A. At least 50 national ad\ertisers 



believe foreign-language programing 
is importanl enough to continue to al- 
ii" ate money for it. Ami more new 
sponsors are usiiij; lorcign laiifiuafii- 
programing all the time. * Vmong the 
recent entries: Italian Fines" pun-hax- 
of Travel Diary over WOV, New 
York. I 



Q. The foreign market is sharp- 
ly declining though, isn't it? 

A. Ten years ago a leading New 
York agency told its clients that "in 
a decade there will be no such thin"; 



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221 






.i- .i foreign-language market in tin- 
I . S." It based its prediction <>n limit- 
ed immigrant quotas and othei f ai • 
t « » i s. Now. howe\ ei . t ht- agem \ i^ 
telling clients thai "the foreign market 
continues to 1 »« - a vei j importanl fa< - 
tor in advertising." 



Q. But isn't the foreign market 
group — like everyone else — leav- 
ing its own neighborhoods in 
downtown areas and scattering to 
the suburbs of cities? 
A. Milton Guttenplan, vice president 



..I I mil Mogul Co., told SPONSOR tli;it 

there had been a trend to the Buburbs. 
"Bui tlii- most!) affects distribution 
<>f produ< t- t«>r these groups," he said. 
"'It ma) change distribution patterns. 
It doesn'l and won't affect radio ad- 
vertising; radio covers the Buburbs 
anyway. \nd radio continues to have 
entertainmenl appeal thai these groups 
Beek out and enjoj . 



Q. Where are the major foreign 

markets? 

A. \- a rule of thumb, chief foreign 



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WGR s Salesmen of the Air: 
JOHN LASCELLES 

the Morning "Musical Clock" Man 

Reggie and Bill K EATON 

Mr. and Mrs. Buffalo" 

BOB GLACY 

in "Glacy's Basement" Late Show 

BILL MAZER 

Sports As You Like Them 

HELEN NEVILLE 

The Homemaker's Friend 



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STATIONS THAT SERVE BOTH THEIR AUDIENCE AND THEIR ADVERTISERS 

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ON THE AIR 
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Headley-Reed - - Sati^nal Representatives 

I I 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY WGR CORPORATION 



markets are the older urban manufac- 
turing centers, sponsor's Program 
Guide listed 285 radio stations carry- 
ng foreign-language programing (not 
including Spanish; see separate para- 
graphs foi Spanish-American radio 
t\ I. This is nearlj 20' i of the total 
respondents to tin* Guide question- 
naires. Pennsylvania had 37 stations; 
California, 30; New York, 29; Michi- 
gan, 23: Massachusetts, 18, and Ohio 
17. The stations program to 31 differ- 
ent nationalities. 



Mexican-American 

Q. Are there two kinds of Span- 
ish-speaking groups? 

A. ^ es. One is made up of immi- 
grants largel) ; this is the Puerto 
Rkan {.'roup which centers in New 
^ • > ' k City. I In* othei segment is the 
Mexican group. 

The Dept. of Commerce and others 
consider the Mexican-American -.'roup 
at least 300 years old. And it's bi^: 
there are about three million Mexican- 
Americans throughout California. \ii- 
zona. New Mexico. Colorado and 
Texas. 



Q. How do individual markets 

rank? 

A. Richard O'Connell, New ^ ork 

station representative with a number 
of Mexican-American stations, com- 
piled Dept. of Commerce. Chamber of 
Commerce and Census figures, as well 
as reports from several other organi- 
zations, to arrive at this breakdown: 
Los Vngeles County, 550,000; San 
\nlonio. Tex., trading; area (includes 
1(1 surrounding counties), 400,000; 
the 65-mile strip of the Lower Rio 
Grande Valley, Harlingen. Browns- 
ville, 350,000; Corpus Christi trading 
area. 110,000 to 125,000; El Paso- 
Juarez trading area. lOO.Ooo; Houston 
trading area. 90,000; Laredo. Tex., 
trading area. 00.0(1(1: \ustin trading 
ana. 80.000: Albuquerque trading 
area, 80,000; Phoenix trading area. 
75,000 and Tucson trading area. 50,- 
ooo. The rest of the population is 
divided fairlj evenl) within the rural 
valleys ol South Texas, the Imperial 
\ allc\ and San Fernando Valle) (both 
California), along the rest of the 
Texas-Mexican border from Laredo 
northwest !<> El Paso. 



222 



SPONSOR 



Q. Do these Mexican-Americans 
have any program preferences? 

A. The Mexican- American's natural 
infatuation with music makes music 
the backbone of programing of any 
good Spanish station. According to 
Richard O'Connell. next in popularity 
"is the real blood-and-guts type soap 
opera which goes to much greater 
lengths in realism than do our Eng- 
lish soap operas. They, for instance, 
think nothing of having an illegitimate 
child in the script about to he born. 
However, due to their religious taboos, 
the child must either die at birth, the 
mother must die at birth, or, as rarely 
happens, the father must show up at 
the last minute and marry the mother. 
This is just one example of how real- 
istic Spanish soap operas can get . . ." 

I in radio 

Q. What is the outlook for fm? 

A. Veteran fm men say they have 
reason to be optimistic. They give 
three reasons: multiplexing, hi-fi. 
more fm sets. 

Q. What is multiplexing? 

A. It's a way of broadcasting two 
signals on the same channel. It en- 
ables part of an fm channel to be used 
for non-broadcast purposes while regu- 
lar fm "home" broadcasting continues. 
This squeezes more uses out of a single 
channel, gives fm more opportunities 
to make money. 

Example: While an fm station is 
broadcasting classical music to the 
home audience, it could also beam 
background music to restaurants and 
offices. The background music could 
be broadcast without interfering with 
the "home" broadcasting. A third ser- 
vice, music for stores, could also be 
broadcast simultaneously. 

At the Chicago NARTB Convention 
last May, FCC Commissioner George 
E. Sterling indicated that the new rule 
allowing stations to do multiplexing 
(officially known as FCC Docket No. 
10832) will soon be put into effect. 
He was careful to state that multiplex- 
ing would be an "adjunct to fm, not 
a replacement for it. . . . It may give 
fm the revitalization it needs." 

Q. Is hi-fi a factor for sponsors 
to consider? 

A. Virtually every big maker of elec- 
tronic gear is trying to cash in on the 
hi-fi market. Once confined to smaller 
firms, now RCA, GE, Philco. Zenith, 

12 JULY 1954 



Pilot and others are making a stum- 
pitch for hi-fi business. Henr) G. 

Baker, RCA vice president I home in- 
struments), says there will be "$300 
million spent on hi-fi equipment dur- 
ing 1954." 

This will affect fm. The majority of 
hi-fi rigs (ranging in price from $150 
to several thousand dollars I have an 
fm or fm-am tuner. "These hi-fi fan> 
aren't buying an fm tuner just to look 
at," one dealer told SPONSOR. 



Various fm stations have reported 
an upsurge in husinos from lii-fi deal- 
ers and record companies. 

Q. What sponsors should make 
an effort to reach hi-fi homes? 

A. Hi-fi is a great delight of the 
upper middle class. With a minimum 
investment of $150 required — and the 
average running around $500 to $800 
— it's obvious that hi-fi enthusiasts 
who listen mainly to fm constitute a 
quality market. Better automobiles, 




FABULOUS HOUSTON 
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M-DAY JULY 3, 1954 




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ASK THE WALKER REPRESENTATION CO., INC 



223 






travel and transportation firms, dis- 
tributors "I fine wines all these are 
"naturals. 



Q. Besides the hi-fi fm sets is 
fm set circulation growing? 
A. Not <>nl\ is the numbei ol Em 
sets manufactured steadil) i it not 
spe< 1,1. ill. ii K i iii< reasing, but also 
two new areas ol Em listening recently 
have been opened. Now j ou can buj 
both .mid radios u iili lin and portable 
radios w iili lm bands. 



WILDROOT 

i ( ontinued from page 1 1 1 

l!ill\ \\ illiams, now has his own 
group I . I he program was aired Mon- 
<la\ evenings, ran 15 minutes. 

I he ~li"\\ never ^>>i ofl the ground. 
It- average rating was 1 .8. I he sale 
ol \\ ildrool hail tonic did not surge. 

For six long years Wildrool aban- 
doned all plans foi extensive radio ad- 
vertising and turned to other media. 

B) late 1942 the memorj of W Lid- 
root's -.i<\ radio experience had laded. 



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Zone Slate 



W ildrool had j u>t brought out it> now- 
Famous Wildroot Cream OiL And 
Maurei had just written Id- '"Wildroot 
I ream Oil Charlie" jingle. After in- 
troducing Cream Oil in October and 
Novembei via Sundaj supplements, 
Maurer used Bpot radio on a market- 
by-market basis (at that time the 100- 
markets map bad nol Keen figured 

out i . \- BOOn as one market had been 

established, Wildroot began spot ra- 
dio in another area. 

I se ol Bpol radio increased year 1>\ 
yeai mini, during 1944, Wildroot was 
said to have Bpent more for spot than 
an) othei advertiser, [n those days, 
recalls Maurer, network radio was the 
big thing and it was unusual for a na- 
tional advertiser to use particularly 
heai \ spot campaigns. 

Despite his satisfaction with spot, b) 
1945 Maurer decided the firm was 
read) for network radio. It had been 
nine years -in<<- the compan) had been 
in network radio. 

The first show featured the Wood) 
Herman hand. A \ear later Wildroot 
-witi hed to Sam Spade. The private 
eye was sponsored b) Wildroot for 
four and a quarter years. 

\ I ii ml the same time, Wildroot 
bought the Kini: Cole Trio. This group 
was sponsored b) Cream Oil for a 
year and a hall. 

After droppin-j Sam Sjxide and the 
Trio. W ildroot picked up The Shadou 
and. later. Twenty Questions on MBS 
phi- Charlie It ild on radio and tv. It 
continued these network programs un- 
til 1953 when. Following completion of 
the 100-market breakdown and the 100 
different advertising budgets, Wildroot 
dropped network radio and put its en- 
lire > 1 . 1 million air budget into spot 

"You'll see that we had several cri- 
teria for network radio," Maurer ex- 
plains. '" Ml the -Imw- we sponsored 
we got just as the) were on their wa\ 
up in popularity. We kept them until 
the) reached their peak, then turned 
to new programs. 

" \ll the -how- had a young follow- 
ing as well a- an audience that had 
prett) good male listening. The) were 
aired at a time when we'd reach men 

both young men and older men. 
You see, we're serious about getting 
our message across to a young audi* 
ence. 

"You might -a\ we tr\ to catch 'em 
both on the wa\ up— both programs 

and kid-. 

Significant as hi- big colored map 



224 



SPONSOR 



and 100-hudget breakdown is to Man 
rer. they're not the most important ele- 
ments in Wildroot's advertising strat- 
egy- 

"Ideas are most important, lie ex- 
plains. "Exciting ideas, with the right 
kind of copy. Of course you need a 
good product to begin with. You've 
got to be honest. But aside from those 
basics, I believe ideas are most impor- 
tant." 

Maurer is himself an idea man. He 
doesn't leave all the creative thinking 
up to BBDO. "I have my own creative 
man, too, Earl Obermeyer. Good idea 
man, excellent writer. Earl, the agencj 
and I all work together on ideas." 

Possibly Maurer's most exciting ( he 
likes that word ) idea was his "Wild- 
root Cream Oil Charlie" jingle. 

When Maurer hears the jingle, he 
visualizes a couple of vaudevillians 
with their canes, striped trousers and 
straw hats a la the Happiness Boys. 

"For one thing that jingle is happy. 
And I believe it's important to have 
happy commercials. People like to be 
happy. They like to be associated 
with happy products. Our jingle sort 
of gives them a lift, makes 'em feel 
good." 

Every line of the jingle contributes 
to its selling message. "Take the first 
line — 'You'd better get Wildroot Cream 
Oil, Charlie'' — where you ask the lis- 
tener to act. The second line gives 
him the reason why — 'It keeps your 
hair in trim.' The next line tells more 
about the product — 'You see it's non- 
alcoholic. Charlie; it's made with 
soothing lanolin.' The next line re- 
peats the demand for action — 'You'd 
better get Wildroot Cream Oil, Char- 
lie; start using it today.' 

"We even throw in sex. The next 
line goes, 'You'll find that you ivill 
have a tough time, Charlie, keeping 
all those gals away.' And so it goes." 

This year's Wildroot campaign is 
centered around Al Capp's cartoon 
character, Fearless Fosdick. 

"Coming into 1954 we had, in ad- 
dition to the annual problem of where 
were we going to tell our story, the 
problem of what we were going to say. 

"What, besides our jingle, did we 
need? We needed some exciting way 
of dramatizing the jingle. We wanted 
a new way of getting the jingle to the 
public. 

"Having Fearless Fosdick is like 
having a Godfrey or Crosby — he's an 
audience getter, a salesman, a charac- 

12 JULY 1954 



ter that symbolizes Wildioot Cream 
Oil." 

Before definiteh signing with Capp, 
however, Maurer ran a split-run tesl 
in which Fearless and a conventional 
cartoon strip were used. Both cartoons 
were on the comics page. Both had 
the same position. 

When readership sur\e\s were 
made, the Capp cartoon outpulled the 
other strip by such a great extent that 
says Maurer. "we could do only one 
thing — hire Fearless Fosdick." 

I lir rompain's radio and tv com- 
mercials also feature Fearless Fos- 



dick, as well as point-of-sale material, 
sales letters to distributors and all the 
rest of \\ ildroot's advertising and mer- 
chandising. 

"I earless is our •iimniiek ilii- \ear," 
Maurer explains, "and we'll exploit 
him to the fullest extent." 

\\ hen it comes to giving people 
ideas, Maurer warms up to his theory 
that the advertising agency shouldn't 
be responsible for every new idea. 

"I believe we're BBDO's second old- 
est client. We started with Alex Os- 
born — the old Remington Agency 
(Buffalo), stayed with the merged 



How You jSro nna Keep'em 




1 KANSAS SHOWS 


1 18.6% 


MANUFACTURING, 


EMPLOYMENT GAIN /f 





YOU CAN'T WIN WITH THE 
RURAL VOTE ALONE ! ! 

Labor Department figures show Kansas tripled the national 
average and ranked fourth of all states in percentage of 
manufacturing employment gain in 52-53. Much of this 
growth is centered in WREN's backyard. You can no longer 
cover Kansas with a farm station alone. Bolster your sched- 
ule with WREN — top buy in Topeka and wealthy Eastern 
Kansas. 




5000 WATTS 



ABC 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 



225 



I 



Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn. 

"1 mil agenc) baa to be a partner in 
\ <>ii i business. You bave to tell the 
agenc) everything about your com- 
pany. Don't look upon the agenc) as 
an idea machine. It Bhould be \ < »n 1 
Belling partner. You're IniiIi in busi- 
nese to make money, Maurei <>l>- 
Berved. 

Maurei fia\c thi- description ol tin- 
W8) \\ ildroot work- with BBIM): 

"Our account executive i- Man I). 
Lehmann, who is assisted l>\ iwo as- 




REASONS WHY 

KOA's Western Market 

is the place to intensify 
k. your farm and ranch selling 
V right now! 



2. 



Income is higher through the 
year! Farm and ranch income 
in the Western Market 
is 74.3% higher than the 
national average! 



Bistanl account exe< utives Ja\ S. Lar- 

man and Stuart Hample; also a media 
director, \\ illiam Decker — all working 
out of BBDO's Buffalo office. Our New 
^ « » 1 k coordinator and Cal Friday is 
Gertrude Scanlan, and I think it would 
be -afe to say that a group of BBDO- 
ers— upward of 35 people Bpend all. 
or pcirt time, on the Wildroot account. 
"I sincerel) believe that the Wild- 
root Compan) and BBDO relationship 
is very unique. It is well over JO years 
old and we have never had another 



1. 



Income is at its peak! 

From now through the fall, 

harvest season means 

boom buying! 



3. 



Write today for 

complete details. . . 

or CALL PETRY! 



KOA serves the entire Western 
Market . . . more people who 
can't get TV than any 
radio station in America. 
This regular coverage 
includes 3,644,400 
listeners in 302 counties 
of 12 states! 



KOA programs for this 

market, with 18 hours 

a week devoted to 

FARM AND RANCH SERVICE! 




D E N VE 

Covers The West. . . ff&jtf'/ 

Dominant NBC Station — 50,000 Watts 



agency — which is certainly unusual in 
our kind of business. The Wildroot 
advertising department is relatively 
small for a firm with a $3,000,000- 
plus budget I sincerely believe that 
the reason for this is that we have 
always tried hard to avoid client-agen- 
cy duplication, and we use the agency 
for almost everything that the\ arc in 
a position to supply. 

"We do not look upon our agency 
as an idea shop, nor do we depend 
on them for all of the ideas and all 
creative suggestions. We think thej 
are a group o/ intelligent, sound lm-i- 
ne-ssmen. and they have our complete 
confidence. For example, at the last 
bi-monthly meeting which we had with 
the A. ('. Nielsen Co., there were as 
nianv agency people in attendance as 
there were Wildroot people. 

"You might he interested in know- 
ing that the agency is called into all 
of our planning at the very inception. 
They are active in all of our product 
testing, consumer testing and sales test- 
ing. Coming right down to the la>t 
foot, we feel that they share with us 
an\ successes or failures that we may 
have experienced." 

Maurei explained that Cream Oil 
was original!) a wartime substitute. 

"Our hair tonic, pre-World War II. 
had alcohol in it. like most tonics. 
Then our supply of alcohol was cut 
because of the war. Ever since 1 0.'-tT 
the lab had been working on a tonic 
with lanolin that was non-alcoholic. 
Actually it probably was better for 
\our hair. Of course some men liked 
the stimulation they got from the alco- 
hol tonics. But we had to sell the fact 
that because ours was non-alcoholic 
and contained lanolin — that was at a 
time when most people didn't know 
what lanolin was exactly — ours was 
better." 

Some observers told Wildroot the\ 
were making a mistake in bringing out 
an emulsion tonic. "Men wont put 
that white stuff on their hair." thej 
warned \\ ildroot. 

Maurer and Albert E. Ritchie, gen- 
eral sales manager for world opera- 
dons, started to test the Cream Oil in 
eight markets. 

They chose market- of L00,000 to 
250,000 population- big enough to 
• In . k results but not too big to be too 
expensive or to make personal chok- 
ing impossible. 

Maurei had charge of four markets, 
Ritchie had the other four. Each per- 



226 



SPONSOR 



sonally supervised careful sales tesls. 

"After nine weeks," Maurer told 
sponsor, "we were convinced that we 
had a winner in Cream Oil. And our 
'wartime substitute' has turned out to 
be a peacetime necessity." 

The Cream Oil is today so impor- 
tant to Wildroot that it gets virtually 
the entire Wildroot advertising bud- 
get, even though a wide variety of hair 
preparations and shampoos are pro- 
duced. "For one thing, the hair tonic 
industry is very susceptible to adver- 
tising." 

Working under Maurer is a staff of 
10. In addition to Earl Obermeyer. 
Maurer's "creative man." there is 
Chuck Dentinger, the advertising de- 
partment's media director, who handles 
the schedules, checking, billing details. 

Arthur Zgoda edits a weekly em- 
ployee newspaper I which has won two 
first prizes and a grand prize for the 
best publication entered in the Niagara 
Frontier Industrial Editors Association 
contest, judged by Northwestern Uni- 
versity's Medill School of Journalism). 
Zgoda also edits a biweekly salesman's 
newspaper, is the company photogra- 
pher, handles employee relations and 
does some public relations work. 

Maurer has been with Wildroot 25 
years; he has been advertising direc- 
tor since 1947 and was advertising 
manager the preceding five years. He's 
immediate past chairman of the Asso- 
ciation of National Advertisers, is on 
the ANA board and was a member of 
sponsor's Advisory Board for its All- 
Media Study, sponsor got the impres- 
sion, while spending a day with him. 
that he is given a free hand from Wild- 
root President Harry Lehman in run- 
ning the company's advertising pro- 
gram. Maurer started with Wildroot 
during a summer vacation while he 
was attending college, liked it so well 
he stayed with the company and never 
did finish school. Before coming into 
advertising he was a salesman. 

The original batch of Wildroot hair 
tonic was made by two Buffalo barbers 
who had been asked by their custom- 
ers for a dandruff-removing prepara- 
tion. The jug in which the first tonic 
was made in 1909 is in Wildroot's 
archives. 

sponsor asked Maurer why Wild- 
root had been so successful when there 
are several hundred brands of hair 
tonics on the market to chose from. 

"We have a good product, of 
course,"' said Maurer. "It costs more 



to make Cream Oil than other tonics. 

Hut besides .i ii I product, von need 

good selling to succeed. ^ on need In 
be research-minded. 

"We have two kinds of research. 
One, our laboratory upstairs with its 
stall of scientists. Two, our sales re- 
search. We copy test, sales test, con- 
sumer test. We're very cautious. 

"Cream Oil was successful. I think. 
for three reasons. 

"It was different; an emulsion. 

"It had exciting elements: it was 
non-alcoholic and had lanolin. 



'" I lie \\ ildrool < le.ini ( )il ( harlic 
jingle helped ^i\e the product a per- 
sonality . Personalit) i- impoi tant. 

\\ ildrool - chiel competitors are \ i- 

talis and \ aselinc. 

"One reason 1 believe Wildroot lia^ 
been so successful," Maurer said to 
sponsor, "is that we seriousl) believe 
ami practice an old adage. The sales 
department, the ad\ ei ti-iiiL: depart- 
ment, the agency — we all follow this 
adage: 'You can do an awful lot of 
good in this world — if you don't care 
who gets the credit'." * • * 




in 



the Rich NASSAU-SUFFOLK Market 



Within V 2 Millivolt Signal 

Retail Sales— $4,223,214,000* 

754,215 families with spendable 
income more than $4,000* 

382,826 families with spendable 
income more than $6,000* 

Within Nassau-Suffolk 
Saturation Area 

More retail sales than 18th 
ranking Metropolitan Market 
($1,200,175,000)* 

More food sales than 17 com- 
plete states or the District of 
Columbia ($364,062,000)* 



« 



' 740 kc c 

1000 WATTS 

379 NEW YORK AVENUE 
HUNTINGTON, L. 



TIMES TJE POWER Of JT_S 
NEAREST COMPETITOR . . . 

The Only Long Island Station 

That REALLY SATURATES 
The Market . . . 

W6SM— is first in morning audience** 

WGSM— has more afternoon listeners than 
the combined audience of 3 of 
the 4 New York networks** 

WGSM— is the independent with the low- 
est cost per listener in the largest 
"Home Owner" market in the 
world — Nassau - Suffolk - West- 
chester- Fairfield, and New Haven 
counties. 

WGSM— rates are bassd on local value . . . 
yet the advertiser receives a 
bonus coverage of over 5,000,000 
New York Metropolitan market 
dwellers— in Bronx, Queens, 
and Kings counties. 

Represented by 
Robert S. Keller Inc. 

*SRDS Consumer Markets (1954i "Hooper 



12 JULY 1954 



227 



WIUicA i s ^ 





r *illo sW 



PROPHET or PROFIT? 



Profit is the way WIP advertisers 
measure their results! 

That's why more local and national 
advertisers use WIP than any other 
Philadelphia network radio station.* 



MBS 




5000 WATTS 



PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 

i/Va//wa/ ffefitesenktwes 
EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



'Broadcast Advertisers Report 
May 1954 



PHILADELPHIA'S 



PIONEER 



V 



C E 



228 



SPONSOR 




1954: 117 MILLION RADIOS, 29 MILLION IN CARS 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the 11 pages of this report 

l| B How many U.S. homes are radio-equipped? page 1 

(| H How many ears in the U.S. have radios today? page 2 

|J a 11 hat type of radio is the public huying? page S 

U B How mueh does out-of-home audience add to in-home listening? page I 

|| a Hon- does the male vs. female radio audience compare? page 6 

l|. How many hours tlo homes listen per ilay? page 7 

U. Ho if do show types compare in number of people reached? page 8 

||. What's the eost-per-1,000 of network programs by types? page 9 

12 JULY 1954 229 



/ Dimensions of radio *s autlienee 




1. How many radios are there in the U.S. today compared with 1946? 



SOURCES: 1946 figure 



NAB for January: 1954 figure is NBC Rodio research dept. estimate 



Set until tlinthles in ii«(/n years 

Since 1946, first postwar year, total of U.S. 
radios has more than doubled. Sales of radios 
have been continuing at a fast pace through 
the years of television's most rapid growth. 



57,750,000 




1946 



1954 



2. What percent of U.S. homes have radio sets today? 

SOURCE: NBC Radio research dept. estimate for January 1954 




Homes with one or more radios 



lludio iimim iipiiriTMil mass medium 

Non-radio home is rarity. No other medium has 
as high a degree of penetration. NBC made its 
estimate on basis of 1953 Joint Radio Network 
Committee report updated by RETMA figures. 




Homes with no radios 



3. What percent of radio homes now have more than one radio set? 

SOURCE: "The Importance of Radio in Television Areas Today," survey by Alfred Politz Research for Henry I. Christal Co. and stations it 
represents; interviews span period 13 December 1952 to 29 January 1953 





23' have three 
to seven sets 



.■>.■>"„ homes multiple set 

Politi study covered tv areas. High 
proportion of homes with more than 
one radio points up importance of 
listening by individual members of 
families to radios at different loca- 
tions in homes. Chart on page 3 
of Radio Basics shows where radios 
are located within homes. 



B A D I BASICS 



/'"'/- i 



4. How many cars in the U.S. have radios today compared with 1946? 

SOURCE: 1946 figure from NAB, for January; 1954 figure is from merchandising publication Mart for January 



Car radios boomed up in postivar i/ear.v 

Since war's end number of cars equipped with radios has almost 
quadrupled. Total car radios now of over 29 million is close 
to number of U. S. tv homes. Though cars are main location 
for out-of-home listening, nation's 10 million portable radios 
and 10 million radios in public places also contribute substan- 
tially to audience. 





29,000,000 



1946 



1954 



5. How many radios were sold last year compared with the previous year? 



SOURCE: RETMA figures for factory sales to distributors, 1952 and 1953 



11,000,163 



1953 



12,938,455 



1954 



6. Do people buy radios in television areas? 

SOURCE: CBS Radio Spot Sales study based on RETMA home radio figures, BAB auto radio figure 

"S3 radio set sales lead '52 in 10 "aid" television markets 



f 


HOME SETS 


1953 

AUTO SETS 


TOTAL SETS 


New York. 


. .856,959.. .... 


361,666 


1,218,625 


Chicago 


.. .462,449. . 


236,939.. 


699,388 


Los Angeles 


...286,250... . 


...194,345 


480,590 


Philadelphia 


...268.522...... 


.146,214.. 


414,736 


Boston 


161,887. 


... 89,903 


251,790 


San Francisco 


137,224 


.... 83,062.. 


220,286 
172,984 
149,010 


St. Louis 


...-103,288.-. 


... 69,696... 
... 57,753 


Washington, D. C. 


... 91,257 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 


. 55,731 ... 


.... 45,466. 


101,197 

..... 20,921 J 


Salt Lake City 


..... 12,646 ... 


... 8.275... 



HOME SETS 



AUTO SETS 



TOTAL SETS 



Note that in these 10 mature television markets 
demand for radio sets shows acceleration in 
1953 over 1952. This is true when you consider 
home as well as auto sets. Importance of con- 



.737,833- 252,916 990,749 

314,472 .... . 175,872... 490,344. 

227,598 144,666 372,264 

214,613 106,217 .... 320,830 

142,559 . 67,450 210,009 

104,630..... 68,437... 173,067 

. 95,150 44,223 139,373. 

. 86,944 49,617 136,561 

. 52,720 39,019 91,739 

. 12,896 6,612 19,508 



tinued purchase of radio sets lies in obvious fact 
consumers are voting their continued interest in 
medium when they spend dollars for sets. Mar- 
kets above all had tv before freeze lifted in 1952. 

BAOIO %k%\%% | pages 



7. What type of radio is the American public buying nowadays? 



SOURCE: RfcTMA 1953 set sales f 



I i ri ii tf room rtnllos 33% 



Clock radios |«% 



rortable radios 13% 



Auto radios 38% 



2 o| .'»' radios iioii-Zirint/ room 

As figures at left show majority of radios now 
being bought are designed for use outside the 
living room. The present trend is a forerunner of 
what may be coming. The pocket radio, many 
electronics industry leaders feel, may be in mass- 
production within a few years. Portable radios 
may then become even larger portion of radio 
set sales than today. Total amount of listening 
by individuals should rise sharply. 



100% 



8. Where are radio sets located within U.S. homes? 

SOURCE: "The Importance of Radio in Television Areas Today," survey by Alfred Politz Research for Henry I. Chris'a Co. and 
it represents; interviews span period 13 December 1952 to 29 January 1953 



f.i.vf cuing perinea***.* I.S. fionic.v 

More sets today are found outside living 
room than in it. One reason: As television 
entered living rooms radios tended to be 
added in kitchens, bedrooms, other rooms 
where individual members of the family could 
use them without interfering with tv viewing. 
Spreading of radios all over home has made 
it more difficult for radio researchers to make 
full count of the radio audience. 



M_i 




9. How many people listen to radio in their homes every day? 






SOURCE: See footnotes below 



9 a.m. -noon 

*iuiuiiim:iiiir":iniimiiii!iii;!'i: :r'i ; : -mm! ■ ■ , N 

•■ ■■ ii i iiwioimiimmiii : in iiiiiiuiiiiiihiii^ 

noon 6 p.m. 



6 p.m. -midnight 



HOMES USING RADIO' 



LISTENERS 
PER SET- 



IU.it 7.tt.>0.000 I.IH 



17.1 



7,980,000 



1.27 



LISTENERS 
USING RADIO 



9.218.000 



f 0.130.000 



15.0 7,420,000 1.64 I2.1U4.000 






R A ! BASICS! pay, I 



N simple multiplication. 








than Stores in an 
Average of Five Other Leading Cities 



' On a per-store basis, retail stores in the 
city of Spokane ring up an average ot 
35.1 % more business than stores in the 
five cities leading the nation in population 
and in total retail sales. 



$1,137,685,00 MARKET 



Spokane < city > with only 17.8% of Spokane 
Market population accounts for 21.9% of 
etail sales. 



51.5% HIGHER than New York 

21.5% HIGHER than Chicago 

11.9% HIGHER than Los Angeles 

1.4% HIGHER than Detroit 

61.2% HIGHER than Philadelphia 



OPERATING ON 50,000 
WATTS 24 HOURS 
AROUND THE CLOCK 



(Only 50 kw between Min- 
neapolis and the Pacific 
Coast.) 



COVERAGE 

The vast Spokane market is a geo- 
graphically independent area. The 
nearest major city is located 300 
miles away. To reach all of the 
720.800 persons living within this 
market, you must beam your sales 
message out from Spokane at least 
150 miles. 

KCA's BONUS COVERAGE 

KCA rates are based on listene»*fiip 
of the radio families within its 
primary coverage area. The thou- 
sands of persons who listen nightly 
from San Francisco to northern 
Canada on KCA's clear channel sig- 
nal make up a KCA bonus audience 
that costs you nothing — means extra 
potential sales to you. 




SPOKANE 

WASHINGTON 



Keeps Getting Action 



^Source: Estimates based on "Sales Management" and U.S. Census figures 1949-53. 



12 JULY 1954 



233 



10. How much does the out-of-home audience add to in-home listening? 



SOURCE: The Pulse, Inc., Jan. -Feb. 1954 except New York which is only February 

f II-/lOIIM' 



On f -of -home- = This plus 1 



ATLANTA 

BALTIMORE 

BIRMINGHAM 

BOSTON 

BUFFALO 

CHICAGO 

CINCINNATI 

DETROIT 

HOUSTON 

LOS ANGELES 

MIAMI 

MILWAUKEE 

MINNEAPOLIS 

NEW YORK 

PHILADELPHIA 

PITTSBURGH 

RICHMOND 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ST. LOUIS 

SEATTLE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



■Afrrige quarter-hour lets-ln use of In home radio listening. 'Average quarter-hour 
leti-ln-uia of out-of-home radio listening. *The percent of listening added by out- 




18.7% 
21.2% 
18.0% 
22.6% 
20.7% 
21.4% 
21.4% 
22.7% 
17.4% 
22.7% 
14.5% 
18.2% 
18.4% 
23.9% 
22.9% 
18.2% 

17.6% 
20.9% 
19.3% 
15.8% 
19.8% 



of home. (This Is derived by calculating the tatlo of out-of-home to In-home listening) 
All figures in this chart cover 6 a.m. through midnight. Sunday through Saturday. 



11. Who listens to radio out-of-home and where do they listen? 

SOURCE: The Pulse, Inc., August 1953, New York market 24-hour period 



NO O-O-H DID LISTEN 



DID LISTEN 



BY ACE CROUP 



BY SEX 



I 

i 



5-13 


. . 14.5 <£. . 


. .6.1% 






14-19 


...7.8%. 


12.0% 


20-34 


. .23.2%. 


.31.3% 


35-44 


. .14.5%. 


.24.3% 


45-64 


. .29.»%. 


22.2% 


65 A. over . 


. .10.2%. 


.4.1% 


Hale 


100.0% . 
. .42.3%. 


100.0% 

.5.9.1% 




. .57.7%. 


1 «..•>»„ 



BY PLACE 



100.0% JOO.0% 





« 1 .« "„ 


Work 


25.5% 


Visiting .... 


14.1% 




.5.0% 


Restaurants . 


. .3.9% 


Retail Shops 


. .6.3% 


Schools, etc. . 


. .1.0% 


IJ7.6%* 



B A f BASICS I pagt i 



*Mulll[ .' 







HERE'S 


WHAT 


YOU 


GET! 








Share of 




Sett-ln- 




Total 


Time 


Use 


Rating 


Audience 


Monday 










7:00 AM 


29.6 


12.2 


41% 




8:00 AM 


33.6 


9.4 


28% 




9:00 AM 


30.8 


8.0 


26% 


10:00 AM 


28.6 


7.9 


28% 


11:00 AM 


29.1 


7.1 


24% 


1:00 PM 


29.0 


9.8 


34% 


3:00 PM 


23.3 


9.2 


40% 


6:00 PM 


20.5 


7.7 


38% 


7:00 PM 


30.7 


10.9 


36% 


9:00 PM 


25.7 


10.8 


42% 


(10) Average 


28.1 


9.3 


34% 


Tuesday 








6:30 AM 


16.7 


7.9 


47% 


8:30 AM 


33.2 


8.8 


27% 


10:30 AM 


29.2 


7.5 


26% 


11:30 AM 


27.3 


7.3 


27% 


2:30 PM 


26.2 


8.6 


33% 


4:00 PM 


23.5 


8.6 


37% 


5:30 PM 


24.9 


9.3 


37% 


7:30 PM 


32.1 


12.0 


37% 


9:30 PM 


23.6 


9.4 


40% 


10:00 PM 


21.8 


9.5 


42% 


(10) Average 


25.9 


8.9 


35% 


Wednesday 








7:45 AM 


30.7 


10.2 


33% 


9:45 AM 


31.0 


7.9 


25% 


10:45 AM 


28.3 


7.2 


25% 


11:45 AM 
1:45 PM 


28.1 


7.6 


27% 


27.7 


8.6 


31% 


3:45 PM 


23.6 


8.7 


37% 


4:45 PM 
6:45 PM 


23.6 


7.9 


33% 


28.6 


10.8 


38% 


8:45 PM 


27.8 


10.8 


39% 


10:30 PM 
(10) Average 


15.6 


7.6 


48% 


26.5 


8.7 


347c 


Thursday 








7:15 AM 


32.5 


12.6 


39% 


f 9:15 AM 
' 10:30 AM 


30.5 


7.5 


25% 


29.2 


7.5 


26% 


11:30 AM 


27.3 


7.3 


27% 


12:30 PM 


33.1 


11.5 


35% 


3:30 PM 


23.5 


8.8 


37% 


5:00 PM 


20.5 


7.7 


38% 


7:15 PM 


30.7 


10.5 


34% 


8:15 PM 


30.0 


12.1 


40% 


9:45 PM 


21.9 


8.4 


38% 


(10) Average 


27.9 


9.4 


34% 




'rlday 










6:15 AM 


14.3 


7.1 


50% 




9:00 AM 


30.8 


8.0 


26% 




10:15 AM 


27.5 


7.4 


27% 




11:15 AM 


27.1 


7.0 


26% 




1:15 PM 


29.2 


9.0 


31% 


3:00 PM 


23.3 


9.2 


40% 




4:15 PM 


23.6 


8.5 


36% 




7:15 PM 


30.7 


10.5 


34% 




8:45 PM 


27.8 


10.8 


39% 




9:45 PM 


21.9 


8.4 


38% 




(10) Average 


2S.6 


8.6 


35% 




aturday 










8:15 AM 


31.0 


7.8 


25% 




9:30 AM 


26.3 


7.0 


27% 


10:15 AM 


23.8 


6.8 


28% 




11:00 AM 


20.3 


5.3 


26% 




11:45 AM 


23.0 


5.0 


22% 




(5) Average 


24.9 


6.4 


26% 



IS 



ON POWERHOUSE 

Radio WOW 

a ferritin buy I 

LARGEST AUDIENCE 

LOWEST COST! 
Compare the Ratings: 

Total spots 55 

Sets-In-Use (Average per spot) 29.4% 

RATINGS: 

WOW — Area Rating (Average per spot) 9.3 

Station "B" (Same times) 5.1 

Station "C" (37 Daytime, same times) 3.0 

Share of Total Audience: 

WOW— (Average 55 spots) 36% 

Station "B" — (Average 55 spots, same time) 18.5% 

Station "C" (37 Daytime, same spots) 11.0% 

Comparative End-Rates: 

8-Sec Cbs Minutes 

WOW $6.50 $18.00 $22.00 

"A" Station 7.00 14.00 14.00 
"B" Station 5.68 11.35 11.35 

Compare the Costs: 

Cost -Per 1000 In-Home families: 
Base SAM. -Day Base B-Day Base C-Day 

WOW 389,809 425,390 

"A" Station 293,125 321,520 

"B" Station 147,410 201,210 

8 -Sec: 

WOW 18c 16c 14c 

"A" Station 47c 43c 

"B" Station 1.28 94c 

Chainbreaks: 

WOW 49c 45c 39c 

"B" Station 94c 85c 

"C" Station 2.56 1.88 

Minutes: 

WOW 60c 56c 47c 

"B" Station 94c 85c 

"C" Station 2.56 1.88 

Sources: 

Sets in use. ratings, shares are from the Pulse of the WOW Area. March. 
1954. 

Rates are from the March. 1954 Standard Rate & Data, or (for shorties) 
quoted by Station Managers. 3/28/54. 

C-P-M computed using total weekly base (as indicated) times WOW Pulse 
Area rating divided into rate. 

REGIONAL RADIO 




OMAHA, NEBRASKA 

Bill Wiseman, Sales Manager 

NBC Aff. • 590 KC • 5000 WATTS 

JOHN BLAIR & CO., REP. 

A MEREDITH STATION • Affiliated with Better Homes and 
Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



MM Ki<ulii> listening ha 




1. How does the number of people listening in homes differ hour by hour? 

SOURCE: The Pulse, lr, 

Total radio listeners per 1.000 homes with radios: it p.m. If on. -Fri. is /»»«//« point 



400 






MON.-FRI. 1 


~ SATURDAY 


i i 


SUNDAY 












r- 1 




350 




|-| 


- 












300 






-i 


ll iW 


n 


n 






















250 




- 


-i 




























200 




-| 


-i 


























_ 


150 _ 




-I 






























- 


100 








































1 





































400 



350 



300 



250 



200 



150 



]00 



50 



HOUR 
BEGINNING 6 AM 



10 



PM 



9 10 II 



# * * 




floir vhttrt ttboce is computed: it is result of sets-in-use 



multiplied by listeners* aires true measure of audience 



The chart above gives a true measure of the relative size of the 
in-home radio audience at any time. It is derived by multiplying 
the sets-in-use figure for each hour by the number of listeners 
per radio set. The number of listeners per 1,000 radio homes 
figure thus obtained shows how the number of people actually 
listening fluctuates hour by hour. The Pulse figures used to derive 
these audience totals are 12-city averages for the following tv 
markets: Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, Los 
Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New York, Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland, St. Louis. Washington, D. C. The high point in 
audience falls at 8 p.m. Monday through Friday when there are 
394 listeners per 1,000 radio homes. Low point is Sunday at 6 a.m. 
when there are only 18 listeners per 1,000 radio homes. Radio 
homes, by the way, are not "radio-only" homes: they are "homes with 



radios' which means virtually all homes in a market and includes of 
course homes which have television. With this chart the advertiser 
interested in reaching the broadest number of people can easily 
tick off the hours with the highest potential. The chart shows, for 
example, that the morning hours starting at 7 and at 8 have a two- 
hour average of 349 people listening per 1,000 radio homes. But the 
hours starting at 7 and 8 in the evening have an average of 384 
people. Actually sets-in-use for the evening hours Is slightly lower 
than for the morning. But this is more than over-balanced by the 
increase in number of people listening per home in the evening. On 
the next page you'll find two charts similar to the one above which 
break the total audience down by =ex. The principle used in deriving 
these charts is identical to the one explained above. Total here in- 
cludes teenagers and children. 



n « U i ■> 



;-} I <■ 



I ■'■ : ','■ '■■ f 

A S I U S /""/' ' 



HOW MANY EARS HEAR 
THE VOICE OF BALTIMORE? 



Some smart guy came up with a quick 
answer: "Twice as many ears as 
people!" 

But it's not quite that simple! For in- 
stance, back in 1922 when WCAO first 
went on the air, there were 880,000 
people in Metropolitan Baltimore. 
They all had ears — but they didn't all 
have radio sets. Right now there are 
1,455,000* people in Metropolitan 
Baltimore — and it would be mighty 
hard to find a pair of ears that didn't 
listen to radio. 

PULSE OF BALTIMORE tells us 
that WCAO is the most listened-to 
station in Baltimore. So that's that. 
But, WCAO's 5,000 watt signal goes 
a long way beyond Metropolitan 



27th Anniversary 
of affiliation with 
CBS as a basic 
radio station 




Baltimore. Our mail map shows 
extremely widespread listenership 
beyond the limits of Metropolitan 
Baltimore. 

And Baltimore's wealth is increasing 
faster than Baltimore's "ears". In 
1922, Baltimore's spending power was 
reflected by retail sales of $325,000,000. 
In 1927 (when we joined the CBS net- 
work) retail sales were $395,000,000. 
And, in 1953, Baltimore retail sales 
reached a whopping $1,543,684,000*. 

In other words, about twice as many 
people are spending nearly five times 
as much money! And, most of those 
1,455,000 (plus) pairs of ears listen 
to the "Voice of Baltimore". 

* 1954 Survey of Buying Power 

WCAO 



All programming is simulcast by WCAO-FM (20,000 warts) at no additional cost to advertisers 



CBS BASIC • 5000 WATTS • 600 KC • REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



I2 JULY 1954 



237 



2. How does audience composition (men vs. women) vary by hour of the day? 

SOURCE: The Pulse. Inc. study for The Katj Agency, winter 1953 

Women radio listeners per 1,006 homes with radios: 10 a.m. Woii.-I ri. is high point 



MON.-FRI. L 



3 SATURDAY C 



3 SUNDAY 



250 



200 



150 




100 



250 



200 




BEGINNING 6AM 7 



9 10 I I 12 I PM 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 



# * # 

Wen radio li.sl«»jic»r.v pc»r f.000 homes with radios: it p.m. ?Ion.-Fri. is high point 

•tON.-FRI. I "1 SATURDAY I ~1 SUNDAY 









150 



100 




beginning 6 AM 7 8 9 10 II 12 I PM 2 



9 10 II 



The charts above are based on the principle explained on the im- 
mediately preceding Radio Basics page. They show you the total 
number of people of each sex per 1,000 radio homes listening each 
hour. This does not include teenagers or children. Women listeners 
are most plentiful at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. The biggest 
male audience is in the evening, 8 p.m. Monday through Friday. 
Hour by hour, the chart shows, more women listen to radio at home 
than men, except at I I p.m. when the male audience is larger for 
every day of the week. Another interesting fact shown by the 
chart is that the advertiser who wants to reach a big male audi- 
ence in the morning has his best chance of doing so during one 
hour only, 7 through 8 a.m. In the evenir.g the advertiser can reach 



a high male audience for the four hours starting 7 through 10 p.m. 
On the weekends presence of more men in the audience helps to 
balance lower female listening levels. Another factor in large Sat- 
urday morning audiences is addition of children and teenagers. 
Saturday morning listening at hours starting iO, II and 12 in morning 
are almost level with Monday through Friday audience. The male 
audience is up an average of 32 men per 1,000 homes during those 
hours and the number of teenagers and children in the audience 
goes up to the same degree. The children-teenagers average 31.6 
per 1,000 homes Monday through Friday at these hours, rise to 62 
per 1,000 on Saturday. (These figures derived by subtracting totalt 
shown on previous page from total of men and women on this page.) 



ft U I u 






page 6 



Sponsors buy 
by-the-year 

on WOWO! 



National and local clients sell BIG 
on WOWO . . . morning, noon and 
night . . . fifty-two weeks of the 
year! So they buy fifty-two weeks of 
the year! You'll never get a better 
buy in this high buying-income 
Ohio-Indiana-Michigan market. 
Buy us and see! 



For information about best buys 
and frequency discounts, call H. D. 
"Tommy" Longsworth, WOWO 
Sales Manager, Fort Wayne, 
Anthony 2136, or Eldon Campbell, 
WBC National Sales Manager, 
PLaza 1-2700, New York. 



A/ESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



WOWO, Fort Wayne; WBZ-WBZA • WBZ-TV, 
Boston; KYW • WPTZ (T V), Philadelphia; 
KDKA, Pittsburgh; KEX, Portland, Oregon 

National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc 
444 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 

2 JULY 1954 



WITNESS: 

NEW 52-WEEK CONTRACTS 

5:45-6:00 a.m. 
Tuesday, Thursday 
Keystone Steel & Wire 
(Red Brand Fence) 

6:00-6:15 a.m. 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 

Ralston- Purina Company 

7:20-7:25 a.m. 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 

Funk Brothers Hybrid Seed Corn 

8:00-8:15 a.m. 
Tuesday, Thursday 
Parrott Packing Company 

11:00-11:15 A.M. 
Monday through Friday 
Procter & Gamble (Cheer) 

12:45-12:55 p.m. 
Wednesday, Friday 
DeKalb Agriculture 

10:30-11:00 p.m. 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 

Falstaff Beer 



WOWO 

Fort Wayne, Indiana NBC Affiliate 
50,000 WATTS 



239 



3. How many hours do homes listen per day? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co >53-April 1954 

\veraye total hours of radio use per home per day* 



2.83 


2.69 


2.37 


2.25 


2.28 


2.51 


2.63 


2.78 


2.73 


2.78 


2.69 


2.84 


2.56 
















-- 
















APRIL 



MAY JUNE JULY 



AUG. 



SEPT. OCT. 



NOV. 



DEC. 



1953 

mi above bIiows ni hours} thai 

- Ilo during the 



JAN. 



FEB. MARCH APRIL 



i til 1953 through April 1 S'ote that ll N en- measured ratio audi- 

■ >umracrtime slump, rising Bgall - high iwint 



4. How much radio listening do tv homes contribute? 

SOURCE: Pulse study for the Katz Agency based on Jan. -Feb. 1953 Pulse reports 



Radio sets-Ill-use in (r homes eompured irilli fill homes 

PERCENT OF RADIO HOMES WITH RADIO SETSIN-USE '4 HOUR AVERAGES BETWEEN 8 PM AND 10 PM 



Birmingham 

It os 1 on 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Los .\iij»Vl«»s 

>l iiim-.ipolis-S,. Paul 

\c» York 

Philadelphia 

San I iMiiciscM 

St. Louis 

Washington 



°„TV 
OWNERSHIP 



1-1.0', 

71.6 
69.5 

71.8 
73.0 

72.;; 

(.(..7 
73.2 
76.0 
47.9 

7n. ( ) 



12-t'iiy Average I 07.1 
RADIO BASICS page? 



MON.-FRI. SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 



IN TV HOMES IN ALL HOMES IN TV HOMES IN ALL HOMES IN TV HOMES IN ALL HOMES 



16.9 
16.9 
17.1 
15.9 
16.2 
18.5 
17.5 
17.1 
17.7 
17.7 
16.6 
17.5 



17.1 



23.1 
21.1 
19.3 
L8.4 
L9.1 

20.4 
20.4 
L8.0 
24.0 
L9.9 
21.3 



20.8 



15.2 
16.4 
14.7 
17.2 
15.2 
17.7 
15.4 
16.3 
15.8 
16.5 
15.1 
14.9 



15.9 



L8.5 
22.1 
18.2 
18.9 
L8.1 
22.0 
L9.9 
L9.9 
L6.9 
24.0 
17.7 
L8.7 



19.6 



15.2 


18.1 


16.5 


20.1 


17.2 


18.4 


14.2 


L6.6 


1 5.0 


17.7 


16.8 


22.7 


14.4 


21.1 


15.9 


19.3 


16.6 


18.6 


16.2 


21.7 


15.6 


19.0 


16.3 


19.8 



15.8 



19.4 



USE THE BIG GUN! 






when you want the people 
of Southern California to get 
your Sales Message 





"O-O-H"* A' BOOM" WITH A BONUS! 

™^ nt Pulse Re P° rt (Feb. 1954) shows that 
KMPC dominates Southern California's 
* out-of-home audience: 

KMPC tops ALL Los Angeles stations, except one 
network outlet, in total O-O-H ratings. 

KMPC, except for just one network outlet, has a 
larger O-O-H audience than any other Los Angeles 
station — including the networks! 
A 1953 survey estimates 2,804,196 automobile 
radios for O-O-H listening in Southern California. 
KMPC reaches them ALL ! 

KMPC The One-Station Network 
You could buy 38 stations in this area and still 
not get this great KMPC coverage. 

KMPC IS A 24-HOUR STATION 




RMPC 



710 kc, Los Angeles 



GENE AUTRY, President • R. O. REYNOLDS, Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 

Represented Nationally by A. M. Radio Sales Company 
NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES • CHICAGO 



"2 JULY 1954 



241 



5. How do network radio program types compare in number of people reached? 



SOURCE: Home base, A. C. Nielsen Co.; listeners-per-tet, The Pulse, Inc. 

\reraye >ni in f»cr of people reached by program types. 7-I.'J Feb. 1954 

ONCEA WEEK EVENING (IS minutes or more duration) 



SITUATION COMEDY 



GENERAL DRAMA 



MYSTERY DRAMA 



CONCERT MUSIC 




4,757,892 



4,202,805 



POPULAR MUSIC 



VARIETY MUSIC 



VARIETY COMEDY 



OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 



3,647,717 




8,009,118 



4,678,594 



MULTI-WEEKLY DAYTIME 



ADULT SERIALS 



CHILD PROGRAMS 



OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 




3,092,630 



2,486,232 



2,183,032 



Chan above Is ba*ed on A. C. Nielsen Co figures for number of 
radio BOMBS leached by various basic network ra'llo program 
types, multiplied by Pulse estimate of 1.3 prrsons-per-radlo-set 
during the daytime (8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.) and 17 pertoos- 
per-set In the evening (6:00 p.m. to midnight). Pulse average 
is for the entire V s 



J'i 



6. How many homes are added to the radio audience by turnover? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. study 

Different homes reached by radio programs grow rapidly in month 







, HOMES REACHED 

1 WEEK 4 WEEKS 


' 


(Sod 


freu's Talent Scouts 
Lux Theatre 
>lr. A. Mrs. \orth 
Our Miss Hroohs , 

Red Skeleton 

Ron Itttaers i 
\veraqe < 


\ 3,Qr.l 


HMH.l 




! 3,469 


10.160 
7,38.1 




! 4,767 


9.3M 




! 2,350 
! 2.117 


6,132 

6.0 12 




! 3.701 


7.0.T2 



4-WCEK AUDIENCE 
TURNOVER 



2.19 

1.93 
2.13 

1.95 
2.61 



2.49 

2.15 



RADIO BASICS J w« « 




Go BIG GAME 
HUNTING 

inT&KOA. 



There's big game in the Southwest's biggest, richest 
market . . . you'll bag the sales limit easily when you load up with a sure-fire 

WFAA-formulated program or adjacency — proved to have the 
largest audiences over any other local or network programs 
broadcast at their time in the Southwest. 



WFAA-820 MARKET 



Population 4,566,600 

Families 1,369,900 

Effective Buying Income . . $6,411,105,000 

Retail Sales 4,780,421,000 

Food Sales 1,033,675,000 

General Merchandise . . . 616,534,000 

Furniture, Household, Radio . 227,534,000 

Drug Sales 146,955,000 

Automotive Sales .... 1,186,435,000 



WFAA-570 MARKET 



Population 2,382,000 

Families 738,500 

Effective Buying Income . . $3,607,175,000 
Retail Sales 2,655,695,000 



Food Sales 

General Merchandise . 
Furniture, Household, Radio 

Drug Sales 

Automotive Sales 



562,266,000 
417,570,000 
126,306,000 
82,767,000 
608,298,000 



(SOURCE SM, May 10. 1954 — 25% 100% coverage area. SAMS: Spring, 1952) 




ALEX KEESE, Station Manager 

EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY • Natl. Rep. 



RADIO SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



2 JULY 1954 



243 



Mil Cast of radio advertising 



1. What's the cost-per- 1,000 homes of network programs by types? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. NRI Reports 7-13 February 1954 
ONCE-A-WEEK (25 minutet or marc duration) 

SITUATION COMEDY 

GENERAL DRAMA 

MYSTERY DRAMA 

CONCERT MUSIC 

POPULAR MUSIC 

VARIETY MUSIC 

VARIETY COMEDY 

OUIZ. & AUD. PARTIC. 



$5.99 (6.0 rating) 
2,798,760 homes 



$6.93 (4.9 rating) 
2,285,654 homes 



$6.81 (5.3 rating) 
2,472,238 homes 




$6.86 (5.6 rating) 
2,612,176 homes 



$8.24 (10.1 rating) 
4.71 1,246 homes 



$4.72 (5.9 rating) 
2.752,1 14 homes 



MULT I WEEKLY DAYTIME 

ADULT SERIALS 

KID PROGRAMS 

OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 




$1.88 (5.1 rating) 
2,378,946 homes 



$2.92 (4.1 rating) 
1,912,486 homes 

$2.85 (3.6 rating) 
1,679,256 homes 



NOTE: These cost-per- 1 ,000 figures are 
most useful as a comparative yardstick 
of the program types. They are not an 
up-to-date index of actual network costs 
next season because the recent increase 
in network discounts will tend to brmq 
down cost-per- 1 ,000. 



2, What are some typical talent-production costs for network radio shows?* 

SOURCE: Network Radio Comparagraph which appears in alternate iss-ies of SPONSOR. These represen* 53-54 season p.- : ces 

If »fE.\CE P\RTICIPAT10\ 



111 .STEfCV-CKf HE HIU'll 



The Shadow (perpartic). 

Dragnet 

Nick Carter 

Johnny Dollar 

Mystery Theatre 

Big Story 

Suspense 

The Falcon (per partic). 
Squad Room (per partic) 
Mr, & Mrs, North 



$2,100 
$5,500 
$1,850 
$3,400 
$2,000 
$6,000 
$5,000 
$1,500 
$1,500 
$4,500 



situations rom im 

Our Miss Brooks $6,500 

Amos V Andy $15,000 



My Little Margie $3,750 

Harris-Faye $10,000 

Meet Mr. McNutley $3,500 

Fibber McGee (per partic) $2,917 

My Friend Irma $5,000 

Ozzie & Harriet $7,500 



GENERAL IMC 111 \ 



Hallmark Theatre $4,000 

Stars Over Hollywood. .. . $4,000 

Gunsmoke $2,875 

City Hospital $2,500 

Time for Love $3,000 

Lux Radio Theatre $12,000 



Ul figure* refi DO more than once ■ wr«h 



You Bet Your Life $7,500 

Truth or Consequences . . . $5,000 

House Party $6,000 

Welcome Travelers $4,000 

Walk a Mile $3,500 

People Are Funny $4,000 

SERIAL l»IC HI I 



Rosemary $2,700 

Ma Perkins $3,250 

Perry Mason $3,500 

Road of Life $3,250 

Pepper Young $2,700 

Backstage Wife $2,500 

Stella Dallas $2,800 

'This 'hurt continues next jiape) 



RAO 10 BASICS >><"J< 9 



, BIG MIKE... 

the butter £ egg man 



kSS 





■ 



■ 



to 



Big Mike points out that Omaha, Nebraska's 
largest city, is number one in the nation for 

above its nearest 



competitor. Big as it is (25-30 million pounds 
a year) butter is only part of Nebraska's food 
processing story. Rankin g second in the na- 
tion for ALL food processin g Omaha's poultry 
products, processed in five plants, range from 
dressed birds to dehydrated eggs. Omaha 
meat packers process nearly six million head 
of livestock in a typical year. 

Nebraska's food processing story is a mighty 
big story . . . and it's getting bigger and better 
every year. As the market grows, so grows 
Big Mike . . . with more listeners, more service 
. . . more success stories to tell you about. Free 
& Peters will be glad to give you the facts . . . 
So will Harry Burke, General Manager. 



v v\\\\\l //-/•/ 



Big Mike is the physical trademark of KFAB 
Nebraska's most listened-to-station 







SCItl M. Dlt l>l » (cont.) 

Lorenzo Jones $2,750 

Right to Happiness $3,000 

CO\t MCI Ml SIC 

Voice of Firestone- $18,000 

Railroad Hour $6,000 

Telephone Hour $8,000 

Band of America $6,500 

lu.ur 



I'OI'I LMt Ml sit 



Perry Como (tape) . 

Dinah Shore 

Eddie Fisher (tape) 
Julius La Rosa . . . 
Grand Ole Opry 



$1,100 
$5,000 
$1,000 
$1,750 
$5,000 



\ 1ICIITV COMEDY 



Bing Crosby $15,000 



Gene Autry $9,500 

Jack Benny $16,000 

Bergen-McCarthy $12,000 

\EWS AJVD COM ME/VT 4ft V 

Walter Winchell* $17,500 

Morgan Beatty $2,500 

Frank Edwards $1,750 

Gabriel Hearten- $1,500 

Lowell Thomas $7,650 

Alex Dreier $1,500 



3. What can you buy with various typical ad budgets in spot radio? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR calculations based on "Spot Radio Estimator" of Station Representatives Association 



PROBLEM 



BUDGET 



CAMPAIGN 



r 



-\ 



Advertiser wants intensive 

short-term promotion to 

reach women in markets of 

over 500,000 population 



Idvertiser wants year-round 
schedule of 15-minute news- 
easts to reach mixed audi- 
ence in markets of 100,000 
up to 250.000 population 



Idvertiser wants steady. 

52-week campaign of minute 

announcements in as many 

markets as possible over 

25,000 population 



I Sponsor mill 

| $100,000 I 

to spend 

I I 

I 1 

I 1 

I 

Sponsor tcith 

I $600,000 



to spend 



I 

Sponsor with 

I $1,200,000 



I 



J 



to spend 






► 



L 



J 



A single daytime minute announce- 
ment on one neticork affiliate in 
each of the 38 markets of this 
size ivill cost a total of about 
$1,116. Therefore, tcith discounts, 
the $100,000 budget buys about 
16 announcements per week on one 
station in each of these top 38 
markets for six weeks, daytime. 



On highest-priced station in each 
of 78 such markets, newscast campaign 
comes to about $2,863 for one time. 
A thrice-iceekly schedule on year- 
''round basis would be about 
$446,628. For extra impact campaign 
could be expanded to one inde- 
pemlent station in 56 markets 
of the 78. This would mean an extra 
$200,000. Campaign would then cost 
a total of about $600,000. 

Since a single minute announcement 
on one network affiliate station 
in each of 291 markets of this 
size (of a U.S. total of 313) 
comes to about $3,085, the budget 
of $1,200,000 will buy about 500 
announcements on each of the 291 
outlets. Spread out over a year, 
this will mean about 10 announce- 
ments per week on each of 291 
stations in markets of 25.000 
population or more. 



REPItlYTS OF RADIO BASICS are available on request. Special price for quantity orders 






n >■■ U 



I ■■■:■ i p e 



page 10 



Higher Tower, f Higher Power 



Tower 

Power 

Households 

Farm Households 

Tv Homes 

Retail Sales 

Farm Income 

Food Store Sales 

Drug Store Sales 

Counties Covered 



For topnotch national and local 

programming, topnotch facilities, 

topnotch signal and a topnotch market, 

see WFBM-TV. 

* Data, based on Nov. Nielsen, 

compares new coverage area 

with coverage prior to 

power-tower increase. 



add 12,000 sq. mile 
coverage area 



UP Now 1019 feet 

UP Now 100,000 watts 

UP 76.1%* 

UP 147.3% 

UP 59.5% 

UP 71.8% 

UP 141.1% 

UP 74.3% 

UP 20.3% 

UP 122.2% 



4 



■ • ■ 









% 



ft? \ 



Indianapoli* 



N-p* 



'P*«««« 



WFBM-TV 

Indianapolis • CBS 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 
Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM & TV. Grand Rapids 

12 JULY 1954 



"ST- 



■ 







247 




MV Radioes bit tings 



1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net radio 49-54? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



NETWORK 







1949 



$42,342,854 



$63,403,583 



$18,040,596 



$64,013,296 



1950 



$35,124,624 



$70,744,669 



$16,091,977 



$61,397,650 



I95I 



$33,708,846 



$68,784,773 



$17,900,958 



$54,324,017 



I952 



$35,023,033 



$59,511,209 



$20,992,109 



$47,927,115 



I953 



$29,826,123 



$62,381,207 



$23,176,137 



$45,151,077 



1 954 
First 4 Months 



$10,457,574 



$20,416,980 



$7,598,134 



$13,170,839 



YEARLY TOTALS 




11930} 


$27,694,090 


s 


$49,293,901 


fmol 


$96,455,603 




7Wi 




'msj 




$198,995,742 

$187,800,329 
$183,358,920 




M Si I $174,718,594 



[19521 $163,453,466 
fJ953) 



$160,534,544 



- 



2. How much money have advertisers spent for spot radio time ('47-54)? 



SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates 




1947 
$98,581,241 



1948 
$104,759,761 



1949 
$108,314,507 



1950 
$118,823,880 



1951 
$119,559,000 



1952 
$123,658,000 $ 



1953 

135,000,000 



Dollar flsurea ihow national ipot revenues of nation' \l Tl It trade dlteounti of fre- 
gum.) and dallar Tolumo; HKFOIIK commissions to reps 



SPONSOR ■ ' Lmale based on industry and station rep tWera?!* 



B A ft 1 11 R A S I ft S iMiae J I 




Announcing 



UPER MARKETING IN 
AN FRANCISCO 

. . . with features that 
no other merchandising plan can offer I 



What it is: Northern California's most 
effective, guaranteed advertising-plus- 
merchandising plan, similar to the highly 
successful WCBS (New York) Supermar- 
keting-but ingeniously adapted to take 
advantage of the unusual characteristics of 
the San Francisco market, where independ- 
ent food stores account for more volume 
than the chain stores. 

Where it is: Only on 50,000-watt KCBS, 
which has a larger average share of audience 
than any other San Francisco radio station 
day and night— month after month. 

What it does : Advertises your product to 
the largest audience throughout the entire 
Bay Area; increases your orders at both 
chain stores and independent supermarkets; 
boosts your volume at point-of-sale. 



How it works: Guarantees (by contract) 
mass displays for your product* in all stores 
of the biggest chains in the area, including 
Purity and Safeway. But that's only half 
the story. In the Bay Area, unlike other 
markets, independent stores account for 
75% of total grocery volume. So KCBS 
Super Marketing has contracts with the 
major wholesalers, too, by which an adver- 
tisement for your product* (produced to 
your specifications) will be inserted, with- 
out cost to you, in the weekly order books 
which these wholesalers send to 2,235 
independent stores. Thus, with Super 
Marketing you cover not only the chains 
but the all-important independent stores 
as well — something no other merchandising 
plan can do for you. For details, call us or 
CBS Radio Spot Sales. 



San Francisco • CBS Owned |\CdS 



*Subject to product approval by the stares. 



12 JULY 1954 



249 



1914 



1954 
















The American Society of Composers, Authors and 
Publishers will be forty years old in 1954. During 
these forty years many important changes have 
taken place in the entertainment world. 

America's listening audience has increased by 
e millions with the growth of new media — such 
as sound pictures, radio, television and juke boxes. 
And the one ingredient in the field of entertainment 
which has survived all technological changes — not 
only survived, but has increased and expanded — is 
Music! It has remained a basic requirement for all 
phases of show business. For a good song always is 
good entertainment! 

ASCAP— entering its forty-first year — is justly 
proud of the repertory of its more than 3,000 song- 
writers and composers. ASCAP also is proud of its 
many years of service to its licensees, and pledges 
itself to a continuation of making available to the 
entertainment world the best in music. 




AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND PUBLISHERS 

575 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 



250 



SPONSOR 



£p| SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 



twprk 
radio 




Ktf 



NIGHTTIME NETWORK RADIO TO COST LESS THIS FALL 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

Q What is the fall outlook for network radio rates? *>»</<' 252 

Q How do agency media directors feel about new discounts'.' P***!? 253 

Q Now does each of the nets figure discounts? {»«?,"' 254 

Q What's new in programing this fall? page 256 

Q Are program formats changing? pnge 256 

Q Will there he more spot carriers next season? pnge 258 

Q W hat's the big problem in networh radio research? page 260 

Q What types of clients are buying net radio? pnge 262 

Q What are some of the most recent net radio buys? page 26*2 

12 JULY 1954 251 




(irvftitlfl C'dl'ff *pOn«Or: Merit Greeting Card Co. of Newark, a 
mail-order house, had sponsored Martin Block locally. Impressed with 
results, firm has bought him on ABC Radio. This new-to-network cli- 
ent has 140-station lineup which covers its four mailing areas all over U.S. 



Soft drill/* sponsor: Royal Crown Cola signed up Robert Q. Ld 
show on CBS Radio Saturday morning for 52 weeks. Client feels LJ 
is merchandisable, bought network radio for broadest possible mtt 
coverage, bought Saturday morning to reach consumer before 



Rates 



Q. How much will network radio 
rates go down this fall? 
A. Rates, as such, will not change. 
What the networks will do is increase 
the nighttime discounts on network 
time charges. The reason discounts 
will be changed and not rates is that 
affiliate stations prefer to keep the base 
i ighttime rate higher than the daytime 
rate for the purpose of maintaining 
their national spot rates. 

CBS Radio and its affiliates, which 
-luted the snowball rolling on re- 
du< ed time chai ges Eoi nighttime net- 
work radio, said in their statement on 
26 May: "To stimulate -till greater 
use "I nighttime hours foi individual!) 
sponsored network programs, CBS 
Radio w ill consider Eoi the fall added 
inducement to advertisers buying facil- 
ities fur theii programs b) adjusting 
l>\ <li- ounts nighttime • osts to approx- 
imate!) those cl premium daytime 
< osts. Related to su< h a cost adjust- 
ment, the program time "I certain 

252 



network shows of 25 minutes or longer 
duration would be reduced slighth to 
permit full one-minute commercial or 
public service announcements by the 
stations." 

CBS has polled its affiliates on the 
question of whether the) would take 
20^? less compensation from network 
sales and it reports a high percentage 
of O.K.'s. The network has already 
guaranteed sponsors a 159? reduction 
in nighttime time charges for fall Inns. 
So it seems safe to sa\ that the discount 
increases will amount to between 15 
and 20', . 

While NBC attacked the CBS move 
as an "act of desperation" and "con- 
trar) to the best interests of radio 
stations and network-." it said it had 
to go along in order to meet the 
competition. Station- ha\e been asked 
to accept a 2u' , reduction in com- 
pensation and NBC made clear it 

would meet whatever actual reduction 
1 BS finall) derided on. 

It ap] ears likel) that \BC will fol- 
low along. Mutual, which has a 
"creeping" rate reduction formula, 



will continue with it. The Mutual 
formula provides for a 50' < reduction 
in nighttime rates in individual markets 
-i\ months alter a t\ station comes on 
the air in that market. Since Mutual'* 
rates have been automaticall) adjusted 
as new video outlet.- have appeared, 
the network -ees no reason to add 
further inducement-. 



Q. Why will the radio networks 
cut their time charges at night? 
A. ObviousK.no business cuts p 
when customers are anxious to buy. 
\ml customers are not exactly banf 
on the radio network-" doors to buy 
nighttime at least, not at the existing 
discount structure. 

It i- interesting to note that 1MB 
gross time sales figures a reliable 
measure for comparing sales activity 
since basic network rate- themselves 
have changed little in recent \ears — 
-how daytime sales down this year, but 
not nighttime. For the first four months 
ol this year the four-network 1MB day- 
time figure was 828,189,001. The 1953 

SPONSOR 




nt groil'ers sponsor: Florida Citrus Commission added network 

&■ to other media, bought "Florida Calling" on MBS with m.c. Tom 

(above). Client hopes to build up citrus fruit use in rural 

>a which it can reach wiih radio, liked idea of show from Florida 



I it. v If f« »!<•«• sponsor: Prudential Insurance Co. put nearly $700,000 
in NBC Radio "Fibber McGee and Molly" nighttime strip for 39 weeks 
starting September. Client likes nighttime radio for low cost and 
ability to reach men, who buy most insurance; is already on daytime 



corresponding figure was $31,470,611. 
Nighttime figures for the first four 
months of this year total 823.454,526 
compared with .$23,845,520 last year 
(see Radio Basics, page 248). 

The advertisers' demands for lower 
time costs or the reluctance to buy at 
the old discount structure are a result 
of the ratings, especially the Nielsen 
figures. Audiences for evening shows 
have dropped substantially — according 
to Nielsen. For the week ended 8 May, 
the average audience for the evening 
once-a-week show was 1,633.000 
homes. This compares with 1,969.000 
during the corresponding week in 
1953. The corresponding 1952 figure 
was 2,097,000. 

One network executive told SPONSOR: 
"Whether we like it or not were stuck 
with the Nielsen figures. They don't 
tell the whole listening story. They 
don t show the growing importance of 
out-of-home listening in autos and on 
portables. Unfortunately, we haven't 
been able to get the same, complete 
figures on out-of-home listening as we 
have on in-home listening. So we have 



to show comparable cost-per-1.000 
figures for daytime and nighttime." 

Another factor in the shying away 
from network radio is the cost of 
competitive media. Television is de- 
vouring advertising dollars at a 
tremendous rate, and its glamor puts 
radio at a psychological disadvantage. 
Costs of other media have been going 
up, too. 



Q. What effect will the reduc- 
tion in network time charges have 
on nighttime business? 

A. sponsor queried media directors 
at a number of the top agencies as to 
the effect of the cuts. Here are some 
answers: 

William C. Dekker, vice president in 
charge of media, McCann-Erickson: 
"To my mind, the recently announced 
rate reduction for evening network 
radio costs should be reflected in in- 
creased use of nighttime network radio 
through package media buys. With a 
favorable cost-per-1.000 opportunity, 
an advertiser can come in and make a 



good buy for two, four, six or eighl 
weeks or more in programs with known 
ratings. Continuance of good night- 
time programing should contribute to 
maintaining the level of listening and 
thus national spot sales should benefit 
as well." 

Arthur Porter, vice president in 
charge of media, Leo Burnett: "Accord- 
ing to the best information available 
from the networks, the proposed rate 
cuts will affect a saving of about 10' - 
to the national advertiser. It is my 
feeling that this is not enough of a 
slice to result in any greatly increased 
use of nighttime network radio. 

"In the 1953- "54 season, in terms of 
reaching people for a dollar, daytime 
radio was most efficient, daytime tv 
was next most efficient, and nighttime 
tv and radio were about equal in 
efficiency. Now, if the advertiser 
receives a 10% reduction in the cost of 
reaching people through nighttime net- 
work radio, this would result in making 
this medium about 10 c r less expensive 
than nighttime tv but not nearb 
i {'lease turn to page 256) 



12 JULY 1954 Network radio program Comparagraph appears this issue page 175 



253 



EASY-TO-USE GUIDE TO NETWORK RADIO 



ABC 



Discounts: ABC, like other webs, has a 

separate discount schedule for morning and 
afternoon. In the morning it runs from 1595 
for billings df less than $3,000 per week to 309? 
for billings of $18,000 or over per week. The 
afternoon schedule runs from 27', to 42%. In 
the evening the gamut is 40'; to 53%. Above 
this there are maximum discounts going up to 
-I'!', in the morning and 549? '" the afternoon 
when billings come to $2.4 million or more. The 
maximum discount in the evening goes to 62' i 
for billings of $1.5 million or more. 

Rebate: There is an annual 99? rebate for 52- 
week advertisers but this added discount can be 
earned by less-than-52-week clients if they spend 
$2.4 million annually on daytime billings or $1.5 



million annually for nighttime billings. 

t ontiyuity: ABC has both vertical ami hori- 
zontal contiguity. It applies only to periods 
15 minutes or more. In vertical contiguity, for 
example, a client can buy a 15-minute show dur- 
ing the day and one at night during the same 
day tor The half-hour rate. Horizontal contigu- 
ity is given only at night for buys totaling an 
hour a week. For example : four l.Vminute shows 
at night can lie bought at the hour rate. Nor- 
mally, a 15-minute show costs 409? of hour rate. 

Other: Nol shown on the rate card are such 
special prices as a 7%-minute rate (one-half of 

1 | -h f. rat.- for Jack (ire-son and an announce- 
ment rate for Martin Pdock. 




CBS 



Discounts: These are now figured on annual 
dollar volume basis but this may be changed to 
weekly dollar volume basis because there is more 
short-term buying on network radio these days. 
Nighttime discounts now run from 'IT'S', for 
any hillings of less than $10,000 during any 52- 
week period up to 44.")' < for billings of $2.5 mil- 
lion or more. Daytime discounts start off with a 
flat -V; for any weekday buy. The regular day- 
time discounts start at >' « for buys over $10.(100 
and go up to 23.59? ,nI " billings of $2.."> million 
or more 

Rebate: Starting last year (T>s gave >'-j'< 

additional discount only to 52-week clients. 
There had been an annual rebate previously but 
sponsors could, in effect, have earned it by 



spending enough money in less than a 52-week 
period. 

( ouf ir/uif ;/: CBS has no contiguity as such 
but an advertiser with a daytime show gets a 
"proportionate hour rate" for a nighttime buy 

of same amount of time or less any day of the 
week. That is. if the advertiser has a l.Vminute 
daytime strip he ,an buy an equal-sized strip at 
night for 259? °f hour rate rather than the regu- 
lar 40% of the hour rate. However, he still pays 
4d' - of the hour rate for his daytime strip. 

yet work ilexibilit y: By the Selective Fa- 
cilities Plan the advertiser does not have to pay 
attention to group requirements but must per- 
mit CBS to sell show in markets where he 

doesn 't sponsor it. 



254 



SPONSOR 



CARDS 



Shows discount systems used by each of the four networks to give you basis 
for understanding upcoming discount changes at the radio networks 



MBS 



Discounts: There are two evening diseounl 

schedules, one schedule for a splil and one 
for a full network. The former run from l\h% 
for buys of less than $3,000 per week to 20% for 
billings of $20,000 or more. The comparable full 
network schedule goes from 15 to 35%. How- 
ever, there is a 50% discount for stations in tv 
markets but in no ease can weekly dollar volume 
discounts at night exceed ^0\[>'i . Since stations 
making up 86% of network time eostN are in tv 
areas this 50% discount applies to virtually all 
stations at night. The maximum diseounl of 
63% can be earned on nighttime billings of $1 
million or more in lieu of the other discounts. 
Daytime discounts go from 22y 2 % to 37U% 
with an annual discount of 50% for billings of 
$1.2 million or more. 



Rebate: There is a 12'^', rebate for 52-week 
clients. However, total discounts cannot exceed 
"><>', daytime and (>:>',' nighttime. 

Contiguity: Vertical only. Example: a cli- 
ent who buys half-hour show during day and 
half-hour show at night on same day gets the 
hour rate instead of two half-hour rates, or To',' 
rather than 90% of evening rate. 

Network flexibility: "Station gronp" re- 
quirements have been eliminated. Even in case 
of high-rated, established MBS "house" prop- 
erties less than full network buys are possible, 
subject to preemption for full network buys. 
For participation buys, requirements for net- 
work size are stringent. 



NBC 



Discounts: Nighttime discounts start at 32% 
for billings under $6,250 per week and go up to 
42% for billings of $50 000 per week and up. 
Advertiser can elect, instead of weekly discounts 
and the annual rebate, an over-all nighttime dis- 
count of 47.75% for combined billings of $1 mil- 
lion and up in a 52-week period. Daytime dis- 
counts run from 5% for billings under $750 per 
week up to 27.5% for billings of $25 ; 000 per 
week and over. However, total discounts, includ- 
ing annual rebate, are reduced by 10 percentage 
points for morning programs. 

Rebate: Advertiser's ou 52 consecutive weeks 
get additional 10% continuity discount. It can- 
not be earned any other way. 

Contiguity: NBC broadened its contiguity 



policies starting 1 March last. The new plan 
permits an advert feer with as few as two quarter- 
hour periods on different days to get contiguous 
rates with other shows of 15 minutes or more on 
same days. Suppose client has 15 minute's on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. If he buys another 
15-minute show on Tuesdays he can combine the 
two Tuesday shows and pay the half-hour rate. 
Similarly for Thursdays. Another change pro- 
vides that sponsors of daytime shows of 15 min- 
utes or longer can buy equal amount of time at 
night at the proportionate hour rate. The night- 
time show could be bought on any night. 

Network flexibility: An advertiser can buy 
any lineup if gross cost is at least 759? °f full 

network. Exception: spol carriers. 



& 12 JULY 1954 



255 



efficient as daytime radio or daytime tv. 

"Willi the obvious advantages of tv 
ovei radio, it <l<>cs not appear to me 
that a H>'< differentia] in cost is 
enough to force advertisers to Btand in 
line i" get into nighttime radio. While 
nighttime radio listening in radio-only 
homes is as high as ever, it has Buffered 
a drastic drop in u homes. 

"I his, combined w iili the fact that 
there are about 20-25' - Eewer radio- 
only homes than there were a year 
ago, ma) mean thai tlie networks" rate 
< ill ma\ be too little and too late. 

/ red Barrett, vice president in charge 
of media, BBDO: "Since we buy 
media on its effectiveness and it- 
ability to meet the needs of a spe< ifi< 
product or problem, rate cuts are tn>t 
likely to change our thinking one way 
oi the other should some media prob- 
lem suggest the use of the network 
radio." 

Walter G. Smith, vice president and 
media director, Biotu: '*In our opinion, 
the recent radio network rate adjust- 
ments are long overdue. While these 
rate cu!s should be helpful in main- 
taining a good share of current net- 
work volume, we question whether they 
will attract any important new business. 
We believe the networks mav have to 
give consideration to additional rate 
adjustments, and an even more flexible 
policy of station selection if they expect 
to maintain a substantial volume of 
advertising in the future." 



Programing 

Q. What's new in network radio 
programing this fall? 
A. Programing trends this fall will 
be marked by an intensification of 
previous developments caused 1>\ tele- 
vision, especially at night. Possibly the 
most until .able development will be 
the increased use ol strips at night. 

CBS will have an hour ol them from 
9: 10 to 10:30 p.m. The Amos V indy 

Music Hall will l>c on from 9:30 to 
9:55 five nights a week, Followed by 
five minutes ol Bob I rout and the 
news. Two L5-minute strips will follow 
l'>i>|i I rout. \h. Keen and Life nith 
Luigi. Both Mi. kern and Imos " 

ln</\ will also remain in theii half- 
houi pei iod weekly formats on I i iday 
and Sunday . respectively . I he 25- 
minute Imos V \ml\ -hi|i period will 
be wai mid up tin- summer by Ja< k 
( arson. 



NBC will add anothei nighttime 
-tii|i to it- existing Fibbei \icGee and 
\h>il\ across-the-boarder. It will be 
The Great Gildersleeve. The two will 
run back-to-back in the 10:00-10:30 
pei iod Sunday through I hursday. I his 
unconventional five-day run i- caused 
li\ Borne new business in NBC Radio's 
I i iday lineup. < rillette's fi^ht -how. 
Cavalcade of Sports, came over t<> NBC 
from Wtt. as part of a bi<i move of 
Toni-Gillette business to NBC Radio 

and TV. 

VBC, which had an hour of 15- 
minute across-the-boarders from 8:00- 
0:00 p.m. during this past season was 
unable to get much business out of 
them and is switching over to a longer 
show, the hour-long Jack Gregson 
Show, already on. The Gregson pro- 
gram will probably be on Tuesday 
through Friday in the fall. On Monday 
ABC is building a program lineup 
around its newly acquired Voice of 
Firestone, which keeps the same slot 
it had on .\BC, 8:30-9:00. Keeping the 
same time slot was. of course, of great 
importance to this old-timer on radio. 
ABC will also retain the strip format in 
the 10:00-10:30 p.m. period. 

Mutual has no new plans for night- 
time strips. However, its block of 
half-hour mysteries from 8:00 to 9:00 
p.m. even weekday can be considered 
a kind of strip since the same kind of 
show is on at the same time e\cr\ 
v/eekdav night. 



Q. What is the reason for the 
increased use of strips? 

A. There are a number of them. 

In the first place, talent and produc- 
tion costs can be spread out in a strip, 
and so they are cheaper buys for the 
advertiser, a \er\ important factor in 
radio these day s. 

Secondh. they are a way for adver- 
tisers to gather large cumulative audi- 
ences quickly, a factor of growing 
importance in buying radio today. 

Thirdh. they offer another device 
for networks to sell announcements or 
segments to clients seeking cheap circu- 
lation buys. While am of the radio 
networks would be glad to sell night- 
time strips to single advertisers, the 
actual purpose of them in 1954 i- to 
sell them to a variety of advertisers in 
a vaj iety of way s. 

Fourthly, the strip is easy for the 
listener to remember. It is felt that the 
radio audience has enough t«> remem- 
ber in the way of television programs 



and thai his memory of radio programs 
tends t<' be secondary. With strips the 
listener can easily remember that, for 
example. Jmo5 " Andy i- on 9:30 
every night or Fibber is on at 10:00 
every night. The Mutual block of 
mystery shows, while not -trips in the 
ordinary &ense -till cater to the easy- 
to-remember factor. 



Q. What changes are going on 
in radio network program formats? 
A. The trend toward easy-to-listen-to 
-hows is continuing. This i- the net- 
w oi k-" way of adjusting themselves to 
the changes in the way people listen 
nowadays. With the growth of out-of- 
liome listening and the spread of radio 
sets outside the living room, the I ,S. 
audience more and more listens while 
doing something else. 

This listening revolution i- by no 
means a 100' < thing. The top radio 
network shows are still the conven- 
tional one-, like Amos ' n Andy and 
the Jack Benny Show. \ good -how is 
t a-\ to listen to whether \oure in the 
living room, in an automobile, on the 
beach, in the kitchen, bedroom or den. 
But it i- significant that the new Amos 
n Andy strip is colored by the di>k 
jockey format which has been so suc- 
cessful and which has enabled the inde- 
pendent stations to give the network 
outlets a run for their money. 

The new A& t strip on CB^ Radio 
will be part fiction, part realitv. It will 
not be a storv show. It will "originate* 
from the Grand Ballroom of the 
Mystic Knights of the Sea. Recorded 
music will be pla\ed. quests will appear 
but \nio-. \ndv and the Kingfish, who 
will "manage" the -how will play 
their parts in character. \ hypothetical 
gimmick might be some ludicrous mix- 
up whereby the Kingfish mistakes 
Frank Sinatra for Eddie Fisher when 
the former appears on the show. 

Another swi'ch in approach for a 
well-known radio personality will be 
the new Edgar Bergen show, which 
Kraft will sponsor on CBS Radio for 
an hour on Sunday nights starting in 
the fall. Bergen and his puppets will 
indulge in discussions of politics, 
-port-, -how business anything of 
current interest. There will be well- 
known guests and there will be musical 
recordings played a la the d.j. I he 
approach will be low-key. There will 
be humor, but it will not be a comedy 
-how in the u-tial sense. 

I he above shows are examples of the 



256 



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can cover Georgia's 
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represented 
individually and 
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NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT ATLANTA 

12 JULY 1954 



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CBS Radio 




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257 






networks' efforts to find a program 
formula which n<>t onlj will compete 
with t\ bul with the independent sta- 
1 1 « • 1 1 — . I In- increasing emphasis on 
music and news in network program- 
ing, the network people realize, might 
be Fata] i" the networks it it turns 
cut id be a < arbon < -• »| » \ of programing 
l>\ the independent outlets. 



Spot carriers 

Q. What's the outlook for spot 
carriers? 

A. More ol them. \\ bile spol carriers 
have not been an outstanding success 
in all cases the reason is the adver- 
tiser's resistance t" network radio 
rather than a dislike of the spot 
can iii idea itself. 



Q. What does the advertiser like 
about spot carriers? 

A. 1 he) are a (heap way of reaching 
a lot of different homes. By buying 
announcements in a group of different 
shows .ii on different days of the week 
in the same strip the advertiser is able 
to scatter his shots. He is likely to 
reach more different homes with three 
scattered spot carrier announcements 
than with three commercials in the 
same show. 

Counter-balancing this unduplicated 
homes advantage is the fact that each 
home reached through spot carrier 
huvs is likely to be reached fewer 
times than the homes reached through 
one complete program. In addition. 
the sponsor buying a complete show 
toi himself gets better sponsor identi- 
fication and is better able to merchan- 
dise the -how and its personalitv. 



Q. What's new in spot carriers? 
A. Mutual is polling it< affiliates to 
gel an O.K.. on its new half-hour spot 
carrier strip on weekday mornings and 
a similar strip in the afternoon. 
I his will be added to the existing 
Multi-Message Plan in the evening 

.ind on late Sundaj afternoon. The 
MBS affiliate committee alread) has 
approved the new plan. 

I lie mOl r i i ti l: -t i i|> w ill be StOt \ 

Time with Madeleine Carroll. She will 
narrate the stories and ad in them. 

I .K ll BtO] J H ill be a week long. The 

time slot will be 10:30-1 1 :00 p.m. The 
pi ice baa nol been de< ided upon yet 



but in line with previous Mutual spot 
carriers there will he four announce- 
ments per hour. The afternoon strip 

won't lie -ct up until the morning strip 

i- -old. 

In its announcement disclosing the 
cut in nighttime costs CMS and its 
affiliates deplored "the widespread 
activities of some network- in accentu- 
ating the sale of other than the CU8- 
lomarv lime and program unit-. In 
line with this, < IBS will -ell its new 
15-minute nighttime strips and some 
of it- longer -how- in 15-minute seg- 
ment-. One exception i> the Amos ii' 

Indy 25-minute strip which will be 
sold in six-minute segments. 

This means that the sponsor can 
buy as little as one program in a 15- 
minute strip. Of course, nobody buying 
network radio will normallv Inn 15 
minutes of programing and no more. 
It - not onrj ineffective, it's expensive 
because the time discounts will be nil 
or practically nil. The point is that the 
CBS strips will be flexible buys, one 
of the important characteristics of the 
spot carriers. 

It is not outside the realm of possi- 
bility that if the 15-minute segments 
do not sell well, CBS will break them 
down into TV-j-minute segments. This 
means in effect, selling single com- 
mercials. 

The 7 1 -j-minute segment, which 
means four commercials within a half- 
hour show, seems to be "rowing in 
popularity. NBC's long participation 
shows provide for eight announcements 
an hour. MutuaPs original Multi-Mes- 
sage Plan provided for three commer- 
cials per half hour but this was later 
switched to four. CBS' Power Plan, 
which has been discarded, sold three 
commercials per half hour. The use of 
four per half hour means, of course, a 
cheaper price. 

\HC has added only one spot carrier 
to its present roster. However, it has 
the O.K. from its affiliates to program 
12 additional hours of spot carriers. 
These will not be put on until the 
existing ones are sold out or nearK 
sold out. 

\l!( - new spot carrier is The Great 
Gildersleeve, which will become part 
of the Three Plan, following another 

Three Plan strip, Fibber XtcGee and 

Molly, at 10:15 p.m. The remaining 
Three Plan weekdav strips are Second 

Chance, on at 11:45 to noon, and // 

/'(/is to be Married, on from 5 : T5 to 

6:00 p.m. 

There are four other NBC participa- 



tion -how-, some of which involve 
some time -witrhes for the fall. Road- 
show, now on from 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. 
Saturday ma) be moved over to the 
I I :00 a.m. to 1 :00 p.m. slot on the 
same day. Weekend will be shortened 
a half hour and i- scheduled to run 
from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. Sunday instead 
of 4:00 to 0:00 p.m. The Big Previeu . 
now on from 7 :30 to 0:30 p.m. Satur- 
day will be shifted over to the Fridav 
8:30-10:00 p.m. slot leading into the 
Gillette fi<_d)t-. previously on A I'd 
Badio. Part of its time on Saturdav 
will be filled in with a scheduled one- 
hour Boston Symphony concert. Sun- 
day with Garroway remains in the 
8:00-10:00 p.m. Sunday period. 



Q. What do participations and 
segments cost? 

A. They're generallv cheap. Thi- u 
so despite the fact that the sponsor 
generallv has to buy the complete net- 
work or whatever stations carry the 
show. The flexible station lineups 
which a sponsor can get with his own 
show are not available to buyers of 
spot carriers usually. 

The Three Plan has had a minimum- 
buy requirement of three participations 
a week for four weeks. While this i- 
teehnicallv still in effect it will not In- 
required in all cases. For example, an 
advertiser who buys a big chunk of the 
Three Plan for. say. a two-week satura- 
tion campaign will not be turned down 
because it is less than a four-week buy. 

The two nighttime Three Plan strips 
sell for $3,200 per participation or 
$8,750 for three. The two daytime par- 
ticipation strips cost S2.250 per for 
Second Chance and $2,025 for // Pays 
to be Married. The first-mentioned 
daytime strip costs more because it a 
on during morning time. 

The other four participation shows 
are priced as follows: Roadshoic. 
Weekend and The Big Previeu sell 
announcements for $2,250 while on 
Sunday with Garroway the pri' < 
$2,000. The Three Plan has its own 
discount structure apart from the gen- 
eral network discount structure. These 
run up to !!' i for 156 or more partici- 
pations within a 52-week period. Par- 
ticipation huvs on the other NBC spol 
carrier- can be combined with the 
Three Plan buys for discount purpos - 

On CBS the new nighttime strips 
are priced as follows; Amos V And) 
Music Hall will be $2,943 pei six- 
minute segment. This includes time 



258 



SPONSOR 



w to keep from getting lost 
in NEW YORK or CHICAGO 






Ever wonder whether Presba, Fellers & Presba 

was on North Michigan or South Wacker? Ever 

worry as you pulled out of Grand Central Station 

how many important calls you forgot during your 

three days in New York? It happens to the 

best of us, at the worst times. 

Next time you re in New York or Chicago make 

very minute and call count by using SPONSOR'S 1954 

pocket-size, 16-page booklet titled "Radio and TV 

Directory of New York and Chicago." Here you 11 

find names and addresses, by categories, of key 

advertisers, agencies, stations, networks, news 

services, representatives, TV film services, music and 

transcription services, research firms, hotels. 

We'll be glad to send you a Radio and TV Directory 
on request — with the compliments of SPONSOR. 

P.S. — Don't forget to call on us 
next time you're in town. 



SPONSOR 



DIRECTORY 



OF NEW YORK 
AND CHICAGO 



1954-55 




-Jfr Advertisers 

■X- 

■X". Associations 

* Hotels 

4fr Networks 

■Jf Resec 

■X- Repre; 

■K" Service 

■3fr Stati 

•X- TV Film Sources 



The magazine radio and TV advertisers USE 



New York 17 40 E. 49th • MUrray Hill 8-2772 

Chicago 161 E, Grand ■ Superior 7-9863 

Dallas 1500 Jackson * RAndolph 7381 

Los Angeles 6087 Sunset • Hollywood 4-8089 



;.ml talent. Program prices l<>r \h. 
Keen, which i- alread) on tin- air, and 
Life with Luigi are $1,340 and $1,500 
pei quarter hour, respoi lively. 

Cli^ Radio is planning to bring back 
Stop the Music in 1 1 1«- fall. Berl Parks 
will possibl) be m.c. The unusually 
interesting thing about it, however, 
i- th.it it ma) be I ' 2 hours long and 
will be slotted between <'!:•»() and 9:30 
p.m. on I uesda) s. \t least it \\ ill I"' 

iliat Ion- 1! the (i :an be -"Id. 

Advertisers will 1m- aide to buj the 
show in segments with tin- price $2,000 
per segment. 



Ilc»s€ k ;ir<*li 



Q. What's the big problem in 
network radio research? 
A. Our of the biggest, if not the big- 
gest, i> to measure the extent of out- 
of-home listening on a regular pro- 
gram basis. 



Q. Why is this particularly im- 
portant? 

A. Because the amount of out-of- 
home listening i- increasing in abso- 
lute figures and relative to in-home 
listening. Most of this out-of-home 
listening i- in automobiles — there are 
29 million or more auto radios — and 
the networks consider other out-of- 
home listening a factor, too. In a pres- 
entation now making the rounds of 
agencies and advertisers, CBS Radio 
points out that there are about 10 mil- 
lion batter) -operated portables and 
about 1*) million radios in public 
places. The problem of how to mea- 
sure all this listening economically is 
a humdinger. 



Q. To what extent is out-of- 
home listening increasing? 
A. Pulse lias been measuring out-of- 
home listening locall) in an increasing 
ninnliei ol markets Eoi lour years. In 
those mat kets ' -ix ol them 1 where 
out-of-home listening ha- been mea- 
sured dm in- those loin \ ears the in- 
1 rease 1- '■-" i . 

\- a by-producl ol it- < overage stud) 
in 1952, Nielsen found thai the aver- 
age houi l\ amount ol out-of-home li-- 
tening relative to in-home went from 
I I .'i' . dm inj the week to 14.89! on 
weekends. However, during a number 



ol hours the percent rose to from 25 
to more than 30%. There 1- general 
agreement thai Bince l'.>.">2 the figures 
have gone up substantial!) . 



Q. What is the outlook for the 
measurement of out-of-home lis- 
tening? 

A. As a by-product of it- new local 
rating service, Nielsen i- offering the 
network- national auto radio -et-in- 
use figure- b) quarter hours. These 
will be given as a percent of home- 
using radio. These auto radio listen- 
ing figures will also be available local- 
ly. There will be no breakdown b) 
programs, however. 

Auto listening data will he collected 
from Nielsen diaries (Audilogs) plus 
Recordimeters on auto radio-. These 
Recordimeters -how the amount of 
lime a radio or t\ -el i- turned on but. 
unlike the Audimeter, do not -how sta- 
tion or channel listened to. The auto 
Recordimeler. unlike the home Record- 
imeter, will not lor obvious reasons 
buzz or light up periodical!) to remind 
ihe listener to fill in the diary. The net- 
works and Nielsen are still dickering 
about this service and it is not known 
exactly when the information will first 
be available. One of the webs is re- 
ported close to signing up. 



Q. What new research is being 
done affecting network radio? 

A. Anxiouslv awaited are the re-ults 
of the BAB-four network radio and t\ 
set count. With the field work already 
completed by the Alfred Politz Re- 
search organization, results are now 
being tabulated and the figures are ex- 
pected to be out by the end of this 
month. The stud) will have stature in 
advertising circles, having been vali- 
dated by the Advertising Research 
Foundation. 

The Politz stud) did not go into ac- 
tual listening but gathered complete 
information on all radio and t\ sets 
in and outside the home, where the) 
are located and how main each home 
ha-. 

Also expected to be released shortly, 
if it ha- not alread) been released, are 
partial figures on Mutual's radio study. 
This Study, done In J. \. Ward. Inc.. 
not onl) < ounted radio ami t\ sets ami 
noted their locations but gathered ma- 
terial on listening ami viewing habits 
In quartet hours ol the da) . 



I 01 example, those interviewed were 
not only asked whether the) were lis- 
tening to their radio or t\ -ets each 15 
minutes but were asked what the) were 
doing. This will not onl) give a pro- 
file of famil) activit) all through the 
da) but will -how to what extent peo- 
ple listen to radio while doing some- 
thing el-e. 

Mutual will not release all the data 
gathered in the studv hut will use some 
of it for -perific -ale- pitches to client- 
ami prospective clients. However, mosl 
of the broad results are expected to he 
made public. 



Q. What research data are the 
networks pitching at advertisers? 
A. Aside from pointing out the bo- 
nus of out-of-home listening, the net- 
work- are stressing such things as ill 
total amount of radio listening in the 
country, i2i the large unduplicated 
audiences a radio advertiser can gath- 
er over a period of time and 1 \ I the 
-till-large percent of non-tv home-. 

In its new general radio presenta- 
tion CBS is stressing figures showing 
total in-home radio listening that Niel- 
sen got together for the radio networks 
in March. The) show that 92' ! of all 
radio homes listen to radio sometime 
during the week. This is a weighted 
average of the 909< of tv homes that 
listen to radio during the week am 
the K )W , of radio-onl) home- that 
listen. The figures also show that the 
average radio home listens 20 hours 
and 44 minutes each week and that 
1I1 lit million people are listening 
during the average davtime minute 
and (2 1 13 million listen during the 
average nighttime minute. These fig- 
ures are for in-home listening only. 
Thev cover the week of 7-13 M 

1954 

The large unduplicated radio audi- 
ences that an advertiser can gather 
through a single buv or a serie 
spot carrier bins i< another wav <>l 
saying that radio program audi' 
show a large turnover. Here i- a sam- 
ple of unduplicated audiences t 
half-hour once-a-week evening pro 
gram. Ihe figure- are Nielsen's: 

The program averages a (>. 1 ratinj 
during a 12-week period with a hiiill 
of 8.0 and a low of l.'i. The av< 
number of home- rea< hed each week i 
2,982,000. Dunn- the fir-t W( 
llii- 12- week period the pro 
reached 6.7^ of all radio home-. Th 



260 



SPONS0I 



They live on the Pacific Coast... 



they listen to DON LEE RADIO 



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qhigh score in coverage, choose six letters . . . DON LEE, 

1 1' station network that sells 45 important Pacific Coast 

'" kc ts from within. It's the nation's greatest regional network. 



MMMeE 



RADIO 



Don Lee Broadcasting System, 
Hollywood 28, California, 

Represented nationally by 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 



i 



.1 week it reach* <l 5.9' i . Borne <>f 
whom heard the first broadcast, but 
in. ii | "l w bona didn't, i Since Nielsen 
has a fixed sample, ii can mea ure this 
(lupin ation. i \ total <>f 2.')' , of all 
radio 1 n >i 1 1« ■- represent new homes 
u hi< Ii did not heai the fii st pi ogram. 
Thus the unduplicated homes percent- 
is 9.6 % "i all radio homes. 
I his unduplicated homes total con- 
tinues rising. \i the end ol four weeks 
the unduplicated rating is I 1.5 or 6,- 

757,000 homes. \t the end of 12 weeks 

the unduplicated rating i- 25.6' i of all 
radio home- or 11,930,000 homes 
which have heard one or more pro- 
gram-. 

This audience accumulation is more 
marked on radio than on i\. The rea- 
son is that the average radio rating is 
lower than I lie average television rat- 
in-. \ h program viewed l>\ !<•', of 
all the t\ homes obvioush cannot 
quadruple the number of different 
homes which tune in while a radio 
show with a rating of 6.4 has lots of 
room to do so. 

It should also be noted that undu- 
plicated homes figures are not a mea- 
sure of total home impressions. A tv 



America's No. 1 
Negro Market 



WWRL has a larger audience in the 
1,045,371 New York Negro Market 
than any other station — network or in- 
dependent — according to Pulse Ratings. 
WWRL moves merchandise FAST — 
that's why: 



Carolina Rice 
Aunt Jemima Flour 
Tip Top Bread 
Carnation Milk 
Manischewitz Wine 



Camel Cigarettes 
Scott's Emulsion 
Lyd.a Pinkham 
Feenamint 
B J Headache 
Powders 

use WWRL to outsell all competition. 
Discover today how New York's Negro 
Market (greater than ALL of Boston, 
St. Louis or Pittsburgh) plus WWRL 
programs and merchandising can pro- 
duce greater sales for you. 

Pulse Report on Request 
DEfcndcr 5-1600 

In New York City 
at 5,000 Watts 

K1B 



program ma) show a slower rate of 
rise in unduplicated audience <>\er a 
period ol weeks but the probabilities 
are thai each home hit i- hit more often 
than a comparable radio Bhow. 

Turning now to point No. 3 in th<- 
first paragraph of this question: 
The radio networks have not been 

pushing too hard the point that ladio 
is the best wa) to reach non-t\ homes. 
\- the number of non-tv homes has 
been deon-a-in^ that sales argument 
has been losing it* force. The radio 
Stations and networks have been pro- 
graming more and more to tv home-. 

Despite the decreasing number of 
radio-only homes there is -till a large 
number of them. NBC Radio is mak- 
ing a point of that in one of its new- 
est sales presentations. I he presenta- 
tion declares that an advertiser who 
uses network t\ must complement his 
television advertising for full national 
coverage. 

It points out that of the 47,500,000 
U.S. homes b'.V ( have tv sets but only 
40' l of U.S. homes have tv sets and 
are in the coverage areas of "the aver- 
age 66-station evening television net- 
work." That leaves 51 ' < of U.S. homes 
uncovered, on the average. Even if 
every tv home is covered an adver- 
tiser' would miss 17.100.000 or 37', 
of all U.S. homes. However, to in- 
crease a tv network station lineup is 
often difficult, clearances being what 
they are. and. NBC sa\s, the mush- 
rooming co?t is out of proportion to 
the gain in coverage. The presentation 
states: "When you increase I from I 
basic to full tv network, coverage (is) 
up 21 ' i and cost (is) up 50' < ." 

The presentation also compares net- 
work radio with four top national mag- 
azines and four top Sunday supple- 
ments in their ability to reach non-tv 
homes. It finds that the number of 
non-tv homes reached by these eight 
periodicals ranges from 1.251.000 to 
3,843,000 per issue and compares this 
with the 17.100.000 non-tv homes 
which can be reached 1>\ radio. 

The presentation also torn lies on the 
amount of duplication between radio 
and t\ programs. Quoting a Nielsen 
stud) <>f 17 radio-ft program combina- 
tions, the presentation point- out that 
the highest delivered audience duplica- 
tion for an) combination was 4.3' i 
while the average duplication for all 
17 wa- l.'>' . 

\- a final inducement to prospective 
client- \RU Radio offers "at no COSl 



to you, a complete Nielsen analysis 
(of) \our t\ advertising combined 
with a recommended complementary 

-< hedule." 



Network advertisers 



Q. Who's buying more of radio 
network advertising and who's 
buying less? 

A. \ comparison of 1MB indu try 
figures for the fir>t four months of 
this year vs. the corresponding period 
last year show-: 

1. In three important categories 
there are increases in gross billu 
loi Boaps and cleansers, autos and ac- 
cessories, gasoline and oil. In the case 
of the soaps and cleansers and gasoline 
and oil classifications the upward move 
in billings is a reversal of the 1953 
trend. There are a variety of reasons 
for the increase in soap and cleanser 
business but the gas and oil increase 
seems clearly linked to the increased 
advertising for the new. higher octane 
auto fuels. The increase in auto ad- 
vertising on the radio networks (from 
$2.0 to $3.4 million i is a continuation 
of last year's upward rise, a result of 
the keener competition in the busin - 
Auto billings went from > 4 . 1 in 1952 
to $8.0 million in 1953 on network ra- 
dio, according to PIB. 

2. In five important categories there 
were decreases in toiletries, drugs, 
food, tobacco and household equip- 
ment billing-. The first three cate- 
gories are the most important in net- 
work radio from the standpoint of 
billings. The decline in food billings a 
a continuation of last year's trend. 
However. L953 PIB hillings for toilet- 
ries and drugs were above 1952. 



Q. What are some of the new 
radio network buys this year? 
A. ABU has attracted four clients 
new to network radio. They are < 
Paw Rubber Co.. which bought Mod- 
ern Romances; Merit Greeting Card 
Co., which bought into the Marl n 
Block Show; Elsevier Press, which 
bought health talk- h\ Carlton Fred- 
ericks, and Table Products Co.. a divi- 
sion of Safeway Stores, which bought 
\o School Today. 

( U x was quite successful in selling 
it- Robert Q. Lewis Saturday morning 
show. whi<b began earh this \ear. 



262 



SPONSOR 



Among those who bought: Royal Crown 
Cola, Hclene Curtis and Doeskin. A. 
E. Staley, a new-to-radio-network cli- 
ent, starts on the Godfrey morning 
show 19 July. Eversharp has signed 
up for the Godfrey Digest. Dr. Scholl 
is a new sponsor for the 24 April-31 
July period. One of the most impor- 
tant new radio purchases is Kraft's 
huy of Edgar Bergen for an hour on 
Sunday nights, starting in the fall. 
(Kraft dropped The Great Gilder sleeve 
on NBC Radio.) 

Mutual has sold the Florida Calling 
show with m.c. Tom Moore to the Flor- 
ida Citrus Commission. The Pan 
American Coffee Bureau has picked up 
participations in the Multi-Message 
Plan. Bridgeport Brass has also bought 
into Multi-Message. Other 1954 clients 
include Grand Duchess Steaks and Ni- 
agara Manufacturing and Distributing. 

NBC wrapped up two clients new to 
network radio this year. Mytinger & 
Casllebury, makers of Nutrilite, a food 
supplement, will sponsor the Dennis 
Day show on Sunday afternoon. D- 
Con Co. bought two shows on Satur- 
day, one in the morning, Doorway to 
Beauty. There is a good chance that 
the American Dairy Association will 
buv Bob Hope on Thursday nights this 
fall. The sale of participations to Pru- 
dential and RCA amounted to $1.5 
million in new business. The insurance 
company will start off in September, 
RCA this month. • • • 



SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 57) 

FLEXIBLE BUYING CITED 

By Thomas F. O'JSeil 
President, Mutual Broadcasting System 

Flexibility is the 
keynote in net- 
Iwork time buy- 
fing this fall. Oth- 
fer factors adver- 
tisers will be 
watching are 
changes in listen- 
ing patterns 
'(where listening 
will increase outside the living room 
and out-of-doors), improved program- 
ing, intensified merchandising support 
and coverage other media miss. 

More detailed research figures are in 
the offing for MBS clients. Results of 





KOMA 

Affiliated Management KWTV CBS 



" KOMA carried the first Ford 
dealer's sponsorship of Edward 
R. Murrow on a spot sales basis. 



_Btf^50L 




CBS 

EDGAR T. BELL 

General Manager 

GENE RIESEN 
Sales Manager 





REPRESENTED BY 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



12 JULY 1954 



263 



Him- where and 
when listening is done ' kii< hen, 
di ii i ami who listens (housewife, teen- 
d theii in "Mi.- levels • a- well 
.,- how man) listen v% i 1 1 be available 
enabling advertisers t.. invesl theii 
dollar- more wiselj than ever In-fore. 

Mutual- "Multi-Message Plan," in- 
augurated lanuar) 1952, quickl) be- 
• ame a favorite h itfa advertisers I 
.hhI -mall. This fall the network plans 
to offer a daytime counterpart morn- 
ing ami aften n "multi-message 

sessions. In tin- past season more lead- 
ing advertisers used MBS than evei 
before in it- history. Vnd a sizable 
number "I sponsors new t<> network 
radio were added a- will. 

Greatei nighttime values are another 
radio "plus" advertisers will find diffi- 
< ult to ignore. The MBS formula. 
which compares favorablj with the 
newl) reduced rat*-- announced bj 
other networks recently, has l>een in 
. lit-, t foi Mutual"- automatv 

formula foi reduction of nighttime 
rates tin- onlj on.- in network radio 

afford- advertisers a continuous!) 
adjusted rati- structure whenever tv 
enter- a radio market. 

Increased merchandising -upport — 
on a local level i- another plus at 
Mutual. \ new merchandising plan is 
soon to be put into effect. The trend 
to larger network hookups, lor more 
concentrated coverage, will continue. 
In 1950 tin- average lineup totaled 207 
stations. It rose to 318 in '51, 366 in 
">2 a\\<\ 135 in '53. 

Closer) watched b) advertisers will 
In- Mutual".- polic) <>f retaining the ac- 
cepted and highl) rated programing 
structure intact during the summer 
month- a— in in- a -olid and loyal au- 
dien< e foi the fall season. 



TV'S AUDIENCE LEAKAGE 

li\ Hnbrrl E. hintucr 
President, tBt 

sponsor's ques- 
tion, "\\ hat are 

tin- r a d i i ' - 1 \ 
trends advei ti-- 
• i- should look 
out t " i this 
fall.'" inti 

me. 

I nail the 

question through 
twice. M) -■■ "ml reading wa- the pro- 
of the lll-t. I should like 

io answei tin- question, a- I first in- 




terpreted it. And -o you ma\ know 
how I read it. I -hall rephrase the 
question: "'What radio-t\ trends should 
advertisers beware this fall.' 

I will eite only one ... in television 
where one can detect the subtle begin- 
nings of what 1 call "tv's audience 
leakage." 

Ever) shopping day, 23,753 homes 
l-u\ a t\ -et for the fir-t time. \nd the 

circulation of evening television cun- 

tinue- to mount. Witness the 17.271.- 

000 home- that now w at' h t\ per a\er- 

minute in the prime 8:00-10:00 

p.m. hours. Last \ear it was 13.770.- 

000 ho,,,.-. I,, 1952 it was 11.211.000 
homes. Yen thi- fabulous growth 
<~>\'< in two years) ha-. I fear, ob- 
scured a -mall < ontrarv trend which, 
if unheeded, would constitute a threat. 

I refer to television's audience leak- 
age. That segment of tv's potential 
audience which leak- away before it- 
expected \olume is delivered to the 
advertiser. 

We at ABC have been studxin- 
homes whose viewing i- atypicall) 
light This is the group whose view- 
ing hahits are said to be proving in- 
creasing!) "selective." This is a eu- 
phemism for what our research shows 
to be some evidence of a still small 
hut growing reaction against what has 
been called "the miser) of choice" be- 
tween pro-rams of too similar and 
therefore monotonous quality. I re- 
fer to the beginning of a development 
more fundamental than the wearing 
out of t\ - novelty . 

Program diversification and balance 
offering a greater variet) of choice 
will plug the leak. And this means a 
program fare in prime time — far 
broader than variet) reviews, comedi- 
ans and drama show -. 

It means a refusal on the part of 

1 oth the advertiser and the broad- astei 
to worship at tin- shrine of ratings. 
The total cumulative audience — not 
the per-telecasl audience— musl be the 
ti-t. It would be unthinkable for the 
Veu Yorh Times, for example, to i tit 
to tabloid size t" reach the circulation 
oi the Daily \'/<n. Yel this absurdit) 
would parallel the rat i n- it t- which has 
infected television with the \iru- of 
imitation which results in sameness. 

I In- i- w h) \l!< I \ i- delighted to 
th< ' oit e "i I irestone. I his is 
hi u ith it- "W ii tele, asl . on- 
i ept it doesn't attempt to follow the 
mi ..t an) other program it ha- 
lt- own vitality. Those who ha\e 
point.-. I ..ut thai the ' oice of Firestone 



fail- to achieve the highest levels ol 
rating apparent!) fail to see that this 
program add- far more to television's 
< in illation ha-e. i.e.. it- net undupli- 
( ated audience, than the typical higher 
rated program. 

However, a pro-ram which is new 
and different < an also be a serious con- 
tender for top 10 rating honor-. For 
example, Disneyland which premieres 
on UJC l\ October 27. Disneyland 
will rotate four new and different 
format area-. New concepts which 
innovate, not imitate. 

One 1954-1955 t\ trend to beware is 
"tv's audience leakage." The leak, now 
tiny, can be completely plugged by 
new programing which doe- not 
imitate but whi'h through offering the 
public something either new or differ- 
ent adds varietv. richness, balance, and 
therefore audience recruiting power to 
television's pro-ran, -tru<ture. 



INTEREST CROWS IN NEWS 
By Ted Bergmana 

Managing Director. Du Mont 

Spon -or- with 
whom Du Mont 
i- -haping up its 
fall and winter 
-< hedule are 
showing major 
interest not alone 
in entertainment 
programs, hut in 
news, in gporti 
and in color, a- well as in the produc- 
tion facilities being made available to 
them through our new Tele-Centre. We 
an- negotiating at the moment witl 
national ad\erti-er- on shows tha 
range from 30-minute dramatic 
entations and quizzes to a one-hoi 
variet) -how. We find several substan- 
tial network -pon-ors intere-ted in 
-Iron- new- programs and we full 
peel to have at least one such program 
on the air this fall with an outstand- 
ing national!) known commentator 
it- ke\ personality . 

Ratings <>n professional football la 
fall di-' losed an enthusiastic Sunda 
afternoon sports audience. We 
lake advantage of (hat h\ airing 
-trolls - h.-. lulc of weekend Saturda 
nigh I ami Sunda) afternoon footha 
-aim-- from October through earh 
. ember. 

During the last few week- virtualb 
all important sponsor and agenc) 61 
c utives in Manhattan ha\e \i-ited ou 




264 



SPONSOI 



w> 



will 

tlunl 

,) it 



airn! 






new Tele-Centre. The) lell us they are 
impressed by its completeness. I>\ fa- 
( ilities which assure them economical 
production of any type program from 
the simplest to the most elaborate. 
They were likewise interested in our 
plans to originate color programs by 
film over WABD in September and to 
pick up color "live" from the uetworks 
on WDTV. Pittsburgh, about the same 
time, with WTTG, Washington, add- 
ing similar equipment sometime later. 

RADIO-TV AT CROSSROADS 

By E. L. Deckittger 

Vice President & Director of Research 
The Biotv Co.. New York 

Television and 
radio are each 
at crossroads in 
their develop- 
ment. Television 
is on the verge 
of becoming a 
JA national medium 

A for advertisers; 

Mm radio faces the 

possibility of loss of such status for 
advertisers. 

In such an atmosphere of turbulence 
and change, the media analyst must be 
alert to many trends. Among them are 
these : 
A. — Television developments 

1. The size of network needed for 
virtual national coverage. 

2. Degree of success of morning 
and day tv. 

3. Rate of development of uhf. 

4. Rate of development of a "third 
network. 

5. "Settle down" level of tv view ing. 

6. Rate of development of color. 

7. Development, if any, of subscrip- 
tion tv. 

8. Degree of success of tv interests 
in keeping costs under control. 

9. Rate at which home-saturation 
is achieved in set-ownership. 

B.— Radio 

1. Success of radio in programing 
to combat tv. 

2. Effect of influx of tv serials — 
and growth of day tv in general — on 
day radio. 

3. Effect of development of second- 
ary tv set on radio's secondary audi- 
ence. 

4. Radio's ability to lure marginal 
audiences — out-of-home (including au- 
tomobile), secondary sets and so on. 

5. Radio's ability to adjust costs to 
changes in audience delivery. 



(>. Radio's resourcefulness in de- 
veloping high circulation, low cosl 
techniques. 

7. Degree to which ownership ami 
use "I home radio sets continues to 
i i< \ elop. 

\ll things considered, sharp vigi- 
lance i- necessai \ in unlet to keep cui • 
rent with today's \er\ fluid media 
situation. 



49TH b MADISON 

[Continued Irani page I!!' 

WBAY-TV STUDY 

\\ c would be glad to have all further 
details you may have on the \\ iscon- 
sin study ["How far out does a t\ 
station sell?" 3 May 1954, page 38], 
which appears to be an extremely in- 
teresting one. 

Richard (i. Blaine 

Manager Radio-'/ r Dept. 
Raymond Spector Co. 
New York 

• A preliminary report on r I • . Wisconsin stud) 
appeared In the .'* >l;i> I«>."»| i>-.u<-. Results prob- 
ably will not be published until late this year. 



CLOTHING CASE HISTORIES 

Do you have am television result 
stories for men's furnishing and de- 
partment stores? We would appreciate 
anything your research department 
can dig up. 

Jon\ Sinclair 
Sales Dept. 
WCHS, Charleston 

• SPONSOR'S Readers' Service Dept. is glad to 
furnish readers with titles and dates of case 
histories and re-ult "tori^- in specific product 
categories. 



INTERNATIONAL SECTION 

We have noted that in your fine sec- 
tion on International Radio and Tv 
[28 June 1954, page 41] many au- 
thorities recommended program buys 
abroad. 

We, however, have found the use of 
radio spot announcements the most ef- 
fective single selling tool for consumer 
products in international advertising. 
Furthermore it seems to be equally ef- 
fective in all markets. Commercial 
television is beginning to emerge 
throughout the world, particularly in 
Latin America, but radio is still the 
top medium and the spot announce- 
ment, despite the common abuse of 
multiple spotting in the same hour, re- 
mains the best seller. 

Among our clients using radio spots 



12 JULY 1954 



..ii ,i w ide and intensive - ale an 1 1 
den for Klirn milk. < rudo, Hemo and 
Instant I offee ; I ievei Bros. Co foi 
Kin-.. Blue, I afebuoy , Lux I oilel Soap, 
Pepsodent; Quakei * >.ii- Co. I"i Quak- 
ei Oats; Griffin Mfg. Co. Eoi \P.< 
Polish, Liquid Wax and Ulwite; Lam- 
bert for I jstefine Antiseptic ; Norv ich 
foi Pepto-Bismol and Vmolin. 

\\ e plan- and supei \ ise Ii hours ol 
radio and five and one-hall hours ol 
lele\ ision programs abroad weekly 
along with spot announcement cam- 
paigns in both media totaling more 
than 325,000 spots annually . 

We well realize the great values "I 
radio and television programs and it is 
our feeling that all programs should 
be designed t" meet the special needs 
of the products advertised on them. 
We are more impressed 1>\ good rat- 
ings for programs aimed directly at 
the buyers of the products advertised 
than b\ high ratings for -hows \vhi< h 
just have large, undefined audiences. 
Our client Esterbrook Pen Co. has a 
great potential sale to school young- 
sters. To meet the special interest of 
these buyers we developed a radio pro- 
gram series called Esterbrook Goes to 
School which features a visit each 
week to a different high school. The 
series has proved phenomenally popu- 
lar with strong sales results. Ester- 
brook plans to expand the series into 
many additional markets. 

W ith the advent of commercial tele- 
vision in markets overseas we have 
been consistently on the alert for 
adapting successful radio programs 
into this medium. Lever Bros, has 
just authorized placement of a tele- 
vision series over W K. \Q-TV, San 
Juan. Puerto Rico, based upon their 
radio series Los Jibaros. This series 
has been on radio for 23 years and it 
is our high hope that this record will 
be equaled or exceeded in television. 

W e feel that merchandising of radio 
and television campaigns is one of the 
most significant factors in selling. Ml 
the tricks of selling must be used to 
support the regular advertising. In 
Puerto Rico an offer of chinaware con- 
taining the picture of "The Last Sup- 
per" was extended over a daily radio 
serial drama and over the FavoriU 
Story sfiow on television. This offer 
has provided plenty of goodwill for the 
Borden name. 

James G. Zea 

Director of Radio and Tv 

\atl. Export Advertising Service 

Neic York 

265 




WCOV-TV 

Montgomery, Alabama 

"CRADLE OF THE CONFEDERACY" 

PROGRAMS 

WCOV-TV is a primary CBS 
affiliate but we also 
carry top flight programs 
from ABC, DuMont & NBC. 
34 live studio shows are 
featured weekly on WCOV-TV. 

VIEWERS 

We're 85 miles from the 
nearest television competition. 
Conversion is practically 100% 
and set ownership is almost 
40%. 

AVAILABILITIES 

We'll have to admit that 
the spot next to "I Love Lucy" 
and the "Pabst Fights" are 
gone but we still have some 
choice ones left. 

ASK ANY RAYMER 
OFFICE FOR DETAILS 




ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE 

SPONSOR— 12 JULY 1954 



AMERICAN TELEPHONE 4 TELEGRAPH 185 
ASCAP 250 

BATTEN. BARTON. DURSTINE & 0SB0RN 9 
BLAIR TV 87 

BONDED FILM STORAGE 98 

BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 141 

CBS TV NETWORK 126. 127 

CFCF. MONTREAL 30 

CFRB. TORONTO 208 

CIAT. TRAIL. B C 208 

CKLW. DETROIT 109 

DON LEE NETWORK 261 

DON LEE O&O STATIONS 213 

DU MONT NETWORK 143 

FILMACK TRAILER CORP. 144 

FREEMANTLE OVERSEAS RADIO I TV 221 
GENERAL TELERADI0 193 

GEORGIA TRIO 257 

HOUSTON CO-OP 16. 17 

KARK-TV. LITTLE ROCK 149 

KATV. PINE BLUFF 89 

KBIG. AVALON. CALIF 10 

Kr-RS. SAN FRANCISCO 249 

KCMO-TV. KANSAS CITY 153 

KCOH. HOUSTON 16. 17 

KCOR. SAN ANTONIO 66 

KDKA. PITTSBURGH 202.203 

KDON. SALINAS 2J 

K*DO WICHITA 102 

KELO-TV. SIOUX FALLS 100 

KERN. BAKERSFIELD 21 

KEX. PORTLAND. ORE. 202.203 

KEYSTONE NETWORK 174 

KFAB. OMAHA ..._ 245 

KFBK. SACRAMENTO 21 

KFRC. SAN FRANCISCO ..... 213 

KFYO, LUBBOCK 194 

KFYR-TV. BISMARCK 76 

KfiA. <5POKANF 233 

KGB. SAN DIEGO 213 

KGBS. AM & TV. SAN ANTONIO 114. 115 

KGEO-TV. ENID. OKLA. 72 

KGER. LONG BEACH 12 

KGGF. COFFEYVILLE. KANS. . 15 

KGNC. AMARILLO 85 

KGUL-TV. GALVFST1N 106 

KGVO-TV. MISSOULA. MONT. 78 

KHJ. LOS ANGELFS 213 

KHOL-TV. KEARNEY. NEB. 148 

KID-TV. IDAHO FALLS 93 

KIFN. PHOENIX 68 

KIWW. SAN ANTONIO 206 

KJEO. FRESNO 18 

Ki P«. S»N ANTONIO 223 

KLOK. SAN JOSE 204 

KMJ. FRESNO 21 

KMPC. LOS ANGELES 241 

KMTV. OMAHA 84 

KNUZ. HOUSTON 16. 17 

KPX. LOS ANGELES _ FC 

KOA. DENVER _ 226 

KOB-TV. ALBUQUERQUE 94 

KOH. RENO 21 

KOLN-TV. LINCOLN 155 

KOMA. OKLAHOMA CITY 263 

K1WH. OMAHA 217 

KPHO-TV. PHOENIX 153 

KPRC. HOUSTON 16. 17. 19 

KRBC-TV. ABILENE . 152 

KRON-TV. SAN FRANCISCO 97 

KSDO. SAN DIEGO 20 

KSL-TV. SALT LAKE CITY .... 110 

KSO. DES MOINES 210 

KTHS. LITLE ROCK 5 

KTHT. HOUSTON 16. 17 

KTNT. TACOMA 121 

KTRH. HOUSTON 16. 17 

KTUL. TULSA . 216 

KTVH, HUTCHINSON 96 

KTVU. STOCKTON 95 

KUDL. KANSAS CITY 200 

KUDNER AGENCY. INC 67 

KUTV. SALT LAKE CITY 147 

KWFT-TV. WICHITA FALLS. TEXAS 123 

KWBB. WICHITA 206. 210 

KWG. STOCKTON 21 

KWIJ. PORTLAND. ORE. 208 

KWTV. OKLAHOMA CITY 163 

KXYZ. HOUSTON . 16. 17 

KYOK. HOUSTON 16. 17 

KYW. PHILADELPHIA 202.203 

MrCANN-ERICKSON. INC 70. 71 

McCLATCHY BROADCASTING CO. 21 

MEREDITH TEIEVISION STATIONS 153 

MOTION PICTURES FOR TELEVISION 191 

MTVIELAB FIIM LABORATORIES 122 

MUSIC CORPORATION OF AMERICA 13 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 32.33 

NBC TV NETWORK 50. 51 

PRECISION FILM LAB 182 



RCA ENGINEERING 58. 59 
RCA RECORDED PROGRAM SERVICE 64. 65 

SARRA. INC 63 

SCOTT HENDERSON AGENCY 218 

SONG ADS 146 

SRDS 267 

STARS INC.. ATLANTA 200 

STEINMAN STATIONS 3 

STORER BROADCASTING CO. 114. 115 
TELEVISION PROGRAMS OF AMERICA 22.23 

WAFB-TV. BATON ROUGE 62 

WAGA AM *. TV. ATLANTA 114. 115 

WAVE-TV. LOUISVILLE 173 

WBAY-TV. GREEN BAY 25 

WBFN. BUFFALO 57 

WBNS. COLUMBUS 6I 

WBRC AM 4 TV. BIRMINGHAM 114. IIS 
WCAO. BALTIMORE 

WCBS-TV. NEW YORK 104. 105 

WCOV-TV. MONTGOMERY 266 
WDAN. DANVILLE. ILL. 
WDBJ. ROANOKE 
WDTV. PITTSBURGH 

WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING CO. 202.203 

WFAA. DALLAS 2 « 
WFAA-TV. DALLAS 
WFBC-TV. GREENVILLE 

WFBM. INDIANAPOLIS 247 
WGAL-TV. LANCASTER .-. 
WGAR. CLEVELAND 

WGBS. MIAMI ■"*• " 5 
WGR. BUFFALO 



WGSM. HUNTINGTON. N. Y. 
WHAM. ROCHESTER 
WHBF-TV. ROCK ISLAND 
WHDH. BOSTON 
WHEN-TV. SYRACUSE 

WHIO-TV. DAYTON 

WHO. DES MOINES 
WIBW. TOPEKA 
WIBW-TV. TOPEKA 

WICU-TV, ERIE 

WIOD. MIAMI 
WIP. PHILADELPHIA 
WIS-TV. COLUMBIA 
WISH-TV. INDIANAPOLIS 
WISN. MILWAUKEE 
WJAC-TV. JOHNSTOWN 
WJAR-TV. PROVIDENCE 
WJBK-TV. DETROIT 
WJPS. EVANSVILLE 
WJW. CLEVELAND 
WKBN-TV. YOUNGSTOWN 
WKMF. FLINT 
WKOW. MADISON 
WKZOTV. KALAMAZOO 
WLBC-TV. MUNCIE 
WLS. CHICAGO 
WMBG. RICHMOND 
WMIN-TV. MINNEAPOLIS 
WMT. CEDAR RAPIDS 
WMTW. PORTLAND. ME. 
WMURTV. MANCHESTER. 
WNAO-TV. RALEIGH 
WNAX. YANKTON 
WNBQ. CHICAGO 
WNBW. WASHINGTON 
WNHC-TV. NEW HAVEN 
WOI-TV. AMES 
WOOD-TV. GRAND RAPIDS 
WOW. OMAHA 
WOWO. FORT WAYNE 
WPEN. PHILADELPHIA 
WPRO. PROVIDENCE 
WPTZ-TV. PHILADELPHIA 
WQXR. NEW YORK 
WREN. TOPEKA 
WREX-TV. ROCKFORD 
WRGB. SCHENECTADY 
WSAZ. HUNTINGTON 
WSB-TV. ATLANTA 



227 

II 

150 

129. 140 
153 

113 

29 
220 

157 

77 
214 

228 

86 

55 

201 

116 

14 



SI. H4. 115 
206 
178 
169 
209 
204 
158 
18 
34 

I FC 

53 



N. H. 



WSJSTV. WINSTON-SALEM 

WSOK. NASHVILLE 

WSPD AM 4. TV. TOLEDO 

WSYR. SYRACUSE 

WTIC. HARTFORD 



I BC 

125 
90 

128 
69 

81 

80 
145 
79 
171 
. 235 
202. 203. 239 

177 

205 

202. 203 

212 

225 

187 

91 
218 
103 
124 



210 



114. 115 
207 



WTOP. WASHINGTON 
WTPA. HARRISBURG 
WTTV. BLOOMINGTON 
WTVP. DECATUR 
WVET. ROCHESTER 
WWDC. WASHINGTON 
WWJ-TV. DETROIT 
WWRL. NEW YORK 
WWTV. CADILLAC. MICH. 
WWVA. WHEELING 
WXEL. CLEVELAND 
WXYZ-TV. DETROIT 
ZIV TV PROGRAMS INC. 




87 
6. 7 



266 



SPONSO 




Agency and client • 

behind closed doors • 
hopping on the schedule • 
your medium, your market 
are mentioned • a question 
is raised • the agency man 
reaches for Standard Rate . . . 

Brother, what a grand feeling to know that 



you are 



in a Service-Ad near your listing. 



For the full story on the values 1.161 media get from their 
Service-Ads, see Standard Rate's own Service-Ad in the 
front of all SRDS monthly editions; or call a Standard Rate 
Service-Salesman. 

Note: According to a study of SRDS use made by National Analysts, 
Inc.. 83% of all account men interviewed have SRDS available at 
meetings in clients' office. 




Fall Facts: 1954 

I in M .1 LO-man i and woman > edi- 
torial -i. ill loose foi a month to six 
weeks on .1 project a- challenging a* 
the fall radio and t\ picture and j ou re 

bound t le up h itli something 

ivorthw hile. 

"Ili i — year's Fall Facts issue I mir 
1 ighth 1 comes i" 268 pages, as againsl 
236 last yeai and <"'! pages in 1947, 
our first Mil h issue. Perhaps no other 
yardstick could -how so graphically 
not onl) the growth of the air indus- 
ii\ these past eight years but also the 
acceptance ol these Fall Facts issues 
as "use handbooks |i>r fall l>u\ ing b\ 
agencies and advertisers. 

What's in these 268 pages tliis year 
thai should make you drop everything 
the moment you gel the issue and start 
reading? \ glance at the index on 
page 8 w ill tell you. 

\- for the trends the sponsor staff 
has uncovered, you'll find them de- 
tailed in tln> lead article pages 35 to 
37. fliese are three kej ones, as we 
see it : 

1 . I he skj r<>: keting growth of t\ , 
which has made thr surge nf even 



olhei medium |>al<- into insignificance 
when compared with it. Stations ap- 
proai hin:; the I" 11 mark. * loloi about 

1 me in to set ofl another frenz) (if 

ex< itement just as most people are 
getting used in black-and-white. \<l- 
vertisera seeking new ways t" use this 
d\ naniii new medium. 

2. Radio's increasing values, parti) 
through network rate cuts, parti] 
through the astonishing sale of new 
sets and parth through the rising < osta 
11I competitive media, including t\. 
wTiatevei radio's long-term future, it is 
tnila\ the "id\ truK universal mass 
medium in the country 1 98. '■'>'< satu- 
ration 1 . 

3. The increasing awareness of 
both air media on the part of national, 
regional and local advertisers. The 
figures show radio and t\ increasing 
in billings at a greater rate than news- 
papers hi magazines. This will con- 
tinue as color gives tv the one exclu- 
sive feature that magazines have capi- 
talized on in the past. 

For the thousand and one tips on 
what's happening in the radio and tv 
fields, as well a- what's going to hap- 
pen tin- fall and winter, you'll not onl) 
want In -kini through the entire issue 
njdit now hut also file it to refer to 
again and again. 

As usual Radio Basics. Tv Basics 
and. for the first time. Film Basics will 
be reprinted and available to you at 
nominal cost. 



A wise decision 

The decision of the "\ AIM B's Tele- 
vision Hoard and the Television Adver- 
tising Bureau (Ta \Hi to merge plans 
for a single all-industn tv sales promo- 
tion bureau instead of beating ea< h 
other - brains out was a wise one. 



I he industrj would have suffered 
had two t\ bureaus been set up. 

lime i- vital, however. I he bureau 
ghould get functioning as booh as pos- 
sible. I he entire industr) needs the 
facts, figures and data that onl) a 
strong t\ bureau supported 1>\ ever) t\ 
station and network can ^i\e it. SPON- 
SOR i- glad the breach between the two 

g 1 oups has been closed. 

Meantime the -eparate \ \RTB- 

sponsored i\ county-by-count) Bet cen- 
sus and circulation surve) Bhould move 

forward at full -peed. 

♦ # # 

"Tv radio" 

Jack Gould, the Vetl) ) ork Times' 
radio-t\ reporter, created a buzz of 
excitement in the Bi^: < -i t \ recentl) 
when he devoted a full column to "'t\ 
radio." He revealed that for the past 
year he's had a four-tub:- fin mobile 
radio that tune- onl) the sound chan- 
nel- ol New 1 ork's seven \ ideo sta- 
tions. The listening, he says, i> far su- 
perior to ordinarj radio fare, the pace 
being -lower and more realistic, the 
"acting" superior and the programs far 
more exciting than network radio -. es- 
pecialb at night. He suggested that 
set makers could turn out "t\ radio" 
-ei- for perhaps (25. 

Long before the column appeared, a 
network president told sponsor that 
radio network- ma) have to become 
adjuncts to tv networks to survive. 

SPONSOR doe- not share this belief. 
Uthough there is a place for '"tv ra- 
dio."' SPONSOR regards radio as a me- 
dium -eparate and distinct from A\ ' 
others, with programing qualifications 
of its own. 

"'T\ radio." while a happ) develop- 1 
ment for specialized purposes, should 
not be confused with radio as a prime ' 
advertising medium. 



Applause 



)ake Evans' new book 

Not often does a I k come out 

u 1 iiien for one group that can be re - 
ommended for another. 

Jake I vans Selling un</ Promoting 
Padio and Television 1- just su h a 
book. < )l>\ iousl) w 1 itten for the time 
and progi am salesman, it 1 an be read 
with profit b) ever) advertiser and 
agero ) man mi rested in the ait media. 

Reason : lake I \ ans is \ l!( - direi - 



i"i o! national advertising and promo- 
tion. 

\- example- of what should pro\e 

"I especial interest to admen are the 
two chapters "Selling Radio in a Tele- 
vision Market' and "'What Television 
< (ffers the Advertiser." 

I he ln-t li-t- six exclusive features 
enjoyed b) radio, including radio's 
abilit) to sell people who do not read 
magazines 01 newspapers. 

\- for television, Jake make- three 



points about the medium: 

« It offers the advertiser more sale 
of his product. 

• It offer- him greater public knowl- 
edge of his product 

• It offers him more prestige for his 
compan] . 

The 348-page book ' with index 1 w; 
published at $5.95 b) Printer-' li 

Publishing Co. It's so well done \ou" 

want a cop) . 



268 



SPONSOR 



i is ( 
I 




fight-blooming hiatus 

his flower's in season again. It 
Urinates, in a negative way, 
I h every petal an unspent 
(Inch of bucks. 



|t it's papier mache, superfi- 
; llv attractive, intrinsically 
I icherous as henbane, without 
Wits, obnoxious as poison ivy. 
Me immediate effects are tem- 

•fary, though there are cases on 
9 >rd where audiences 
1 er been recovered. 

1 ough found largely in network 
gramming, where it has been 
to run wild, the n.b. hia- 
occasionally found west of 
Mississippi, even in Iowa. 

, tsk. 



WMT & WMT-TV 

< BS loi 1 .i-ui n Iowa 
Mail Iddress: Cedar Rapids 
National Reps: The Katz \gency 




and not maybe! 



WWDC (MBS) 22.5% 



Station "A" 14.6% 



Station "B" 11.2% 



Sta."C" 8.3% 



" 5.7% 



" 5.7% 



4.5% 




3.9% 



In Out -of -Home Audience 

This is a survey — not just an opinion. 

PULSE made it— February, 1954— of the huge 

out-of-home radio audience in Washington, D. C. 

WWDC has this big extra bonus audience locked up tight. 

About one-quarter of this entire listening audience sets 

its dial to WWDC — and stays there, day and night. 

WWDC is dominant 77' , of the time. 

What are your plans for selling the 

always-rich Washington market? You can hardly 

do without WWDC. Get the whole story about this sales-producing 

station from your John Blair man. 



2.8% 



In Washington, D.C. it's 



2-6% 



Represented Nationally 




The Pult; tnt. Deport: Winter, I9J4. 



bP » 2- 

MI52 MIL I JOY 

H C-ROOM 274 

3 ROCKEFtlU PH2* 

K t V.* V ' • ■ "> N V 



e magazine radio and tv <•.. d 



26 JULY 1954 



50< per copy* $ 8 per year 



^ MiLUOM 

ththz 

OOIO COAST 
GULF COAST 



\Gt\ from New Orleans to Mobile 
^kOt\ from Baton Rouge to Lafayette 
l\QH from Lake Charles to Orange 

yf CffC frorn Houston t0 Cor P us ctlfisti 



/ 



FIRST 

IN NEW 
ORLEANS 



First among 
all independents 
during Negro 
Programming 
Period. 



RECEIVED 

JUL 2 6 1^54 



NBC CEMERAL LIBRARY 



l 



g.rnming to the mass audience of 4 million, in- 
mj; 1,250,000 Negroes with Negro and Hillbilly 
gamming by radio personalities supported by in- 
merchandising and promotion. An unbeatable 
ic!>argain. 




Represented by Forioe and Co. for Louisiana Stations, by John E. Pearson Co. for Houston 






ARE YOU 
AFRAID? 

page 31 

Auto insurance: net 
radio helps build 
State Farm name 

page 34 



I. How top agencies buy 
media: the group 
approach at B&B 

page 36 



Albuquerque 
chain battles 
giants with r 

page 39 



10 ways to put 
more sell in your 
ty commercials 

page 40 



How well can uhf 
sell? Result stories 
give tangible evidence 

page 42 






air: tv demonstrations 
aid sales boom 

page 44 



_ 




You wouldn't harness an elephant 
to a lawnmower, would you? 



You don't need 50,000 watts or 10,000 or 
even 5000 to cover the compact Baltimore 
market! 

W-I-T-H will do the job for you — without 
waste! Network stations overlap areas covered 
by their own affiliates . . . their effective coverage 
is limited to just about the area W-I-T-H itself 
covers. 



NIELSEN SHOWS W-I-T-H IN LEAD! 

In Baltimore City and Baltimore County 
W-I-T-H leads every other radio and television 
station — network or independent — in weekly 
daytime circulation. 

Let your Forjoe man give you all the facts in 
this amazing Nielsen Coverage Service Survey. 



IN BALTIMORE 




TOM TINSLEY, PRESIDENT 



REPRESENTED BY FORJOE & CO: 



be 



Will TvAB 
'federated"? 



TvAB planners 
meet 4 August 



Campbell testing 
frozen soups 



Times' Could 
switches to CBS 



Toni starts 2nd 
product via air 



Media executives 
debate fear 




Admen who wonder "what's the problem" in setting up TvAB have to bear 
in mind television (like radio) is 3 media — not one. Stations depend 
on 3 sources for revenue: (1) networks; (2) sales to national and 
regional clients via national representatives; (3) sales to local 
clients. L atter 2 are vital to pay high opera ti ng costs. That's why 
as time nears for 5 August meeting in Washington to set up all-indus- 
try TvAB you hear of stations which want bureau to concentrate only 
on all-important spot and local sales. Possible solution: federated 
bureau with separate branches for network, spot, local. See edi- 
torial page 108. 

-SR- 
At special meeting in Washington 4 August (day before 10-man TvAB 
organizing session) 4 prime movers in projected tv bureau will hammer 
out agenda. Men are: Clair McCollough, Roger Clipp, Cam Arnoux, Dick 
Moore. 

-SR- 
Watch for a major tv-radio splash by Campbell Soups this fall to pro- 
mote new line of frozen concentrated soups. Product is currently 
being test-marketed in 3 Eastern cities, including Philadelphia 
(right across Delaware river from Camden home plant). Extensive tv 
spot campaign, plus daytime rad i o announcemen t s, combined with large- 
space newspaper ads is current formula. Agency: Leo Burnett, Chicago. 

-SR- 
Jack Gould, radio-tv editor of "New York Tiroes" and frequent critic of 
over-commercialism in air advertising, has been named Information Ad- 
viser to CBS, Inc. He'll report to Frank Stanton at policy level. 

-SR- 
Toni launched Viv, lipstick, with $5 million first-year budget in 
May — most of it going into radio, tv. Next month "largest ad appro- 
priation ever placed" for facial cleansing lotion will kick off "Deep 
Magic," again with radio, tv carrying brunt of campaign. Firm had 19 
shows, will carry 22 radio quarter hours weekly, 21 on tv by October. 
Agencies: Weiss & Geller, Tatham-Laird, Leo Burnett, all Chicago. 

-SR- 
Edward B. Pope, media director of James Thomas Chirurg Co., Boston, 
says he not only has no fears regarding his job or future, but he 
does not use PIB data in making media selections, challenges authen- 
ticity of rating services for all types of media and says of SPONSOR'S 
3 May article, "III. Psychology of Media — why admen buy what they 
do": "Should be read by everyone who really wishes to be an ad man in- 
stead of an accountant." For debate on "Are YOU afraid?" see page 31. 



Bernard Piatt SPONSOR general manager; Miles David named editorial director 

In two major staff promotions, SPONSOR announces elevation of Bernard Piatt, 
for the past five years Business Manager, to General Manager; and Miles David, 
for the past four years Managing Editor, to Editorial Director. The Editorial 
Board of SPONSOR will consist of Norman Glenn, Editor and Publisher, Mr. Piatt 
and Mr. David. In addition Mr. Piatt will supervise all departments. 



SPONSOR. Volume 8, No. 15. 26 .Ttilv 1954. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. M.I. Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Cir- 
culation Offices id E 4nth St.. New York 17 $s a year in L*. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. nostoffice under Act of 3 March 1879 



•tll'OKI TO SI'ONSOICS lor 26 Jnl> I ?».", { 



Mogul, SRA in 
rate battle 



Kent goes king 
with radio, tv 



Farm radio, spot 
and local, surges 



NBC shows why 
you need radio 



Uhf moves goods 
for many lines 



Round 3 in current battle between £mil Mogul Co. and Station Reps. 
Assn. will be fought 28 July at Biltmore in New York when Emil Mogul, 
at SRA invitation, will discuss reps' "imperfections." Round 1 was 
SRA letter to members accusing Mogul of trying to skip reps and deal- 
ing directly with stations to get lower, local rates for Rayco account 
and of sending timebuyers on road to make "deals." Round 2 was Mo- 
gul's reply at Waldorf Astoria before 60 reps and press in mid-July. 
He said Rayco was local, not national account, offered $10,000 to an y 
charity if someone could get station to testify under oath he tried 
to break rate card. 

-SR- 
Credit cancer scare and massive use of network, spot tv, network 
radio for major share in doubling Kent sales (P. Lorillard) first 5 
months this year. Cigarette stresses "Micronite" filter. Kent went 
k ing size this month with no increase in price. Regular Kents will 
also be continued. To pave way commercials were revised on these 
Kent radio, tv shows: "The Web" (CBS TV), "Monday Morning Headlines" 
(ABC Radio) and "Kent Theatre" (was in 30 tv markets, now 6). Young 
& Rubicam is the agency. 

-SR- 
Phil Alampi, WNBC (NBC) farm & garden, radio-tv director, reports na- 
tional spending for farm radio has risen in spot radio from §2.7 mil- 
lion to $6.0 million (up 119%) and in local radio from 57. 7 million 
to $11.6 million (up 50%) past year. Alampi is chairman of Natl. 
Assn. of Tv and Radio Farm Directors committee which just issued di- 
rector y of all members, farm radio programs (compiled from SPONSOR'S 
"Program Guide") and firms interested in farm radio. 

-SR- 
You can get free Nielsen analysis of your tv advertising, combined 
with recommended complementary sked over NBC Radio, by writing to 
Howard Gardner, director NBC Radio Network sales development group. 
Latest NBC Radio promotion booklet says your tv show, if watched by 
every tv home in country, wou ld stil l miss 17.1 million homes or 37 °> 
of total. 

-SR- 

Can uhf sell? Furniture dealer spent $86.34 on single minute an- 
nouncement on WKNX-TV, Ch. 57 in Saginaw-Bay City, Mich. , sold 52,364 
worth of "Television Rockers." For other remarkable sales stories 
see uhf piece page 42. 



Dletv national spot radio and tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



An.itmt Co, Yonkcrs 

An.itmt Co. Yonkcrs 
Crovc Labs. St. Louis 

Lydia Pinkham Co. 

Lynn. Mass 
Pierce s Propru t 

Buffalo 

Whcatcna Corp. 

R.)hway, N| 



Super Anahist 

Super Anahisr 
Varied prods 

Lydia Pinkham 
Or Pierce's prods 
Whcatcna 



Ted Bates. NY 

Ted Bates. NY 
Harry B. Cohen. NY 

Harry B. Cohen. NY 



Over 100 radio stns thruout 

country 
Abt 40 tv mkts thruout country 
SO or more radio-tv stns thruout 

country 
East. Southeast mkts 



Kastor. Farrcll. Chcslcy 100 stns thruout country 
& Clifford. NY 



Bnsachcr. Wheeler & 
Staff NY 



25 radio stns 



Radio: early-morn mm anncts: 20 Sep; 

26 wks 
Tv: dayti mm anncts: 20 Sep: 26 wks 
Radio-Tv: anncts. A Oct-11 Oct. 20-22 

wks 
Radio: min anncts: IS Sep: 16 wks 

Radio: mm anncts: 27 Sep: 13 wks 

Radio: 5mm early am news progs: 7 
Sep: 26 wks 



SPONSOR 



WESTERN 

ROUNDUP pays off 

for the FISCHER, BAKI1TG COMPANY 



"There's something about a Western on TV that's intriguing. You know 
the marshal will 'get his man' for law and order must prevail. And still 
you look, and children look, and mothers look. The result — good results. 



That's why we recommended to our client, the FISCHER BAKING COM- 
PANY, that Westerns on TV sell merchandise; and we've proved it. 

For the last five years WATV's 'Western Roundup' has been used with 
good effect, and we plan to increase the schedule right after Labor Day. 



Keep shooting with your Westerns, but shoot only the bad hombres." 



Scheck Advertising Agency, Inc. 






WESTERN ROUNDUP: 

with Ranger Lyle Reed — Monday thru Sunday 4-5 pm 
TELEPULSEl 4.1 quarter-hour average January —June 



© 



c h a n n e I lPf WOtV 

covering metropolitan new york-new jersey 
TELEVISION CENTER, Newark 1, New Jersey Rep: Weed Television Corp. 

26 JULY 1954 




ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



\re vol' afraid? 

SPONSOR'S media study findings that fear plays a big role in admen's selec- 

tion of media brought a brace of controversial opinions from agency heads •» ' 



> it radio helps build the Stale Farm name 

The State Farm Automobile Insurance Co. wants to hit prospects repeatedly 
during the short time of their periodic interest in auto insurance. Two network 
radio shows achieve this purpose, get one-third of firm s budget «#4 

HMEBUYERS: I. The group approach 

This is the first in a series of three articles explaining the organization of three 
different types of media departments in top 20 agencies. Detailed this issue is 
the setup at Bentcn & Bowles which represents the "group approach'' •>© 



Local food <*liciin battles the giants with radio 

Barber's a supermarket chain in Albuquerque, spends 60% of its ad budget 
on local radio shows and weekend saturation announcements to compete in its 
area with the retail giants of the grocery industry «*" 



1 M«i/\ to put more sell in your tv t'ommereials 

Irving Settel, tv consultant and educator, analyzed some 400 video pitches with 
the aid of a student panel, comes up with some basic do's and don'ts in making 
commercials on television more effective #W 



If oh* well c€tn iih, sell? 

Recent headlines have been painting an often-dreary picture of uhf. SPONSOR 
takes a peek behind scenes, comes up with a fistful of solid results stories 
from advertiser use of the medium .JJ2 



Itotisseries on the air 

In the one year between 1952 and 1953, national broiler sales leaped from $13 
million to well over $72 million. The use of tv, largely for demonstration pur- 
poses, had much to do with this phenomenal sales rise .§.§ 



TIMEBUYERS 
AGENCY AD LIBS 
49TH & MADISON 
NEW & RENEW 



MR. SPONSOR, Albert Plaut 

P. S. 

NEW TV STATIONS 

NEW TV FILM SHOWS 

ROUND-UP 

FILM NOTES 



COMING 



RADIO RESULTS 

SPONSOR ASKS 

AGENCY PROFILE, Robert Orr 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SFONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glen 

Vice President & Gen. Mgr.: Be'-ard P 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad. Joan 

Marks, Keith Trantow 

Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 

Editorial Assistant: Karolyn Richman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Co'e 

Vice President and Advertising Director: 

ert P. Mendelson 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. C 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith (S 

west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Protju 

Manager), Ted Pyrch, Ed Higgins 

Circulation Department: Eve. Sata 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo. Morti 

Kahn, Kathleen Murphy 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearme 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



I hi tv: a status report 

A follow-un to th« pyo-oo^ning uhf results stories appearing in this issue (see 

above), will highlight the problems of uhf in timebuyer terms it ttfff. 

II lii; 100% of Doeskin's budget is in ratlio-tr 

This tissue manufacturer associates its name with Kate Smith on tv and Robert 

0- Lewis on radio, both network efforts; uses no other advertising 5> lllf/. 



1 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS * 
combined wllh TV. Executive. Edltorlil Clrculitl 
A,lverti»lng Offlcei : 49th & Midlion (40 E 4911 «-> 
New York IT. N. T Telephone: Mirny Hill H 
ChlrnKo Offlee: 1*1 E r>, n ,l Are Phone (")• 

I e Si 

dolph "3*1. « ■ - • : Boi 

1- \' . ■ ,. ■ Ti II . % 

- 
1'llltiM Slat, • • I'uilill in. I 

P I - \ \ liln is ill 

. N I 
SPONSOR PUf"* 
TIONS INC. 



don't U PICK BUND" 

IN SHREVEPORT! 




look at KWKH s HOOPERS! 



KWKH's radio competition consists of 
three network affiliates, plus one inde- 
pendent. But look at the Hooper-proved 
dominance of KWKH in Metropolitan 
Shreveport — morning, afternoon and 
night! 



JAN.-FEB., 1954 


-SHARE OF AUDIENCE 




TIME 


KWKH 


STATION B 


STATION C 


STATION D 


STATION E 


MON. thru FRI. 
8:00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon 


38.1 


19.5 


6.2 


16.0 


19.5 


MON. thru FRI. 
12:00 Noon - 6:00 P.M. 


44.3 


21.2 


9.2 


6.1 


19.4 


SUN. thru SAT. EVE. 

6:00 P.M. ■ 10:30 P.M. 


54.6 




11.2 


8.5 


24.0 



ook at KWKH'S SAMS AREA! 



50,000-watt KWKH obviously gives you far more than the 
Metropolitan area. KWKH is heard in 22.39r more daytime 
homes than all other Shreveport stations combined, and at 
the lowest cost per-thousand-listeners! 



i 'J 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radi 



The Bronham Co. 
Representatives 



Henry Clay 
General Manager 



Fred Watkins 
Commercial Manager 




LOUISIANA 



ARKANSAS 



Announcing the curtain-raiser in 




/ 













V 



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A Variety-Filled musical treat sparkling with 
"star-talk" of music, movies and show people. Saus -b*ight, 

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STAR VOCALISTS! 

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V / 

FASCINATING DIALOGUE! 



Never in the history of library service has anyone dared to 
make an offer like this. Mail Coupon below for full details. 



«re * h ° n 

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h a v e ° tT sTM toNS 



WORU> 



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PROGRAM SERVICE 

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WORLD BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC. 

488 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York 

MriNNiTI ^-^ I , ^ HOUYWO< 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES . . . ALL-CANADA RADIO, 
FACILITIES LIMITED, VICTORY BUILDING, TORONTO m 



WORLD BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC 

488 Madison Ave. 

New York 22, N.Y. 

Rush money -making details of yoor 

NEW COMET PLAN. 

(YOUR NAME ANO TITLE) 
(COMPANY NAME) 



(COMPANY ADPRESS) 




IT 

WAS 

KBIG 

NEWS 




for a year-old station to win 
A 1953 TOP AWARD 

Now it's headline news as . . . KBIG 
AGAIN WINS NEWS AWARD. 

The Radio and Television News Club 
of Southern California judges the 
hourly five minute strips "Listen to 
Lisser" to be 

"The Best News Reporting of 
any non-network radio station." 

KBIG and the John Poole Broadcasting 
Company are grateful to the News 
Club, to United Press, to program di- 
rector and newscaster Alan Lisser, 
news director Larry Berrill, writer 
Margee Phillips, the entire Hollywood 
and Avalon announcing staffs, to the 
advertisers and their agencies who 
make it all possible. 

"Music, news, time all day long". 




10,000 WATTS 
AT740 



KBIG 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 




GIANT 

ECONOMY 

PACKAGE OF 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

RADIO 



The Catalina Station 
John Poole Broadcasting Co. 

KBIF • KBIG 
6540 Sunsut Blvd.. Hollywood 28, Calif. 

HOIIywood 3-3205 
Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker Assoc, Inc. 






f><i»ii<>f S. Heath, media director, Hazard Adver- 
tising Co., Veil York, handles the media strategy 
anil planning for accounts spending some $3 million 
a year, it the same tune, he arts as all-media 
buyer, choosing jrom among availabilities and actually 
placing iinlers. "Recently I put most of Bridgeport 
Brass C'o.'.s budget into radio" he told sponsor. 
"As a maker oj insecticides this firm uas interested 
iii cheap national coverage throughout the summer, 
lie wanted to reach people at the same time as 

the mosquitoes do, s<; it r l/ought nighttime radio." 



flomia tfuigley. radio-ti director, (.a) ton, \eu 
) ork, has become a boxing expert from her work in 
placing Greatest Fights ol the Century, a la-minute 
ti film show, in some 00 markets lor (.hesebrough 
Vaseline Products. "We found that the best time 
lor us is right alter live boxing or wrestling 
matches." Donna told SPONSOR. "At these late-evening 
limes we get the audience we want tor our produrt 
I mainly male, but some women), and we find the 
audience keyed to our message." This psychological 
,m tor is also lital in slotting announcements. 



Donald Foote Jr.. Hen ion & Routes. \eu 
York, feels that nighttime spot ti announcements 

are an excellent medium for putting across short- 
term sales promotion plans or for the introduction 
of new products. "Tin \ don't replace network tv 
programing, with its prestige value," he added. 
"Rather. the\ supplement it. Because ol spot tv's 
flexibility an advertiser run completely tailor 
his frequency impact to the special needs in 
a particular market, or he can vary his copy 
theme b\ regions or marker conditions." 



Jack McCarthy. Ted Hates. New ) ork. looks 
forward to the day when all the ti stations in the 
ioiintr\ will get together to sponsor an impartial 
survey about themselves. " A truly objective 
survey" says Jack. "Today it's still difficult to 
get a single reliable source lor a station's i overage 
area and set counts within its market. And. 
even it a Inner feels he has a reliable source of 
information foi one station, he mat find it hard 
to compare this data with that provided by a com- 
peting station bci nuse the two use different survc | 5. 



SPONSOR 



Coverage v-.. 
that counts ! 



...in rich, industrial, oursrate Michigan 



WW 
100,000 

WATTS 





WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 



Leads 
the 

NIK II II II! 

KPQ's N.C.S. AREA 
W) GIVES YOU 

ftp- i ^ 

tacorne\ 



2 



retail 
sales 

fastest grow^ 



and 



ncreasi.-_ 
marker. 



farm 



5000 WATTS 
560 K. C. 
WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 



Reg. Rep.- Hugh Felt-is, Seattle. Wash. 
Natl. Rep.- Forjoe h Company, Inc . 




10 



by Hob Foreman 

Even the most intense research hater among us would have 
to, in all fairness, admit there are a few pearls to be pried 
from tin' common shells laid at our feet b\ the practitioners 
of Statistical \\ isdom and Second Guess ing. 

Not the least of these is the fact that the \<-\\ presence <>l 
the Numbers Merchants keeps a writer on his toe- and forces 
those who O.K. cop3 to be more alert than perhaps might be 
the case were no one keeping tabs. 

The presence ol researchers also causes u> to review the 
rules oi the obvious as we look over a storyboard or piece of 
radio copy — a chore that can onlv serve a good purpose for 
what i- obvious is mote direct and that usually make- for a 
better commercial. 

On the other >ide. statistical evidence gi\e- us a little more 
strength with which to stand up and argue against the merely 
novel, the bizarre for bizarre"- purpose, and the too-too-clever 
which mien- are bound to creep into our work because copy- 
writers and commercial artists are -<> inhibited by the fad 
they must be business men. 

De-pite all these pluses it i- -till distressing to see how- 
much reliance is placed upon the edict- of research folks and 
how rigidly copy i- being held up to them and their criteria. 

Having been subjected to this painful process for mam 
years as a copywriter. I have come up with some conclu- 
sions on how to a— ure any advertiser that his commercial 
will rate high in Playback, Recall. Believability Quotient or 
whatever word game he may be playing at the time. It doesn't 
matter which of the techniques i- applied against it — my 
Jilfv Ad-Kit will assure you of coming out well. 

It i- necessary to state here, however, that it"- possible a 
high rating on the chart will have no bearing on whether the 
commercial will do the job it is supposed to — -i.e.. -ell the 
product. 

Got paper and pencil? All right — first, get one simple 
thought lor your commercial. Now — express this thought in 
the simplest of term- a\u\ the shortest of phrases. Vvoid the 
catchy il it i- at all cryptic. He straightforward to the point 
of (Inline-- and a- direct a- the man in an Esquire cartoon. 

In radio- express it with a sound gimmick. In tv — use 
some visual device to set up this thought — perhaps, scratch- 
oil or a wipe on or maybe unscrambling animation, 
i f'l<-ns< turn to page • 

SPONSOR 



ilOW TELECASTING 




ST. LOUIS 



100,000 WATTS 

OVER 600,000 SETS IN THIS AREA 
ANTENNA HEIGHT 563 FEET 




Represented Nationally by 

THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



26 JULY 1954 



11 



Use Columbia Pari tic Radio and 



REDISCOVER THE WEST! 



Westward bound? Team up with the Columbia 
Pacific Radio Network. You'll discover CPRN 
carries the most weight throughout today's 
$20-billion Pacific Coast market. And there are 

four sound reasons why : 

RADIO IS EVEN MORE POPULAR ON THE COAST 

than it is nationally. Westerners spend an 
average of 17.3' r more time with radio than the 
national average. 

CPRN MATCHES POWER TO POPULATION. Only 

CPRN has the Balanced Coverage to match the 
Coast's spread-and-cluster pattern. . .maximum- 
power stations where population is spread out 
(example: the Los Angeles market covers 
an area the size of Connecticut) and moderate- 



power stations in areas where population is 
concentrated in smaller clusters. As a result of 
this Balanced Coverage, day and night more 
families listen to CPRN, in total, than listen 
to any other West Coast network. 

CPRN HAS THE LARGEST SHARE of the radio 

audience in the West year after year. And 
CPRN's audiences are more than 6'^ larger 
today than in 1948, before television. 

ADVERTISERS ARE AWARE OF THESE FACTS. 

As a result, CPRN carries more business than 
any other West Coast network ! 
Give you a lift to the Coast? Call CBS Radio 
Spot Sales or THE COLUMBIA 

PACIFIC RADIO NETWORK 








^•arlwLOME 

















f] 



Want to reach 
the people in 
the Dakota area? 



-Grafton 




SoTJMVIK, 



Buy KXJB-TV 

FARGO — VALLEY CITY, N. DAK. 



Station B 
(Fargo) 
950 f 1 . 
433 ft. 
1383 ft. 
65 KW 



Compare! KXJB-TV 

Sea level 1410 ft. 

Ant, una 1085 ft. 

Above sea level 2495 ft. 
Power 100 KW 

Sin- "IV area App. 75 mi App. 52 mi 
Has.- "A" ran- $200 hr. $200-hr. 
I llatnul 4 6 

( liamiil 1. the state's choicest channel, 
was allocated to Valley City making it 
possible for KX,JB-TV with maximum 
power and 1085-ft. tower to cover 
Fargo-Moorhead, Grand Forks, Devils 
Lake Jamestown, Valley City, Wahpe- 
ton, Breckenridge and Crookston with 
a good solid 100 microvolt signal. 7 mar- 
keta for the price of one. (See map 

MARKET DATA: Over 135,000 urban 
and rural families within 50 M V M 
line. Average retail sales per household 
..' per vr. i urban and rural). Aver- 
age retail sales per household $(>794 
(Fargo trade area) — better aserage 
t ban such eii ies as Boston, !.<>s Angeles, 
I )e1 mil . M inneapolis. 

PROGRAM POLICY: Serving the pre- 

■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . i nt Dakota agricultural area 
with true "Farm Programming", 

KXJB-TV is ably assisted l>\ a pro- 
gram advisory hoard of tin- North 
Dakota State Agricultural College. 

REPRESENTED BY WEED TELEVISION 
SALES OFFICE: BOX 626, FARGO, N. D. 
PHONE 446-1 
NORTH DAKOTA BDCST. CO., INC. 

KSJB-600 K.C. JAMESTOWN, N. DAK. 
KCJB-910 K.C. MINOT, N. DAK. 
KCJB-TV CH. 13 MINOT, N. DAK. 



ftySXB" tV r^®S VA »BV CIT V-FAKGC MP. 
cnannii <£. \g/ 100,000 «vatts 



/ 



i 
MADISON 



bponbob invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 



MILK COOPERATIVE 

In \<>ur June I 1. L954 issue you had 
a wonderful stor) about the Inter-State 
Milk Producers' Cooperative and their 
successful activities on radio ["Radio 
make- hij:-< it\ friend- for dairv tann- 
ers," page 44] . 

Please xnd me two issues <>f that 
magazine as I would like to -end them 
to people who would he most inter- 
ested. 

K\ LNS (,. Olwell Jr. 
Gundlach Advertising 

Cincinnati 



• Fxtra copies of ihr 11 Juiii- i->u(* containing 
ihr Btorj on lh,- milk cooperative's u-«- of radio 
,,,-t .">o, apiece 



RATINGS 

We would like to ,^el permission to 
reprint the artirle b) J. B. Ward on 
page 40 of the Ma\ 31 sponsor ["I 
-a\ ratings are opinions""]. 

This is a stor\ that we have always 
preached and Mr. W ard's comments 
could he of help to us locally. 

Kenneth M. Cooper 
General Manager 
WORC, Worcester 

• Materia] which has appearrd in SPONSOR 
ma j In- reprinted provided permlsrion i* requested 
in writing and credit i* tii\ en. 



PROGRAM GUIDE 

We would appreciate \our sending 
us two copies of the Program Guide. 
W e did not receive our copy and 
would like to use them in the planning 
of our new advertising campaign. 
Sam Resnn k 
D'Franssia Laboratories 
Los Ingeles 



In borrowing a cliche from Walter 

W int hell. I would like to tOSS a dozen 
on hid- \ <>nr waj . 

Since sponsor's inauguration I've 

made no set i el of the great admiration 

[ ve held for your publication and 
sponsor's staff. This feeling has grown 
with each information-packed cop) of 



SPONSOR through the \ears. 

Today's orchids are sent for \our 
magnificent 1954 radio and t\ Btation 
Program Guide. It represents a pains- 
taking job of reporting classified ra- 
dio and t\ market- and will remain a 

treasured piece of research material to 
be used with meat relief h\ all mem- 
bers of the broadcasting industry. 

I shall recommend it- use most 
highly. 

Dexter I). Halle 

/ ice President & Director 

Cambridge School oj Radio 
and Ti Broadcasting 

\ eu ) orh 



\1\ hat's off t<> \ou for the new 1954 
radio and t\ station Program Guide. 
ju-t received. It's the first intelligent 
approach I have ever seen to our par- 
ticular type of specialized program- 
ing. . . . 

Robert \. Pinkerton 
KEO-XEOR 

Brou n\i Hie. Tex. 



• SPONSOR-. IV.-, I Prugram l.ui.lr i, available 
fr.'e In auliaerlbrr*. Kvlra ropi«-» ro*t $2 eai-h. 



SPONSOR REPRINTS 

I am a faithful reader of sponsor 
which arrives at our office regularly. 
It seems there is never enough time to 
devote to each i-sue and main times I 
have allowed an issue to get out of m\ 
hands before I have been ahle to fin- 
ish particular articles. 

Therefore. I would like to take ad- 
vantage of the offer h\ sponsor in the 
Ma\ 17 issue ""Can you use these 
SPONSOR reprints?"" page 54]. I am 
li-tinj: below the material that I would 
like to have. 

Jack Ow i n 

Radio and Television 
Foote. Gone & fielding 
Gliicago 

• For a complete li-i of rrprini availabilltlei 
and price*, please refer to ihr 17 Maj 19S4 a> 
-in-, page .» I. 



ALL-MEDIA BOOK 

Could we please reserve a cop) of 
your Mi-Media Stud] which is t" he 
published this coming summer? W e 
have found these articles verj inter- 

esting and would like a copj of the 
book when it is read\ . 

S. I!i SSELL 

The Baker Idvertising Igency 

Toronto 



14 



SPONSOR 




Jkm 




TON 





mw 



Anybody with that much wealth could buy all kinds of 
things. And, as a matter of fact, it just happens that the 
people who do have it do buy prodigiously. Their golden 
hoard is represented by its equivalent in green U. S. dollars 
— nearly four billion of them — which is the buying 
potential you'll find concentrated in an 116-county mint 
served by WSAZ-TV. 

The particular brand of alchemy practiced by nearly a 
million busy families who live in WSAZ-TV's area is 
called industry. Many of America's largest, best-known 
manufacturers keep our Ohio Valley communities 
humming with productivity. Heavy industrial production 
makes good profits . . . good profits make bigger payrolls 
...and bigger payrolls make people more buying-minded. 
As an advertiser with something to sell, you can take 
it from there. 

But you can take it faster (and in greater amounts) with 
the unique help of WSAZ-TV. Across this industrial heart 
of the nation... in over 400,000 TV homes... WSAZ-TV 
is the only single medium able to reach so much of 
this golden potential (and with a persuasive power that is 
paying off handsomely for dozens of happy advertisers). 
If this prosperous prospect intrigues you, the nearest 
Katz office can stake out all the facts. 





Huntington-Charleston, West Virginia 

Channel 3-100.000 watts ERP 

NBC BASIC NBTWORK-affiliated ABC and DuMont 

Also affiliated ivith Radio Stations WSAZ, Huntington, and WGKV. Charleston 

Lawrence H. Rogers, Vice President & General Manager, WSAZ, Inc. 

Represented nationally by The Katz Agency 







Li }f'"'%4#i 



26 JULY 1954 



15 




Prestige stations with but 
a single thought . . . 

RADIO! 



|f\l)l() i- everywhere. Radio i- in everj room of the house ... in mosl automobiles 
traveling the highways and citj streets . . . on tractors in the fields ... in garage-, stores, 

. . . in fact, wherever people work, rest or play! PEOPL E> BROAD* VSTING 
i ORPORATION is going t" buj more radio stations, because we believe in the future '>f radio 
as the greatest, mosl effective of all advertising media. Today. PB(i l>oa-t- four stations 
in t..ur rich American markets. Each is progiammed to reach -iili-ianii.il citizens 
with mone; to spend in t h<- market it serves. The) arc leaders all . . . prestige 
stations that sell effectively because thej represent the finest in radio. 

PEOPLES BROADI VSTINC CORPORATION is owned b> the three million policyholder 

owner- of the Farm Bureau Automobile Insurance Company, Columbus, Ohio. All PBC 
stations broadcast timely, interesting public service features. Fach -tation ha- won an impressive 
number of public service award-. Be-ides fulfilling its obligation to act in the public interest 
with such programming, each station retain- it- regional leadership h> constantly attracting 
public attention. PBC -tation- act on the principle that there is no distinct separation between 
commercial and public service radio . . . that to sell, a station must al-o serwe. The stature 
of all four PBC -tation- would seem to prove that principle valid. 



PEOPLES BROADCASTING CORP 



MURRAY D. LINCOLN, President 
HERBERT E. EVANS, V.P.-Gen. Mgr. 



m 
m 



WMMN- 



CBS 

5,000-920 



FAIRMONT. W, VA, REP, H.R, 

A. G. FERRISE. Gen. }lt f r. 



I (RSI -line 1928. In North ' entral Wesl Virginia. WMMN i- FIRST in coverage, power, penetration 
and FIRST in audience. WMMN i- the ONLJ station thai delivers this vital market. 



WTTM- 



NBC 

1,000-920 



TRENTON, N, J. REP, FORJOE 

FRED E. Itl It \s I I I V Manager 



Covering Central Nev, Jerse) and the Delaware Valley. Trenton i- the Huh in this \a-t industrial aria 

a population of 300,000 in the retail trading /one. plus 16.000 new home- in Levittown, I'a. and 
4,000 new home- in Fairless Hills, Pa. 



WRFD- 



IND. 

5,000-880 



WORTHINGTON, OHIO REP, GEO, CLARK 

JOSEPH D. BRADSHAW, Manager 



WRFD's |iiini..i\ signal dominates 72 o\ Ohio's 88 counties. WRFD i- programmed for rural and small 
town listeners who account for !'>' , of Ohio"- total retail lo..d -ale- . . . lu' , of the retail drug sales. 



WGAR- 



CBS 

5C, 000-1220 



CLEVELAND. OHIO, REP, CHRISTAL 

CARE E. GEORGE. Gen. Wgr. 



serving I ' ■_• million friend- in Northern Ohio with the best in radio. Cleveland rank- No. 1 among 
metropolitan markets in the nation for consumer spendable income with 17,492 per household (Consumer 
mark.!-. SDRS, 1954) 



16 



SPONSOR 



Just a note to say that, on all counts, 
> ours is one of the best publications 
of its type in the field. Would you 
please put my name down for the All- 
Media Evaluation Study book as soon 
as it comes out. 

Godfrey Tudor 
Horace N. Stovin & Co. 
Winnipeg 

• SPONSORS All-Media Evaluation Study «il) 
be published in book form this summer. Priee 
per eopy is $-1. You may reserve a copy now by 
writing to 40 East 4«* St.. New York 17. 



RADIO/TV DIRECTORY 

I note your offer for a free copy of 
a pocket-size Radio/Tv Directory. 

How are chances of getting three 
copies? I'd like to present the other 
two to a couple of my bosses. 
Carl E. Behr 
Business Manager 
Radio-Tv Department 
Needham, Louis & Brorby 
Chicago 



Thanks for a copy of the latest 
"Radio/Tv Directory" of New York 
and Chicago. I could use a couple of 
extra copies of the latter if you have 
them. 

Harold Essex 
WSJS, Winston-Salem 

• The New York and Chicago Radio/Tv Direc- 
tory Is available to subscribers as a SPONSOR 
service. Extra copies are furnished on request 
while available. 



WEEKEND RADIO 

Congratulations on an outstanding 
service to the radio industry through 
your publication of the series on week- 
end radio ["Weekend radio: are you 
missing a good bet?" 14 June 1954; 
page 36, Part I; 28 June 1954, page 
33, Part II]. 

Advertisers and the medium alike 
have for many years overlooked the 
possibilities of radio during this peak 
listening period. I must take excep- 
tion to your statement that stations of- 
fer announcements and programs on 
weekends at discounts up to 45%. An 
analysis of Seattle radio indicates that 
independent station rates remain con- 
stant — network stations do have dis- 
counts. 

Your article prompted KOL to ana- 
lyze its weekend audience as compared 
with the Monday-through-Friday pe- 
riod (KOL is a strong independent 



during this period in Seattle). Look at 
the results: 

0UT-0P-H0MI Pi 

irdaj Sunday 

12 noon 50% inert ;i •■ ', in 

12 i r, i, pm 6 i 3< ; increase L07 1 

6 pm-midnighl L5.79S decrea i • 

[N-HOMB [PULSE) 

6 am 12 noon 2595 increase L50 1 in* 
12 noon-6 pm 50% increase ir,,-n>ase 

midnight ill'.; increase ill-, increase 

IN-HOME I H00P1 R 

S iturday Sunday 

6 am-6 pm 124% increase 220% inci 

Thanks to your article, the KOL 
sales staff is now telling the story of 
the value of weekend advertising to 
clients. To help us do so, please send 
us 75 copies of reprints of the series 
on this subject. Keep up the good 
work ! 

Bill Simpson 
KOL, Seattle 

• Reprints of the two-part "Weekend radio" 
series cost 25c apiece. Quantity prices on request. 



AIR IN FRANCE 

Subscribers to sponsor since nearly 
three years, we have appreciated very 
much its dynamism, its efficiency and 
the thorough fashion in which all ques- 
tions are presented and examined. 

'"Programmes de France" of which 
I am the manager is the most impor- 
tant European enterprise concerned 
with the recording of sponsored radio 
programs. 

Sponsored television, although it is 
just starting in Europe (Tele Luxem- 
bourg will broadcast its first television 
programs next November) is now 
claiming all our attention. 

In this early stage, and wishing to 
avoid as many pitfalls as we can, we 
must try and profit from the experi- 
ence that your country must have ac- 
cumulated in nearly 10 years of tv ex- 
perience. 

That is win we have decided to take 
a trip to the United States. 

Could it be possible for you to send 
me a list of the most important agen- 
cies and stations concerned with the 
elaboration, recording and/or direct 
broadcasting of tv programs and pub- 
lic shows. 

Jean D'Agostino 

Manager 

Les Programmes de France 

Paris 



• SPONSOR'S Radio Tv Directory lists major 
agencies and stations in New ^ ork and Chicago. 
It is available free to subscriber*. 



Maryland's Most Honored 
Television Station 




NOW! 

maximum 
power 




ADDED 

To The Finest Studio 

and Production Facilities 

in Baltimore 

Have You Seen 
the WAAM Story 



? 



represented nationally by 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER 
& PARSONS, INC. 



1 1 . 1 . ■ -1 1 


Ml 


CHANNEL 


w 


TELEVISION 


HILL 


BALTIMORE, 


MD. 



26 JULY 1954 



17 



SURE TO BE THE HOTTEST SHOW 



SINCE DRAGNET 



NOW ON TELEVISION 

...39 brand new half-hour films 

Thrilling adventure. Mike Waring, The 
Falcon, is an undercover intelligence 
agent for the government. His assign- 
ments take him all over the world — on 
both sides of the Iron Curtain. Wherever 
he goes, The Falcon meets mystery and 
adventure. 

Outstanding production. Exciting for- 
eign backgrounds add to the superb real- 
ism. Inspired production by Hollywood's 
Harry Joe Brown keeps the action 
trigger-fast! 

A great new star. Charles McGraw, as 
Mike Waring, is the most dynamic person- 
ality on TV since Jack Webb. His pictures 
include "The Killers," "War Paint," and 
the soon to be released "The Bridges At 
Toko-Ri." 



Ready-made audience. The Falcon has 
proved popular during nine great years 
on radio for such sponsors as Procter & 
Gamble, General Mills, and Kraft. 

Low cost per thousand. Nielsen says, 
"Mysteries deliver the lowest cost-per- 
thousand in night-time television."* And 
the best new mystery-adventure show on 
the market is THE FALCON. 
THE FALCON carries with it NBC FILM 
DIVISION'S exclusive merchandising 
package: 

• to help bring in every possible 
viewer 

• to help bring in every possible 
customer 

For high-flying sales in your market, 
ride with THE FALCON. Call, write or 
wire today. 

'Based on Sept. -Oct. 193.1 Nielsen Television Index. 
Evening shows half-hour or longer. 



NBC FILM DIVISION 

SERVING ALL SPONSORS ... SERVING ALL STATIONS 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. • Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. • Sunset & Vine Sts., Hollywood, Calif. 
In Canada: RCA Victor, 225 Mutual Street, Toronto • 1551 Bishop Street, Montreal 




No matter how you look 
at KTVlTs market*" 

IT'S IMPORTANT! 



\titj one of the following three areas is 
on important TV market by itself! 
COMBINED - - population -wise - - 

they total California's third largest 
market! 



lUHHinuiiii: . iiminiiimiiiiiu m iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiHiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiu i 

SAN JOAQUIN C0VNT1 1. Undu plicated coverage of San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties 

Stockton San Joaquin County J^'7,000 Population 

92nd market out of top 100 
NBC research 

Add Stanislaus County 111. 000 Population 

Combined Counties 1,000 Total Population 

Combined San Joaquin 
and Stanislaus counties 

would equal a market d (estimate — out of top 100 

Sales Managemenl 

Add 
SACRAMENTO COl MY 2. Sacramento county 336,000 Population 

Sacramento 72ml market out of top 100 

(Sales Management 

.I'M Alameda — Contra Costa 3. Continuous counties — partial and full county coverage — 
Sutter — El Dorado — 13 counties — pro-rated 

Placer Merced sdano — imputation total over 400,000 Population 

Tuolumne- Glenn — Yolo 
( ialaveras * lolusa - Amador 

■ r ■>■■ rr:ni!:i"-7l ciiiiii iiitmiiiiii iii]liiillillillHiiillllIHllll!lin lllllinilllillMlllllllllllll IllllllllllllllllllllllllHD [III nHIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllIllll«lllllinillllllllIIII!lllllllillinillllliiiniiili!i!iiiiniiiiii'i:;i,niliiiiii • mm • i 

Grand total within l\ I VU S effective signal area!!!! 

over 1,000,000 population!!!! 

over 100,000 UHF homes to date!!!! 



KTVU 



36 NBC-TV 



One-Half Million 
Watts From Half- 
Mile in the SVy! I M Represented by George P. Hollingbery Company 



20 SPONSOR 



' 



New and renew 



SMISII 



26 JULY 1954 



1. 



\ew on Radio 

SPONSOR 



Networks 

AGENCY 



Amoco, Bait 

Cat's Paw Rubber Co. Bait 

Chevrolet Div, Cen'l Mo- 
tors, Detroit 

Chevrolet Div, Cen'l Mo- 
tors, Detroit 

Chevrolet Div. Cen'l Mo- 
tors, Detroit 

Dole Sales Co, SF 

Florida Citrus Comm, 
Lakeland 

Lemon Prod Advisory Bd, 
Cal 

A. E. Staley Mfg. Decatur, 
III 

Texas Co, NY 



Wm. Wrigley |r Co, Chi 
Wm. Wrigley Jr Co, Chi 



Jos Katz. Bait 

S. A. Lcvyne Co, Bait 

Campbell-Ewald, Detroit 

Campbell-Ewald, Detroit 

Campbell-Ewald, Detroit 

N. W. Ayer, SF 
JWT, NY 

McCann-Erickson, LA 

Y&R, NY 

Erwin.Wasey, Inc, NY 

Direct 
Direct 



STATIONS 



CBS 83 

ABC 353 

CBS 206 

CBS 206 

CBS 206 

CBS 180 
MBS 560 

MBS 495 

CBS 206 

ABC 348 

CBS 193 
CBS 193 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Rhythm on the Road; Sun 4:30-5 pm; 4 July; 13 

wks 
Modern Romances; M 11-11:15 am; 26 |une; 8 

wks 
Allen Jackson & the News; Sat 1:30-1:35 pm, 3- 

3:05 pm; 4:55-5 pm; 3 July; 13 wks 
Robert Trout & News; Sun 9:55-10 am. 1-1:05 

pm, 2:30-35 pm, 5:55-6 pm; 4 July; 13 wks 
Robert Trout & News; M-F 9:55-10 am; 5 July; 

13 wks 
House Party; F 3:30-45 pm; 30 July; 13 wks 
Florida Calling with Tom Moore; F 11-11:25 am; 

5 July; 52 wks 

Multi-Message Plan; M-F 8-8:30 pm; 28 June; 

no. wks not available 
Arthur Codfrey Time; M-F (alt days) 10-10:15 

am; 19 July; 52 wks 
Texaco Star Reporter & the Week-end News; Sat 

6 Sun 5 min on hr from 9 am to 11 pm; 3 
July; 13 wks 

FDI in Peace & War; W 8-8:25 pm; 30 June; 6 

wks 
Cangbusters; M 9:30-55 pm; 5 July; 6 wks 




2. 



3. 



Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



American Tobacco Co, 

Lucky Strike, NY 
CIO, Wash 

Procter Cr Gamble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter & Camble, Cinci 

Procter 0- Camble, Cinci 

Radio Bible Class, Grand 
Rapids 

R. J. Reynolds (Prince Al- 
bert & Cavalier) 
Winston-Salem 



BBCO, NY 

Henry J. Kaufman 
Y&R, NY 
Compton, NY 
D-F-S, NY 
Benton & Bowles, 
Compton, NY 
Benton & Bowles 
Compton, NY 



Wash 



NY 



NY 



John M. Camp, Wheaton, 

III 
William Esty. NY 



STATIONS 



CBS 

ABC 168 

CBS 173 

CBS 132 

CBS 168 

CBS 165 

CBS 143 

CBS 104 

CBS 160 

ABC 235 

NBC 93 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Jack Benny; Sun 7-7:30 pm; 26 Sept; 39 wks 

John Vandercook; M-F 7-7:15; 6 Sept; 52 wks 
Brighter Day; M-F 2:45-3 pm; 28 June 52 wks 
Cuiding Light; M-F 1:45-2 pm; 28 June: 52 wks 
Ma Perkins; M-F 1:15-30 pm; 28 June; 52 wks 
Perry Mason; M-F 2:15-30 pm; 28 June 52 wks 
Road of Life; M-F 1-1:15 pm; 28 June; 52 wks 
Rosemary; M-F 11:45-12 noon; 28 June; 52 wks 
Young Dr. Malone; M-F 1:30-45 pm; 28 June; 52 

wks 
Radio Bible Class; Sun 8-8:30 am; 4 July; 52 wks 

Crand Olc Opry; Sat 9:30-10 pm; 3 July; 52 wks 



(See page 2 for New National Spot Radio and Tv Business) 



National Broadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 




John P. Barry 


Ceorge W. Clark, NY, acct exec 




James E. Blake Jr 


KSTP, Minneapolis, sis stf 




Jim Brown 


KMYR, Denver, prom dir 




William A. Creed Jr 


Bertha Bannan. Boston, slsmn 




Roy M. Danish 


MBS. NY, dir comml opers 




Edwin L. Dennis 


WHB & WHB-TV, KC, sis dept 




Eugene B. Dodson 


WKY & WKY-TV, Okl3 City, admin 


asst 


Jay Eliasberg 


Foote, Cone & Belding, NY, dir adv 


res 


Dudley W. Faust 


CBS, NY. Eastern sis mgr 




Frederick W. Florenz 


Cupples Co, St Louis, sis stf 




Wilson K. Foster 


KLX, Oakland, Cal. sportscstr 




Richard H. Cehring 






Richard Cerkin 


John Blair, NY, sis exec 





NEW AFFILIATION 



KYA, SF, Eastern sis rep (hq WINS, NY) 

Same, natl sis mgr r-tv 

KBTV, Denver, natl sis mgr 

Walker Rep Co, Boston, New Engl sis mgr 

Same, asst to pres 

KMBC-TV, KC, loc tv sis mgr 

Same, dir of radio opers 

ABC Radio, NY, dir net radio res 

Same, net sis mgr 

WBAL, Bait, sis stf 

Same, mgr 

WTVN. Columbus, O, sis rep 

WNEW, NY, acct exec 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network) ; Advertising Agency Personnel 
Changes; Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 




\ umbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 

John T. Madigw 
Fran I; Young (3) 

IT. H. Johnston (3) 
Edwin L. Dennis < 3 ' 
E. B. Dodson <3) 



26 JULY 1954 



21 



26 JULY 1954 



\rn ami rt-itfu 






3, 



National Broadcast Sales Executives (eontinuett) 




NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Ccorgc Cr.iy 


WKNA-TV, Charleston, gen sis mgr 


WLW-D. Dayton, natl sis rep 


Richard C. Codon 


West Pacific Adv, Spokane, acct exec 


KCA, Spokane, stn mgr 


Francis Hays 


WCST, Atlanta, acct exec 


WLW-A, Atlanta, acct exec 


Thomas ). Henry 


MBS. Chi. co-op prog sis dept 


Same, acct exec 


Ccorgc |. Higgins 


KMBC KFRM KMBC-TV, sis mgr 


Same, vp 


Ben Holmes 


KOMA. Okla City, asst mgr 


Tulsa Broadcasting Co, Tulsa, natl sis mgr 


W. V Hurt 


KLRA, Little Rock, gen mgr 


KTHS, Little Rock, comml mgr 


Robert Hyland 


KMOX. St Louis, genl sis mgr 


Same, asst gen mgr and gen sis mgr 


Herb Jaffe 


Official Films. NY, sis dir 


Same, vp & mem bd of dir 


Winton H. Johnston 


WHB & WHB-TV, KC. sis dept 


KMBC-TV. KC. tv sis rep 


Austin E joscclyn 


KOVR. Stockton. Cal, asstg in orep new stn for 
oper I start Sepi 


Same, exc-c vp & gen mgr 


Clcnn Kykcr 


K&E. Detroit, sis dept 


V/WJ, WWJ-TV. Detroit, sis prom mgr 


Albert Larson 


Paul H Raymcr Co, NY, sis stf 


Avcry-Knodel. NY, tv sis stf 


Jack Lucas 


WCCO, Minn, hd of acctg dept 


Same, acct exec on sis stf 


John T. Madigan 


ABC -TV. NY, mgr spec events 


WMTW. Mt. Wash, NH, prog dir 


Dick Maguire 


KFJI. Klamath Falls. Ore. gen mgr 


KUAM. Agana, Cuam, resident mgr 


S. W. McCready 


Eugene Tv, Eugene, Ore, gen mgr 


Same, vp 


Clyde H. McDonald 


Y&R, Toronto, acct exec 


BBM, Toronto, res dir 


Sherman ). McQueen 


Don Lee Bdcstg, Hollywood, comml prog supvr 


CBS Radio. Hollywood, asst dir bus affairs 


Robert Z. Morrison jr 


NBC, NY, acct exec spot sis 


WKBH. WKBTitv). La Crosse, Wis, sis mgr 


Wayne Mullcr 


KBIC, Hywd, acct exec 


Same, natl sis mgr 


John R. Overall 


MBS, NY, Eastern sis mgr 


CBS Radio Net, NY. Eastern sis mgr 


Anne Nelson 


CBS Radio. Hollywood, assoc dir bus affairs 


Same, dir of bus affairs 


Richard Pack 


WNBT & WNBC. NY. dir progs & opers 


Weslinghouse Bdcstg Co. natl prog mgr 


Kenneth E. Patmore 


Curtis Publishing. Cleveland, space slsmn 


WCAR. Cleveland, adv sis rep 


William S. Pirie Jr 


WFBR. Bait, sis dir 


WCBM. Bait, dir sis 


Jack Raycl 


NBC TV. NY, prodr "Home" show 


Same, gen prog exec 


Ralph Sacks 


KSAN-TV, SF. comml mgr 


KSFO, SF. sis dept 


Dean Schaffncr 


ABC Ridio. NY, dir net radio res 


Same, dir radio net sis devel & mkt res couny 


Robert Schlinkert 


WKRC-TV, Cinci. sis mgr 


Same, gen sis mgr 


Carl R. Schutz 


WATV. Newark, acct exec 


WNBC Radio Sales. NY. acct exec 


William D. Swanson 


Tulsa Bdcstg Co, Tulsa, gen sis mgr 


Same, local & reg sis mgr 


Milton M. Schwartz 


Esquire. NY. prom-pub writer 


WNBC-WN3T. NY, adv, prom & mdsg dept 


Stan Vainrib 


Storer Bdcstg, Birm, Ala 


Academy Film Prods, Chi. vp prodn, gen sis 


James P. Walker 


KATV, Pine Bluff. Ark, gen mgr 


Tulsa Bdcstg Co. Tulsa, asst gen mgr 


Stu Wilson 


KBIC, Hywd, prod & pub serv mgr 


KBIF, Fresno, stn mgr 


Frank Young 


Natl Fdtn for Inf Paral. NY, r-tv pub 


Screen Cems. NY, press mgr 



Neve Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR 



Centaur-Caldwell Div, Sterling Drug. NY 
Fibre Milk Container Dept, American Can 

Co. NY 
Local Chevrolet Dealers Assn. NY 
KWK, KWK-TV. St Louis. Mo 

MCA TV, Ltd, NY 
Polaroid Corp. Cambridge, Mass 
Riggio Tob Corp, Brightswatcr, NY 
Adam Scheidt Brewing Co. Norristown. Pa 
Tn State Flavor Co. Div Quaker State 
Coco-Cola Bottling Co, Pittsburgh 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Fizrin 

Milk containers 

Automobiles 

Radio station and new sister vhf tv station 

Film syndicators 

Polaroid Land Camera & accessories 

Regent cigarettes 

Valley Forge Beer, Prior Beer. Rams Head Ale 

Bottoms Up "canned soft drink) 



Compton. NY 
Compton. NY 

Compton NY 

Rutledgc & Lilicnfeld. St Lou 

Mo 
Paris & Peart. NY 
Doyle Dane Bernbach. NY 
L. H. Hartman Co. NY 
Al Paul Lcfton Co. Phila 
Wasser. Kay & Phillips Pitts- 
burgh 




\ umbers after namt s 
refei to ^ en and Re- 
ategoi i 

D 
Holmes 
II 1 1 Swansoi (3) 
R II I 
II Uson K. I osti 

Jim Brown 

< . II. McDonaU 

II . I . Hutt 

: Hyland 




22 



SPONSOR 



$ 21,000 Chris-Craft Sport Fisherman 



// 




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By using Mt. Washington TV — the TV 
station with the greatest coverage in 
America — you can save the cost of a 
$21,000 Chris-Craft "Sport Fisherman" 
in 28 weeks of a 15 minute show aired 
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LARGEST ON THE WAVES 

Mt. Washington's more-than-a- 
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of the three states of Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont. On the 
air in August. 




WHAT NETWORK! 

This "3-state one-9tation TV net- 
work" covers virtually all the 
families local TV stations do. 
Reaches thousands of families 
they cannot reach. Yet average 
time costs run 54% less than the 
combined cost of the three TV 
stations giving next best coverage. 




CBS-ABC 



Represented nationally by 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS, Inc. 



26 JULY 1954 



Channel 8 



23 




Larsen's the name and WEMP is 
the station. Milwaukeeans know 
THAT combination means the 
best in radio. 

And so do dozens of shrewd na- 
tional advertisers who recognize 
Coffeehead's leadership among 
Milwaukee radio personalities. 

Join them and find out how 
WEMP delivers up to twice the 
Milwaukee audience per dollar 
of Milwaukee network stations. 

CALL HEADLEY-REED! 



•a.,.. . i .,„ i,,,. 

m.l *Kli* rmtm 



availabU /'i,Z. 



WEMP WEMP 

MILWAUKEE 

HUGH IOICE. ML, 9m. Mqr. 
HEADLEY-REED. Natl. Rap. 



HOURS OF MUSIC. NEWS. SPORTS 





Albert Plant 

Advertising, Promotion, Merchandising Manager 
Dorothy Gray, New York 



\\ lien Albert Plaut, Dorothy Gray's advertising manager, looked 
over the results of the Stewart DougaU consumer -ur\e\ that his 
firm had made, he found that he had the ver\ best cosmetics market 
right in his own home: his 12-year-old daughter. 

It seems that the mean average age for using makeup and nail 
polish in the U.S. is 12 years and two months. Dorothy Gray, how- 
ever, had been particularly strong among the 30 year-and-older age 
group. Plaut thought the situation over and decided that tv was the 
natural medium for making the Dorothy Gray line popular among 
the 25 year-and-under group. 

Here's how he approached this medium, new in Dorotln Gray ad- 
vertising bistorj : 

The initial tv test ran in Houston and Los Angeles between 1 May 
and end of July 1953 (through Lennen & Newell). It consisted of 
minute announcements, scheduled during the day and evening. Sales 
results coupled with reaction of retailers in those markets proved 
the pull of the medium. 

Dorothy Gray's second tv test was a more comprehensive one 
running from 1 March through 20 June 1054. It included minute 
announcements in these 10 cities: New ^ <>rk. Boston. Atlanta. De- 
troit. Chicago, Washington, Cleveland, Dallas. San Francisco, Los 
Angeles. The firm used an average of eight minute announcements 
a week to advertise three products out of Dorotln Gray's line of 
cosmetics ranging from a $1.00 lipstick to a $3.50 hormone < ream. 

"We felt that this te-t was conclusive," Plaut told sponsor. "The 
result- were satisfying not so much in terms of sales, but rather in 
demand for the brand by retailer accounts we had previously not 
carried." 

In 1954 rough!) <>V; of the total national budget will go into tv. 
Dorothy Gra\ has -iizned a 52-week contract with ABC TV for co- 
sponsorship of The Ray Bolger Show with Lysol over a (>7-< itv hook- 
up. The program, a half-hour musical situation comedy, will cost 
about $32,000 a week to produce. It- major purpose will be to popu- 
larize the Dorotln Graj line among young women under 25. 

Besides i ontributing our actual and one potential « ustomer to the 
Dorothj Graj line in hi- own family, Plant guarantees that both 
In- 12-year-old and his nine-year-old daughters are Raj Bolger fans. 

• * • 



24 



SPONSOR 





We're proud of the results 33 years experience 
enables us to give to you, our sponsors — and 
we're proud of the 92% consistent listenership 
within WSPD's 16 county, billion dollar market. 

Let us show you what outstanding results you 
can get by taking advantage of WSPD's experience 
and WSPD's loyal listenership. Call your nearest 
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^AM-TV 

TOLEDO, OHIO 



Storer Broadcasting Company 
TOM MARKER. NAT SALES DIR . 118 E. 57th STREET. NEW YORK 



Represented Nationally 
by KATZ 



26 JULY 1954 



25 



, *•"", 



• UV&* 



Newest Southeast 
Kansas — Northeast 
Oklahoma survey 
covering 1 1 
county Coffeyville 
trade area ' 256.000 
people 1 reports: 

KCCF HAS BIG- 
GEST AUDIENCE 
IN 45 OUT OF 52 
MONDAY THRU 
FRIDAY ' 4 HOUR 
STRIPS! i6:00 
A.M. to 6:30 P.M.) 

KGGF with 10 
KW on 690 KC 
delivers primary 
coverage to a total 
of 87 counties in 
Kansas, Oklahoma, 
Missouri and 
Arkansas. 



690 KC ABC 

COFFEYVUU, KMMS 



[WEED & CO., National Representatives 



\<»ir developments on SPONSOR stories 




SOOJ '"llurk»t«T» : whal >ou can do about 

them* 1 

Issue: 31 >!•>> 1954, page 27 

SllbjOC't: IA*< 4dvuorj Council take* new 
ttepi to reduce objectionable ads 



\n\ member of 4A's •juilt\ of objectionable advertising now 
fare- the possibility of loss of membership in the organization. 

Before an) agenc] charged with objectionable advertising is ex- 
pelled, however, the 4A's Advisor) Council will meet with agency 
representatives to discuss the infringement The Council will then 
report on the outcome of this meeting to the 1 V's Board of Directors. 

Following receipt of the report the Board may, if it so decides, 
proceed to annul membership of the offending agency. 

The \d\isorx Council i- composed of all former chairmen of the 
board and presidents of the association who are connected with 
member agencies and the current chairman. \<K isory Council (hair- 
man is Earle Ludgin, president of Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago. 

Advisory Council action in expelling members would be under- 
taken onlj in cases where agencies were elearlx felt to he at fault 
in suggesting or encouraging objectionable advertising. Says Earle 
Ludgin. "In cases where the agenc) i- trying to restrain a client and 
is not itself aiding or abetting objectionable advertising. \ \ \ \ 
would clearly want to assist the member concerned." 

The 4A's also deals with objectionable advertising through the 
monthlx Interchange of Opinion on Objectionable Advertising. Par- 
ticipating member and non-member agencies report examples of ob- 
jectionable advertising to the Interchange. Complaints received are 
passed along by the 4A's to the agency which had originated the 
advertising, without identifying the source of the complaint. No 
pressure is brought to bear, and the agency can take whatever ac- 
tion it sees fit. * * * 



SoOt "International Radio. Tv Section" 

Issuo: 28 June 1934. page 41 




Subject: 



First commercial tv Station open? 
in French Morocco 



The first commercial television station in Africa was opened re- 
cenllx in Casablanca, chief seaport of French Morocco. 

The station is the first of a planned television network linking all 
major cities of the protectorate and covering an estimated popula- 
tion of eight million. A second station is planned in Rabat. 

The Casablanca station began experimental telecasting 22 Feb- 
ruary, telex ised some 20 hours of xveeklv programing through April. 
It has just tipped its weeklx total to 30 hours, plans to program 40 
"i 50 hours a week after October. 

Lmong the problems faced by this pioneer tx station in Africa is 
one of programing. The French Morocco population i« divided into 
three groups with different economic and cultural backgrounds and 
different native tongues: the Arabic population, the French settlers 
and colonial officers and a large number ol Americans. The station 
originall) planned to divide its programing hours among \rahic 
French and English shows. It now hope- to develop a technical so- 
lution to the language programing problem wherein two sound sig- 
nals are radiated simultaneously with the vision signal: one in 
Arabic and one in French. 

Owner of the station, the Compagnie Marocaine de Radio-Televi- 
sion, predicts there will be at least 50,000 i\ sets in the area within 
the next lour or fixe years. This figure represents one-quarter the 
present number of radio sets there. 



• • * 



KNX NEWS IS 
GOOD NEWS IN 
LOS ANGELES! 



Twelve of the thirteen top-rated daytime 

Los Angeles radio programs (according to Pulse) 

are KNX programs! 

Six of the twelve are KNX news programs! 

Five of the six are KNX locally produced 
news programs! 

And these five quarter-hour local KNX news 
strips command an average rating of 5.6 . . . 
deliver an average of 238,670 in-and-out-of-home 
listeners per quarter-hour every day! 

For details about top-rated news programs on 
the most listened-to station in Southern 
California, call KNX or CBS Radio Spot Sales. 



CBS OWNED • LOS ANGELES • 50,000 WATTS 



KNX 



Sources on request 
26 JULY 1954 27 



C'mon 

and 

Hear 



The New Amos 'n'Andy Music Hall 
five nights a week direct from 



the Mystic Knights of the Sea Lodge 






% ■» . V- 







fel : 








You'd never suspect it from their offhand 
manner, but they're the most legendary- 
salesmen in the land. One of them is Freeman 
Gosden (Amos). The other, Charles Correll 
('n' Andy). And all four of them put together have 
had Americans coming back for more, day after 
day, week after week, for 25 years. 

Beginning this fall CBS Radio will present them 
Monday through Friday evenings in one of the 
most exciting new formats in all radio: "The Amos 
'n' Andy Music Hall."* 

Through a special arrangement with The King- 
fish— Vice-President in Charge of the Whole Busi- 
ness—the show originates from the Grand Ballroom 
of the Lodge of the Mystic Knights of the Sea. 
And next to the bandstand, Amos 'n' Andy will be 
joined by the kind of guest stars that only two 
lifetimes like theirs could command. All the great 
names from radio, the stage, and from every kind 
of screen you can think of. 

What's more, Gosden 'n' Correll will personally 
tell the commercial stories of America's biggest 
advertisers— with all the irresistible candor and 
charm that makes whatever they say the last word. 

This great big nightly 'sociable' promises to 
attract a more-loyal following than any other 
program in radio: the vast number of friends who 
just wouldn't know Sunday without Amos 'n' 
Andy. And the millions of new friends they'll gain 
from CBS Radio's huge weeknight audiences. 

Will advertisers who want to make the most of 
radio's great cumulative audiences also please 
note: the costs of the Music Hall, section by 
section, reflect the sort of advertising economy 
that only radio offers today. And when it comes 
to Amos 'n' Andy— buy one, get the other one free. 

*The regular Sunday night Amos'n'Andy show will continue on the air. 

CBS Radio 
Network 



,v>" 



.%« 




c* 



** 






Gao&uufe to- Match the MasJzei 

Represented Nationally by CBS Radio and Television Spol Sales 





WBT-WBTV 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



The Radio TV Services 
of the Jeffeison Standard 
Life Insurance Compcny 



The signs of Charlotte are signs of a market 
bigger by far than city population indicates. 
Take air traffic, for example: 

In air passengers per thousand population, Charlotte 
ranks fourth in the nation, surpassed only by Miami, Dallas 
and Atlanta — surpassing such air travel centers as 
Washington, Kansas City and San Francisco-Oakland. 

Charlotte's bulging, pre-war air terminal gives way 
to a plush, new $1,500,000 terminal building due for 
dedication this spring. 

Such busy-ness cannot be accounted for alone by the fact 
that there is no rival commercial airport for 60 miles 
in any direction but only by the additional fact that 
this 60-mile area is densely populated with prosperous 
people who depend upon Charlotte for air travel 
and myriad other services, including — 

— Radio and television. Charlotte's great area stations, 
WBT and WBTV unite hundreds of populous textile 
communities into one integrated market ranking 
in the first 25 markets of the nation. 



J 



26 JULY 1954 



^> 





HOW FEAR PUNISHES RADIO AND TELEVISION 



The finger painting shown here was drawn by a frightened person 
undergoing psychological therapy. Psychologists had the patient 
make the finger painting to help them analyze his inner fears. This 
"projective'' psychological technique and other psychological tests, 
coupled with depth interviewing, haw now been appHed to admen. 
Result? It has been discovered they are often motivated by fear. 
According to psychologists Like Dr. Ernesl Dichter, Eeai penalizes 
radio and television in two ways: 

1. It pi rpi lnah -x tin media stains quo. Air tm 'Ha are newer, harder 
to use, intangible. Adman's fear makes him waul to deal with the 
old, the easy aiid the tangible like newspapers and maga 

2. It perpetuates 'he program status quo. Because of high cost of 
failure, adman often spends his time trying to copy format of sue- 
cessful slum -in commercial — instead of uncovering basic appeals. 



"Fear," says Dr. Dichter, "results in imitative use of media." 




Ire W afraid ? 



Studies show fear plays major role in media 
selection. Here's what top agency heads think 

by Ray Lapica 



J. he psychologists say: 

• If you're not driven by fear — at 
least part of the time — you won't 
read this. 

• If you are, you'll not only read 
it, but you'll disagree — vehementlj . 

For the secure adman, whether agen- 
cy or client, accepts the fact that fear 
plays a vital role in all functions of 
life, including advertising, whereas the 



insecure ones show the typical signs of 
"escape." And these are to argue as 
follows : 

1. "Your findings apply to others, 
but not to me." 

2. "Your analysis is incorrect." 

3. "Yes, but—." 

At least that is what psychologists 
like Dr. Ernest Dichter say. 

Working separately, at different 



times and in different places, both Dr. 
Dichter and sponsor uncovered some 
startling psychological facts about how 
admen select the media they do. 

Dr. Dichter heads his own Institute 
for Research in Mass Motivations, Cro- 
ton, N. Y. SPONSOR'S findings were 
uncovered during the course of its two- 
year All-Media Evaluation Study. (The 
last of the 26 articles was published 
28 June 1954; all 26 are now being 
reprinted in book form. You may re- 
serve a copy by writing direct to SPON- 
SOR. The price is $4.) 

The basic finding was this: Lnable 
to measure advertising's results, the 
average advertising man — afraid of 
failure and worried about job security 



controversy 



26 JULY 1954 



31 






mm 



y 



/ 




Dr. Ernest Dichtcr 

Presidi e Insl itute for Ee- 

Bearch in Mass Motivations, I'r. Dich- 
ter is known ;is ;i pioneei in use of 
depth interview a new approach to 
mi r.M .1 n-li. Ho holds a 
il reputation as the solver 
of intricate problems for industry, 
advertising and civic groups. 



— frequently resort? to "crutches" or 
stratagems t<> do his thinking for him. 
\iiil these, according to Dr. Dichter, 
are: 

Reliance on cost-per-1,000, the 
drive toward mass coverage, making 
campaigns fit the budget, selling "pres- 
tige" instead of products for the cli- 
ii 1 1 and for oneself, depending on some 
Mutational aspect of the product to sell 
it, a firm belief in the effectiveness of 
■ju-t keep drumming' 1 and practicing 
expediency or following the leader. 

SPONSOR, nil the other hand, discov- 
ered ill, it five conscious or subcon- 
scious factors often influence admen 
in choosing media. None has anything 
t.i do with selling the product. These 
are: the adman's background, bis job 
-<-uiit\ "i insecurity, bis personal 
bias, In- desire t<> impress and his and 

tile de-ire to gel new hu-i- 

ne--. 

Both studies Dr. Dichter's and 
sponsor's involved interviews with 
Mime 2iiii persons each. Dr. Dichter's 
were depth inten iews. 

When the findings of both studies 



DO YOU BUY MEDIA FROM FEAR? 

SPONSOR found in its 2-ycar All-Media Evaluation Study that five 
conscious or subconscious factors often influence admen in 
choosing media. None has anything to do with selling product: 

1. Adman's background. Ee tends to stick with what lie knows best. 

2. Jul, security. Insecure adman takes no chances, follows leader. 

!i. Personal bias. Adman who hates commercials may boycott air media. 

I. Drxm to iwi/i/V'N.v. Adman may plan big splash just to get attention. 

.». Desin /<< ;/< t neu business. A.gency may do same to win aen clients. 

Dr. Ernest Dichter found ogencymen are often driven by fear and 
insecurity because they can't measure exact results of advertising. As 
result they fall back on these substitutes for creative thinking: 

1. Drivi toward mass coverage. "If you shout loud enough, 
Bomeone is bound to hear." 

2. " Unitcirculation-cost" concept (cost-per-M). Buy the cheapest. 
Make your competitor outspend you. 

3. Male campaigns fit budget instead of accomplish specific objecth 

4. Sell "prestige" instead of products for client, as well as self. 
.1. Depend on some sensational aspect of product to sell it. Look 
for "seals of approval" from media giving them. 

6. "Just keep drumming." The mathematical concept of repetition. 
Depend on size and frequency to get your message across. 

7. Expediency: Stick to a successful combination. Follow the crowd. 
Please dealer and let HIM sell the goods. Don't risk a new medium. 

For complete analysis, see "III. Psychology of Media: Why admen 
buy what thi >i do," sponsor, 3 May li)."4. 




were published in "III. Psychology of 
media — why admen buy what they 
do," sponsor, 3 May 1954, they 
aroused more interest than any other 
single article of the 26-part media se- 
ries. The American Weekly asked for 




The 26 articles comprising SPONSOR'S All- 
Media Evaluation Study will appear shortly in 
book form. You may reserve your copy now by 
writing to SPONSOR, 40 East 49 St., N. Y. 17. 



32 



permission to reprint it for its em- 
ployees. A direct mail organization 
wanted copies to send to all its mem- 
bers. A radio station asked for re- 
prints to be mailed to each of its spon- 
sor prospects. 

As comments poured in, sponsor 
decided to send copies to leading agen- 
cy executives and ask them. "What do 
YOl think?" This article is their an- 
swer. Of the 24 agency executives 
polled, only five disagreed with the 
basic findings: most of the others 
agreed in whole or in part. Of those 
who disagreed, one called the article 
"dangerous." One said he had been 
counting numbers too long to start 
"nursing at the breast of Mother Dich- 
ter." One described advertising's "cur- 
rent flirtation with modern psychol- 
ogy" as a trend. And still another 
pointed to the growth of all media as 
refutation of the finding that radio and 
u were being penalized. 

In this article you'll find not onlj 
their views in detail but also Dr. Dich- 
ter's answer and finally the opinions of 
i Please turn to page 78 | 

SPONSOR 






DOES F-E-A-R INFLUENCE MEDIA DECISIONS? 

Some agency executives disputed psychological findings indicating irrational factors like tear 
affect media decisions, but most agreed. Here are some sample quotes from SPONSOR survey 








YES 

.1 ami's ill. Cecil, president, Cecil & 
Presbrey: "I find Dr. Dichter's views 
provocative and interesting. I think most 
old hands in advertising will agree that 
an imaginative approach to media buy- 
ing is highly productive and that ineffi- 
ciency lurks in the adoption of a con- 
ventional and traditional approach. Me- 
dia buying can be creative and should 
be creative. The more creative the ap- 
proach the more productive the adver- 
tising, whether it is media or copy." 

Fairfax ill. Cone, president, Foote, 
Cone & Beiding: "I don't think I have 
any disagreement with Ernest Dichter's 
findings. ... I am assuming that when 
Ernest says often, he means sometimes. 
And that when he says agencymen, he 
means advertising people generally. . . . 
To be sure, there is a great deal of tra- 
dition in the buying of media. There are 
also fads and fancies. But if most me- 
dia men are anything like our own, they 
are a pretty objective crew." 

Leo Burnett, president, Leo Burnett 
Co.: "I am not silly enough to argue 
Ernie Dichter's points. My own approach 
to advertising, including media, is very 
simple. It starts with an idea. If possi- 
ble, it should be an idea that will cause 
people to talk over the back fence. . . . 
(Then) one is forced to look at the bud- 
get. (Finally media) selection revolves 
around experience, common sense, facts 
. . . other things which are supposed to 
add up to good judgment." 

Marlon Harper Jr., president, 
McCann-Erickson: "There are certainly 
many fortuitous and accidental factors 
which shape advertising decisions apart 
from the rulebook, and even apart from 
unconscious motivations like fear or in- 
security. To the extent that we recognize 
the existence of these non-rational in- 
fluences on our own thinking, I think it 
becomes more nearly possible for us to 
select media objectively and wisely." 

Edward H. Weiss, president, Weiss 
& Geller: "The reluctance of some ad- 
vertisers to accept the relatively novel 
idea of using motivation research as a 
practical means of improving advertising 
will be overcome, we believe, as the 
realization spreads that most advertising 
activities . . . can be defined in terms 
of human feelings. That is why we have 
been able to successfully apply our 
knowledge of human motivations beyond 
copy to media. . . ." 






NO 

Henrtl Sehaehte. senior v.p., Bryan 
Houston: "The third article on media 
psychology is, I think, dangerous. . . . 
I am not pretending that media buying 
is perfect or unbiased. But I certainly 
will never agree that it's as dark as you 
make it. If it were as unreasoned and 
ill-planned as you indicate, how could 
advertising have become the most effec- 
tive means yet devised to move goods? 
So, please don't make media buying 
sound so haphazard — because it isn't." 

William R. Baker Jr., board 
chairman, Benton & Bowles: "Both SPON- 
SOR and Dr. Dichter overlook an im- 
portant fact in modern advertising prac- 
tice. Today's successful advertiser and 
his agent have outgrown 'decision by 
whim and caprice' — and learned to di- 
lute even subconscious domination by 
any one person. Decisions are usually 
made these days by groups, not indi- 
viduals. . . . There is little chance for 
individual bias to control their decisions." 

Harry Sehnelderman. president, 
Harry Schneiderman, Inc.: "I want to ask 
if Dr. Dichter's thesis that all will be 
well if admen begin to use the tech- 
niques of psychiatry may not replace 
one dogma with another. I do not mean 
to belittle the enormous contributions to 
human happiness made by psychiatry 
since Freud, nor do I mean to deny the 
value the use of all the social sciences 
may have for advertising. . . . (But) 
how valid are these techniques?" 

Warner S. Shelf;/, president, N. W. 
Ayer & Son: "It is quite possible . . . 
to follow a trend too far. Only recently 
the trend was to advertising research of 
a mathematical nature. . . . Your article 
about Dr. Dichter's work strips some of 
the glamor from mathematical research 
and reminds us that we are dealing with 
real people, rather than numbers. How- 
ever, advertising's current flirtation with 
modern psychology is also a trend." 

Shertvood Dodge, v.p., Foote, Cone 
& Beiding: "You can go too far on the 
psychology of media. It has to be re- 
garded as just one more yardstick, to be 
used jointly with circulation and audi- 
ence figures of all kinds, instead of re- 
placing them. As for the fear element, 
fear is a part of human nature, and I 
don't suppose it can be entirely re- 
moved from any phase of life but I 
disagree that it influences media se- 
lection to the extent you implied." 








26 JULY 19J4 



33 



Vet work radio because . . . 

1. [i gets our message across with 

i " We need this fre- 

quenej in order to liit prospects ;ii 

the crucial time of their shorl 

pi riodic interesl in our " product." 

It enables us to reach a large 
audience at a relatively low cost. 

::. li smooths the sales path Eor 

our agents by helping to make the 

company name readily known. 

I It allows local identification of 

our individual agents through 

station cut-ins on the network show. 

Since we encourage listeners to 

"See your State Farm agent,'-' such a 

tie-in is of inestimable value to us. 




Net radio helps build (he 



State Farm name : 



reading auto insurance company 
puts 30% of its budget in radio 



^\ |iio-|jc( ti\e customer has a mo- 
tivating interest in State Farm Mu- 
tual- "product" onl\ one month a 

year. Bui State Farm make- sure that 
it -tiikc- several times while the in- 
teresl is hot 

I In product: auto insurance. 

The striking medium: network ra- 
ilio. which gets nearl) one-third — or 
1300,000 of State Farm's total ad 
budget. Though the compan) puts the 
res! ol it- - mi. m $950,000 ad outlay 
into magazines, it depends on radio to 
gel it- message across with the "greal 
Frequem \ '" it needs in order to reach 
the ever-changing bal hes of "eligible" 
customers at the i ighl time. 

\uto in-iii. in. e i- generally pur- 
chased or renewed annually. The Nat. 
I ii in Mutual Automobile Insurance 
of Bloomington, III., ha- found 



34 



that a car owner's interest in insurance 
i- most apt to blossom around his own 
renewal time and the interest span, 
the compan] estimates, is about 30 
days. 

In the course of these 30 days a car 
owner ha- ample opportunity to he ex- 
posed to State Farm's message. If he 
doesn't hear it on Cecil Brown's news 
commentary program over the Mutual 
network on Sunda\ hctween 5:50 and 
6:00 p.m., he maj catch it on Jack 
Brickhouse's -ports show on the same 
web Saturday 5:45-55 p.m. 

State 1 arm sponsors both of these 
10-minute programs each week, each 

..ii about 185 \1I'>S station-. The coin- 



case history 



pain chose the programs with the aim 
of reaching a primarily male audience, 
based on its knowledge that men make 
the decision in buying automobile in- 
surance. 

\ll State Farm's media decisions are 
made with the aid of the company's 
advertising agency, Needham, Loui- 8 
Brorby of Chicago. William H. Ohlc 
a vice president of the agency, is 
count executh e. 

Ke\ executives at State Farm Mu- 
tual who ha\e most to do with the 
firm's advertising efforts arc: 

\dlai H. Rust, president of State 
Farm Mutual and chief executive of all 
three companies (auto, life. fire). 

Thomas ('. MorrilL vice president of 
State Kami Mutual and exei utive in 
charge of national advertising and 
public relation- clTorts of the firm. 

SPONSOR 



A. W. Tompkins, agenc) vice pres- 
ident of the State Farm Insurance 
Companies; he is the firm's chief sales 
executive, guiding the activities of 
State Farm's more than 7.001) agent>. 

State Farm has been enjoying a 
boom since the end of World War II. 
Safety responsibility laws passed l»\ 
mam states since the war. making it 
advisable for auto owners to be ade- 
quateh insured, have heen a factor in 
this prosperity. Sales grew from a 
premium volume in 1949 of $86,000,- 
000 to a volume in 1052 of $141,000,- 
000. 

Between 1952 and 1953. sales leaped 
ahead by $50 million, bringing the 
firms income in 1953 to a high of 
$191.000,000—a gain of 35% in vol- 
ume over the previous year. The $50 
million increase alone was almost twice 
the company's total premiums back in 
1942. 

And this year's sales, according to 
State Farm spokesman, R. D. Bischoff. 
are running ahead of 1953, reflecting 
the firm's constantly accelerating 
growth rate. In fact the company s 
main problem right now, says Bischoff. 
is to build and staff administrative of- 
fices fast enough to handle burgeon- 
ing sales. 

State Farm has 7,000 local agents 
in the U.S. and in Ontario. Canada; 
eight regional offices and 315 claim 
offices. It boasts over three million pol- 
icyholders and states that it insures 
one out of every 14 passenger cars in 
its entire operating area. This area 




State Farm aims message primarily at male audience. Firm uses two 10-minute programs each 
weekend on MBS: Cecil Brown (above) news commentary, plus sportscast by Jack Brickhouse 



covers all of the U.S. with the excep- 
tion of New York, New Jersey and the 
New England states. ( All figures here 
apply to State Farm's auto insurance 
company only, not to the Life and 
Fire divisions. The auto insurance is 
the parent company and the one on 
which consumer advertising emphasis 
is placed. I 

What part has advertising played in 
State Farms almost explosive growth? 
To put this question in its proper per- 
spective, Bischoff explains that insur- 
ance is not sold directly by advertis- 
ing; it is sold by individual agents af- 
ter a thoughtful approach and a per- 
sistent sales effort. Therefore the pri- 



mal) purpose of the advertising is to 
make the State Farm name readily 
known and to smooth the agent's path 
bj eliminating the need for him to 
identifj himself. Association with a 
well-known company is generally iden- 
tification enough. 

The firms over-all advertising ob- 
jectives are threefold: 

1. To conserve the present business. 
In the insurance business, the initial 
sale is merelv the first step. It is also 
necessary to keep the insured sold on 
the value of his protection and his 
company. This is a continuing battle. 

2. To stimulate and encourage the 

l Please turn to page 96) 



KEY EXECUTIVES CLOSE TO FIRM'S ADVERTISING EFFORTS ARE (L. TO R.) A. H. RUST, T. C. MORRILL, A. W. TOMPKINS 




26 JULY 1954 



35 




AGENCIES USING GROUP APPROACH DIVIDE MEDIA BUYERS LIKE B&B TIMEBUYERS ABOVE INTO THREE OR MORE ACCOUNT UNITS 



TIME BUYING 



Part of a series on the varied ways 

agencies organize air media Inning 



1. The pup approach at B&B 

■■ore's how If A 15 buys time: Buyers work in account groups, each headed 
h> all-media executives. Many top agencies now use this approach 

by Evelyn Konrad 



{jf »«\ God, man. \slial- wrong 
with our Media Department?" is a 
question thai was asked with increas- 
ing frequenc) l>\ top-ranking agencies 
short!) VI I . farter lifting of the 
freeze » . 

I asl Novembei the lA's I astei n \n- 
ii hi I i onferem e included a sei ies ol 
speet hes on media organization. Rep- 
resentatives "I several ol the Big 20 
agent it - al thai time dis< ussed media 
depart men) organization within their 
i,w M ag< n. ies .i- well as cui renl trends 
in n'i amping these Bl i in tures. 

111 i — general concei n w iih media or- 
izal bet a me « idespread .i iter 



36 



lifting of the freeze. \t that time it 
became apparent that the growth of 
the air media had made many views 
mi media department organization ob- 
solete. It was about two years ago 
that iii» ► — t major agencies began this 
soul-searching with a view to accom- 
plishing one main objective: bringing 
the media buyer into a position where 
he can function most efTectheh in ser- 
\ icing bis \ arious accounts. 

\ SPONSOR surve) >>l the top -'• ra- 
dio-t\ agencies shows that three main 
systems of organizing media depart- 
ments have emerged from this reval- 
uation ol agent j media-buying setups: 



the non-integrated, the semi-integrated 
and the integrated sj stems. 

1. The non-integrated or traditional 
s) stem is the t\ pe of media department 
in which the buying functions are dis- 
tinctly separated bj medium. This is 
the organization of the media depart- 
ment at .1. Waller Thompson, Foote, 
Cone & fielding and man\ other agen- 
t ies. 

2. In the semi-integrated media de- 
partment, the buyers are still separated 
In the media the) specialize in, hut 
they're assigned to account groups. 
These account groups, which ma) num- 
ber anywhere from two to five to an 

SPONSOR 



'piiiiiiiiniiHiiiiii:!! ' iiiiiiiiiiiKiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

TOP AGENCIES USING 
GROUP SYSTEM 



BBDO 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
Ted Bates 
Leo Burnett 
McCann-E rick son 
Lrnnen & Newell 
Kenyon & Eckhardt 
Compton 
Cunningham & Walsh 



agency, are supervised by one or two 
all-media men. Benton & Bowles, Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, Leo Burnett, Kenyon 
& Eckhardt, Lennen & Newell as well 
as several other major agencies have 
organized their media departments 
along these lines during the past two 
years. (See box above.) 

3. The integrated system is the fur- 
thest in evolution from the original 



one or more accounts. He acts, in ef- 
fect, as a virtually autonomous media 
director for these accounts. ^ oung & 
Rubicam is one of the few agencies 

among the top 20 major leaguers 
which is using this system. 

sponsor will analyze each of these 
systems by showing how the) operate 
in three agencies. Beginning helow, 
the first of three articles will discuss 
the functions of the media people with- 
in each system and the time or all- 
media buyer's scope and responsibili- 
ties within these systems. 

There is, of course, a certain degree 
of overlap between the three systems. 
During the past two years, however, a 
strong trend toward the semi-integrat- 
ed media department (the second sys- 
tem outlined above) has become ap- 
parent among the major agencies. 
Benton & Bowie*, as one of the leaders 
of the semi-integrated or "group ap- 
proach," furnishes a typical example 
of the way this particular method of 
organization functions. 

At Benton & Bowles Charles A. Pool- 
er is senior v.p. in charge of market- 



B&B TIMEBUYERS 

Frank Carvell 
Lee Currlin 
Donald Foote Jr. 
Arthur Hcmstead 
Bernard Kanner 
Helen Kowalsky 
Thomas Mahon 
William Murphy 
Grace Porterfield 
Jack Sinnott 
Thomas Tilson 
Richard Trea 
Sam Zitt 

ing and the Departments of Media, Re- 
search and Merchandising report to 
him. David P. Crane is v.p. in charge 
of media. Below this top level the 
media department is divided into three 
operational and one media services 
group. I Sec chart below.) 

At the head of each operational 
group there are an associate and an 
assistant media director. These men 



Purpose of UAH's svmi-integwttvd system is to pro- 
vide more individualized media planning for each account. B&B 
accounts are divided among three operational groups in media de- 
partment. They're divided not by category of accounts, but rather 
by workload. Within each operational group timebuyers and space- 
buyers are assigned one or more accounts to buy for. At the head 
of each of these three groups there's assistant media director and 
associate media director. These are all-media men. The assoc : ate 
media directors actually do creative media planning for their par- 
ticular accounts, in cooperation with account people and with the 
over-iil! media director and senior v.p in charge of marketing. Essen- 



tially, each associate media director acts as media director for an 
account group biiling approximately one-third of the agency's total 
billings. However, he has at his disposal the resources of a media 
services group provided by the agency's media department for its 
three operational media groups. Within each operational group, the 
timebuyers report to the assistant media director, who is also an all- 
media man. His and associate media director's recommendations 
are based directly upon market and specific media knowledge of 
buyers within their group. During past two years more than half of 
top 20 radio-tv agencies have reorganized media departments into 
this group system. Trend toward greater integration continues. 




Benton & Bowles 
group system 




26 JULY 1954 



37 






lonsible foi the planning ol 
the media strateg) and tin- Bupen ision 
..f the a< tu.il I'U \ ing on Beveral a< • 

c ..lllll- 

"\\ e di\ i « i« - the .i' i ounts into three 
groups bj workload," I '.i\'- < rane 
told sponsor. "It's no! the categorj 
■ . ounl noj the amount ol billing 
thai determines the group t<> which a 
parti* ill. ii .11 count i- assigned. In oth- 
ei words, our three operational groups 
.in- di\ ided Btri< il\ foi control and 
administrative purposes i" give oui 
i In-ill- more spe< ialized attention. " 
Here's how this theoi \ works oui : 
Prioi i" the i hangeovei i" the gi oup 
system, onlj one man at Union \ 
Bowles, the media dire i"i himself, 
was an all-media num. I hat is. one 
man was responsible for making me- 
dia strateg) recommendations for 30 
oi more accounts, with some $60 mil- 
lion in annual billings. In .|anuai\ 
I 1 '")-' B&B changed I" the group sys- 
tem. Now three as <>< iate media direi - 
tors and theii assistants are all-media 
men in charge ol planning and execut- 
ing media strateg) ii peration with 



I la> e i rane. 

"I a< Ii assoi iate media directoi i- 
,i. tuall) acting as media director of 
his own group the equivalent oi an 
j billing about $20 million a 
year," Crane explained. ' \t the same 
time In- has at hi- disposal the research 
and analysis facilities of a In larger 
organization. 

The assistant media directoi is also 
an all-media man. but hi- functions 
are more supervisor) than those of the 
associate media director. I nder each 
assistant media directoi in each <d the 
three operational groups there are a 
number <d timebuyers and spacebuy- 
ers who bu) lor ih<- accounts in their 
particulai group. 

A firoup a--oi iate media director 
heads the media services group, which 
further subdivides into three depart- 
ments headed h\ three department 
managers. The departments are: me- 
dia analysis and evaluation, outdoor 
.mil transportation buyers, contracts 
and estimates. 

This media services group art- as i 
pool lor the accounts in the three op- 



erational groups. No accounts are as- 
signed to the services group itself. 

"Man) of our spa< <- and tiinehu\ ers 
came originall) out of media service-.'' 
Crane told SPONSOR. "They were then 

made assistants t<> -pace or timebuyers 
and eventual!) became timebuyers or 
spacebu) ers themselves." 

Benton & Howie-' polic) i.- to train 
assistant and associate media directors 
from among the timebuyers and space- 
buyer- in the media department. To 
give them all-around media experi- 
ence, (Irani- began a system of inter- 
locking assignments some time ajio 
that i-. giving space assignments to a 
timebuyer or broadcast assignments to 
a spacebuyer. 

\\ ithin this group framework, the 
timebuyei - function is that of a spe- 
cialist in air media. Here's the work 
for which he is responsible on a epi- 
cal 13-week spot campaign: 

First, he jjets a market list from the 
client or account supervisor. This niar- 
i Please turn to page 98 I 



BAB timebuyer* make ftOO contacts* in ncifionaf 13-week coiiij*«i«ii. Here's breakdown: 



Kcp.v 
At least GO 



l.v.s'l dim' or assoe. ni«*di« dir. 

At least 3 daily nf 



HriHulviist analysis 

.1 1 It ast _■ an mini urn 



\ .p. in charge of media 



( \ieni 

■ ill campa 



iceounl group 

At h ,i 




Other buyers in agency 
At least 1 dotty 



Estimators «nd contract people 
At least 60 ftfl after campaign 



^S si, 1 1 \mi people 

I )ii I ri ./"< nil ■ >lll COmpO 



In o.niiiiio ili'imrliin'iK 



till two months 
campaign 



Traffic 

At let 



*Thf word "contact" It iitrrt rrrr to Ml .-ns with vanmi. people, either in person oe eve- the phone: it doesn't include mail or memo* 



38 



SPONSOR 





mm k 







Local food chain battles 
the giants with radio 



A 60% -radio budget has built 300% sales 
increases for Barber's in Albuquerque 



Photos l» Bill Bill 



*g ust two years ago, radio salesmen 
made little impression on the thriving 
Albuquerque, N. M., grocery chain 
known as Barbers Supermarkets. 
But today : 

• Barber's spends six out of every 
10 advertising dollars on either radio 
announcements or radio programs on 
four Albuquerque stations. The bal- 
ance of an ad budget just under $100,- 
000 is spent in newspapers and other 
local media by the seven-store chain. 

• According to B. Alan Brower, the 
chain's advertising director, since using 
radio, "No month has passed without 
showing a substantial increase over the 
preceding month's volume, and no 
month has failed to show an increase 
over the corresponding month of the 
previous vear." 



Barber's executives map air strategy. L. to r.: 
John R. Williams, general manager; Alfred L. 
McLane, assistant; B. Alan Brower, ad mgr. 




• Barber's now competes strongh 
with such national and regional groc- 
ery giants as Safeway, Piggly Wiggly, 
Big Bear and Furr's. "If the present 
rate of growth continues," Barber's 
officials state, "gross sales will exceed 
the $10 million mark in 1955." This 
w ill make Barber's a "Class A" chain — 
no mean feat for a local firm. 

What caused Barber's to break with 
the let's-not-bother-with-radio philoso- 
phy held by many of the country's 
grocery firms? What radio formula 
has produced such an eye-opening pic- 
ture in the face of competition from 
local newspapers and three Albuquer- 
que television stations? 

Barber's first big test of radio came 
about in September of 1952 as the re- 
sult of a local crisis: the clerks and 



case history 



butchers in Albuquerque's grocery 
stores went out on strike. To keep sales 
rolling while a settlement was made. 
Barber's bought a weekend saturation 
announcement package on KOAT. lo- 
cal ABC Radio affiliate. Somewhat to 
Barber's surprise, although the chain 
had used radio briefly once before, it 
did the trick. Sales levels held up, 
strike or no strike. 

At this point, adman Al Brower en- 
tered the scene, having been hired by 
Barber's to supervise advertising and 
promotion. Brower soon made a bold 
move. "If radio works." he suggested, 
"let's use a lot more of it." Barbers 
executives gave Brower the green light. 



giiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ii!nii[ii!!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii>| 

W eeUenu" saturation splash 
supplements regular shouts 

J. Week-long "softening" 
of audience is done by two 
daily shows on KABQ, KOAT. 

2. Oh weekends, 130 radio 
announct nn nts in 2 1 ■_■ days 
ar< used on four outlets, 
tie in with print ads. 

| 3. Of total budget, about 
60', goes to radio. Balance 
tints to print . promotions. 

4. Extensive use is made 
of both co-op funds and 

| co-op radio aids. About 25% 

I of ad spending is co-op. 

Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiinnii^ 

The weekend saturation announce- 
ment schedules were expanded in June 
1953 to include Albuquerque's other 
three network affiliates: KABQ (MBS), 
KGGM (CBS) and KOB (NBC). 
Store managers began to report that 
the radio drives were having a notice- 
able effect in boosting weekend sales — 
an important shopping period in a city 
which has a large Air Force and gov- 
ernment population, in addition to 
tourists and ranchers from the sur- 
rounding counties. 

But still Brower wasn't completely 
happy. Some form of pre-selling, he 
felt, was needed to "soften up" the 
city's housewives and homemakers be- 
fore he fired off his weekend spot 
bombardment. In August 1953 Bar- 
ber's moved into radio programing 
i Please I urn to page 101) 



26 JULY 1954 



39 



10 ways to put more sell in yoi 



by Irving Settel 

g i requentl) television advertisers are more concerned 
wiili improving program ratings than with improving the 
"ratings" "I theii sales messages. I lii- i- unfortunate. 
Ever) businessman knows thai the value of the dollars 
spent on television is onl) .1- good .1- the resulting ring 
oJ 1 ash r< - ist< 1 - in retail stores. 

I rom .1 practical (mint of view, program ratings are 
important. Program content and resulting audience listen- 
ership determine the number "I potential persons sub- 
ted t" tin' sales message. However, what happens .it 
the poinl ol "now here's .1 message from oui sponsor?" 
This question i- dramaticall) answered b) results of a 
recent stud) which indicated that, In television areas, con- 
suraption oi wain increases substantial!) during "com- 
mercial time periods." In oilier words, we arc losing 
highlj rated program audiences /"/ poorly rated coin- 
ids'. 
Willi these Eacts in mind, obvious questions arise. How 
can we gel more viewers to watch our commercials? 
How '.in we gel them to remember our sales messages? 
Mow can we gel them to bu) our products? 

Here are l<» simple "common sense" principles which 
ma) help you to arrive at successful conclusions. I've 
developed these .1- .1 resull of a stud) I did at Pace College. 
I had a panel of 5 I -indents analyze about 400 commer- 
cials. Reactions ol the students together with m\ own 
conclusions are the Foundation For the points below. It is 
to I"- remembered thai these are nol "tricks" bul practical 
i\ techniques which have been tried and proven effective. 





Irving Settel: he 
doubles in brass as 
New York tv adman, 
college educator 



author Settel lives n busj and t\ filled 
life. He is Tv Sales Promotion Consultant for 
such firm-, as Du Mont T\ Network, Peck Adver 
tisinj : s, [no. At the same 

he i- :m instructor ;>t k's Pace 

College, »rll known bus where he 

tv course. • Creator of A B( ' TV '- 
• • \\ In. 'a the Boss, ' ' he is " T\ 

Advertising .v Production Haudl k" and 

' ' ["op Tv Shows of tin \Y:ir.' * 

uhlished by H:i*tir . 




1. Demonstrate 

wherever 

possible 



One of the most effective television techniques is demon- 
stration. It i- almost unbelievable how mam current t\ 
advertisers ignore this obvious principle. Psychologists 
indicate thai people are more likel) to watch and remem- 
ber claim- ol product performance if thej see that per- 
formance demonstrated and proved. A good rule to re- 
membei then, is to describe . . . and demonstrate e\er\ 
sales claim made in the cop) . 



2. Correlate 
audio with 
video 



\n appeal to the eye a- well as the ear creates a double 
sensory impression. Television commercials are most effec- 
tive when sound and sight are coordinated into a single 
dynamic message. 

Television's mosl significant sales asset is its ability to 
combine sight plus sound in a commercial message. The 
advertise] who neglects appeal to one sense and concen- 
trate- onl) on the other i- missing oul on tv's most power- 
ful persuasive force. 



2. Keep 

commercials 

simple 





ggg § 2 5 



40 



One of the most common error- in the making of televi- 
sion commercials i- to take the "slam-bang" approach. 
Frequently, one-minute commercials become virtual "pro- 
ductions" with everything in hut "the kitchen -ink. lhis 
concept i- a sure wa) of driving \<uir listener out of the 
loom in despair 1 or for a glass of water'. 

I he commercial should make it eas) lor the viewer u> 
grasp the -ale- points. \ simple commercial with a lim- 
ited number of elements and presentations will increase 
listenership and "recall" of -ale- points. 

SPONSOR 



commercials 



Tips based on study of 100 commercials 
give you some basic do's and don'ls 




4. Repeat and 
repeat and 
repeat 



The well known after-dinner speaker's lot inula to "tell 
'em what you're going to say, say it, and then tell 'em what 
you've said' is a good rule of thumb in television. Re- 
membrance can be increased substantial!) In recapitulat- 
ing and summarizing the sales points. 



5- Avoid 

trick 

devices 



There is an overwhelming temptation among producers 
to use trick shots, montages and the hundreds of other spe- 
cial television effects available. Frequentl; . these are forced 
and misused and there is the inevitable lo s of recall 
quality so necessarv to effective selling. 



6. Use 




appropriate 
salespeople 




Compatibilit) with the product must be your announc- 
er's most important characteristic. He or she must look 
the part, feel the part, act the part of the product repre- 
sentative. The over-all feeling of sincerity should prevail 
at all times. The "pitchman" attitude is suitable only to 
a limited number of products. 



7. Use 

appropriate 
testimonials 



If )our commercial calls for the use of testimonials, try 
to select "real" people. There is nothing more disconcert- 
ing to an audience than to view a glamorous actress taking 
the part of a typical housewife. To represent "average" 
people, use "average" looking actors with sincerity, not 
beauty as the most important attribute. 





8. Avoid 

distracting 

presentations 



In printed advertising, the "eternal" female frequently 
supersedes the product itself. I lii- can be disastrous on 
television. Scantily clad models lake attention away from 
the product being -"Id. When a photogenic model i- used 
to show product, she should be Fully clothed so that there 
will be little or no distractions from tin- -air- message. 



9. Use 

authentic 
settings 



Set \niir stage for the commercial as authentically as 
possible. Housewives should be in the kid lim. business- 
men in an office. Every background element should eon- 
tribute lo the sales impression which the commercial is 
lr\ ins to make. 




10. Sell the 
"sizzle not 
the steak" 




tfirfwtK 



More than ever on television. Elmer Wheeler's famous 
slogan becomes important. Food products are particularly 
subject to this tvpe of selling. Show the foods in such a 
way that they look "good enough to eat." Wherever pos- 
sible, show them being made, being eaten in enjoyment. 
Favorable sensorv impressions of a product make the 
viewer feel that he can "almost smell them cooking." 
I his is what sells merchandise. 



// is possible to increase the effectiveness of your 
television commercials with creative thinking 
and intelligent application of simple sellinu 
techniques. The 10 principles mentioned above 
will not automatically produce perfect commercials. 
However, adherence to these principles plus 
common sense will raise the performance levels 
of the sales messages and eventually sell more 
merchandise over the counter. * * * 



26 JULY 1954 



41 





Ford dealer in Wilkes-Barre 
reeentlj sold 32 used cars 
as a result of weekly 
news show cost : $148 
total on WBRE-TV, Ch. 
28. I iustomers saw show 
as Ear as 7<> miles away 




Single minute announce- 
ment on WKXX-TV. 
Ch. •">" in Saginaw-Bay 
city. Mich., sold $2,364 
worth ul' "Television 
Rockers" at a cost to the 
furniture dealer <>f $S 



How well can iilil sell ? 

In many markets the only television is uhf. but even in mixed 

\ hi -n lit areas advertisers on uhf lia\e g€>tten 30-to-l sales returns 



The case histories in this 
report indicate just hou 
effective your ti advertising 
< an be on ///// telex ision 
stations. They give tangible evi- 
dence oj success l>\ mam i dried 
1 1 pes oj sponsoi s. \e •./ issue 
a ill contain n report on the 
present-da 1 ) status oj uhf, 
including data <>n numbet ul 
stations, conversion figures, />/»<■ 
oj competition, mm Lei sizes. 



J n recent weeks headlines out of 
\\ u-hington have painted an often- 
dreary picture of ultra-high-frequenc) 
tele\ ision. 

\dnien exposed to these stories 
about uhf problems often wind up 
with this impression: I hf is itself the 
problem. 

But the real problem which faces 
uhfers and the one which concern- 
admen the most is actually nol one of 
"frequencj " or "conversion" or "pic- 
ture quality." \- stations themselves 
see it, uhf's biggest beadache toda> 
centers around the sort "I competitive 
situation in which uhf station opera- 
tors End themselves. How uhf stations 
solve competitive problems within 



their markets, if they face them, is 
often the key to that stations useful- 
ness in a tv station lineup. 

As far as advertisers and agencies 
are concerned, the present hassle over 
uhf can be boiled down to just four 
main point-: 

Point One: There- nothing "wrong" 
with uhf as a medium of tv transmis- 
sion. It has its own special character- 
istics. Some are good; some are bad. 
It i- more limited in it- range than 
vhf. in most cases. In intermixed mar- 
kets viewers must often be persuaded 
to convert their set- to pick up uhf. 
Bui uhf i- jus! as much "television' 
..- ,- vhf. 

Point Two: \- an ad manager or 



42 



SPONSOR 



timebuyer you're on shaky grounds 
when you make any sweeping "don't 
buy*' rules ahout uhf. According to 
the FCC, eventual!) some 20,00(1.0(1(1 
people will look to uhf as their onh 
form of tv. You can't even generalize 
about uhf in intermixed situations. 
Too many uhf stations are winning 
their uphill battle for audiences and 
high conversion rates in the face of 
stiff vhf competition. 

Point Three: lou have a bigger 
stake in uhf than \ou think. Statistics 
show that competitive tv markets near- 
ly always show a lower cost-per-1,000 
tv homes for advertisers than do non- 
competitive markets. Uhf is still the 
only way by which the time-clearance 
logjam in one-station vhf markets can 
be broken. 

Point Four: Few uhf operators want 
special favors or expect advertising 
charity. But they do ask to be exam- 
ined on their own merits. The national 
advertiser who fails to examine the 
uhf-only and uhf-vhf markets one at a 
time is taking a chance, the tv broad- 
casters in the upper spectrum say, on 
missing a good tv time slot or a good 
'"growth opportunity." 

This is not an idle broadside on the 
part of uhf operators hankering for tv 
business. Uhf stations feel they are in 
a good position to help advertisers like 
the ones described below: 

• The lately arrived network adver- 
tiser who has had to take some bad 
time slots on jam-packed vhf outlets in 
what used to be big one-station mar- 
kets. Advertisers will often find 
that their network tv ratings in these 
markets, due to the fact that they are 
on the air in margin slots because of 
general crowding of network shows, 
are barely as good as the national av- 
erage rating. Sometimes they are sev- 
eral notches below the national level. 
Uhf stations in these intermixed mar- 
kets can sometimes offer time slots with 
a better audience potential — and at 
lower cost. 

• The national spot advertiser who 
wants to establish good franchise slots. 
It was the willingness to pioneer, back 
in 1948 and 1949, that enabled adver- 
tisers like Bulova, Benrus, General 
Foods and the cigarette companies to 
move in on nighttime Class A tv spot 
periods and stay there. As network 
programs next to these slots grew in 

(Please turn to page 94) 



UHF STATiOJV RESULTS 



Winston-Salem, IS. C. (WTOB-TV; Ch, 26): Twin City Pack- 
ing Co. bought a 15-minutc segment of locally produced tv 
barn dance show, "Hoedown Party," opposite CBS TV's 
"Jackie Gleason." Show boosted sausage sales 60%, over-all 
sales 30%. No other advertising was used. 

Vp rp 9p 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (W1LK-TV; Ch. 34): This outlet, one 
of two uhf outlets in city, does strong local program job in 
addition to ABC TV, DTN service. Grant Tool Co. averages 
150 orders for Gay Blade per announcement. Popular 
"Carousel" show sold 1,000 pairs of socks in one week 
for Hub store. Tv drive for "The Robe" brought second 
biggest day's gross in local Paramount theatre's history. 



¥ 



# 



Columbia, S. C. (WCOS-TV; Ch. 25): This ABC TV affiliate 
competes with both a uhf ami a vhf station in its area, but 
has racked up some good sales results. Last winter, one spot 
announcement for Hillman's Sporting Goods store sold 18 
English bicycles at $64.95 apiece. Winter business for the 
firm was generally 10% higher. Hillman's now rates uhf 
over newspaper, direct mail media. 

*& v *p 

Baton Rouge, La. (W AFB-TV; Ch. 28): Although market is 
due to become intermixed in September, uhf outlet has had 
a good chance to establish itself, build an audience. Local 
Admiral dealer used a full-page ad in local paper, sold one 
range. Then, he tried one five-minute show on WAFB-TV, 
sold 14 ranges. Dalton's Department store used one live 
minute spot, promptly sold 400 dozen sets of glassware to 
uhf viewers. Kean's Laundry sponsors filmed "I Led 3 
Lives," soon rolled up 20% increase in fur storage business. 



* 



* 



Muncie, Ind. (WLBCTV; Ch. 49): Station serves over 
71,000 uhf homes in its market, is affiliated with all four 
networks, says ''there's nothing wrong with uhf technically." 
Uptown Tire Sales, sponsor of late news show, showed third 
highest percentage of increase in sales of Armstrong tires 
in entire U.S. Chevrolet dealer sold six new cars as the 
result of one 1 5-minute d. j. telecast. 



26 JULY 1954 



43 




notaries on the air 

Television demons! rail ions help bring baby industry 
into $72 million amiiinllv elnss within a year 



#n the lil ill centurj V.D. Hungarians 
rode meal —« ► i t under the saddle. ( u I i - 
narj refinements progressed until L8th 
( mini \ I- 1. in e w hen one hel claimed 
the onl) was to cook an egg was to 
place ii inside a pigeon, put the pigeon 
inside a duck, the duck inside a pig. 
the pig inside an ox, roasl the ox slow- 
l\ on a spit, throw awaj the ox, pig. 
duck and pigeon I ill mmm, l><>\ 
what an e 

During the pasl two years rotisserie 
manufacturers have been using televi- 
sion to persuade American housewives 

thai ll nl\ \\.i\ to make an egg, 

duck, cutlet, or even pit-, for that mat- 
ter, i- on one "I the mam brands of 
1 1 ii--. 1 1 ts i in rentl) flooding the I nit- 
ed States 11 arket. 



Rotisseries had been sold earlier 
than two years ago. Some pioneer 
broiler manufacturers sa) as long as 
15 years ago. But il was no! until 
L953, when Broil-Quik and Roto-Broil 
Look their stor) to television, thai 
housewives in large numbers realized 



round-up 



the rotisserie is an electronic wonder 
the) cm mi do without. Ihis sudden 
fad in electrical home appliances rep- 
resented a national broiler sales jump 
from $7,200,000 in 1951 to $13,172,- 
000 iii 1952. The big jump was in 
L953 lu S72. 1 million. I Figures from 



Electrical Merchandising, January 

1954.) 

The two leaders in the broiler field, 
Peerless Electric (manufacturers of 
Broil-Quik) and Roto-Broil Corp. of 
America (manufacturers of Roto- 
Broil) <-all their products "television 
babies. 

According to industry sources Broil- 
Quik and Roto-Broil together account 
for over 609* of total national rotis- 
serie sales. Nine other elei tri< appli- 
ance manufacturers produce broiler- 
rotisseries, bul none of these promotes 
rotisseries with either the aggressive- 
ness or the budget of the two indepen- 
dents who're the giants in this field. 

Here. then, is how these two rotis- 
serie giants (Broil-Quik and Roto- 



Roto-Broils locally placed cooki.ng show, "Roto Magician," sells 
housewives on versatility of firm's electronic cooking appliance. 



Lester Morris, star of this 15-minute film show, gives in-store demon- 
strations, as shown below, in major markets where film series is telecast 




Broil) made America rotisserie-con- 
scious. 

Broil-^tiik was introduced 1>\ Peer- 
less Electric in January 1951. Until 
1952, however, advertising was mostly 
local newspaper advertising in New 
York, Broil-Quik's first and major 
market. Despite the modest advertis- 
ing effort through Zlowe Agency un- 
til 1953. the firm claims to have 
grossed $2 million in 1951 — then, as 
result of expanded distribution, $4 
million in 1952. 

When Broil-Quik entered production 
in 1950, the firm had only three com- 
petitors in the infra-red broiler line. 
B\ 1953, some 10 other firms had en- 
tered the field — one of them, Roto- 
Broil Corp. of America, which had a 
particularly aggressive advertising pro- 
gram. To hold its Number One sales 
position against the increased compe- 
tition, Broil-Quik stepped up its own 
advertising. 

Broil-Quik"s budget for 1953 was 
$500,000. In the beginning of the 
year Max Steinbook, Broil-Quik's pres- 
ident and advertising strategist, leaned 
heavily toward full-color page ads in 
such national magazines as Saturday 
Evening Post, Good Housekeeping. La- 



Ik rotisserie business: a quick look at its history and advertising 

fft.vfori/: A step-child of the electrical appliance industrj for 15 years, 
rotisseries began showing sales -^t iii l<-< in 1931 and 1952 as a resull of nu 
gressive advertising on tin pari of newcomers Broil-Quik and Roto Broil. 

I'.ntli linns li^lit out New Yoik, country's most lucrative rotisserie market. 

/lfli"<»r<i.vin«j: 1'ntil Roto Broil's entrj into the race in 1953, Broil-Quik 
was Number One. Budget \\ :i s split between magazines, newspapers and tv. 
Then Roto-Broil pu1 over 8095 of its budget into spol t\ programing and 
rose to Broil-Quik's sales level within a year. Broil-Quik tights back withtv. 

Problems: Because its owners are independents and newe rs in electri 

cal appliances, the rotisserie business lacks the distribution outlets to grow 
smoothly with increased demand. Price cutting by New York discount 
houses and a price war between the two giants eu1 deep into their profits. 



v 



: 




dies' Home Journal. His idea at that 
time was to build Broil-Quik as a pres- 
tige product with class-appeal adver- 
tising. 

By mid-year, however, it became 
apparent that Broil-Quik's major com- 
petitor, Roto-Broil. was throwing the 
entire weight of its advertising budget 
into tv. Broil-Quik reexamined its 
budget. 

At the beginning of 1053 Broil-Quik 



had planned to split the $500,000 bud- 
get this \\a\ : 40' < for national maga- 
zines; 20 ''/< tv; 20% for newspaper 
ads; 20/V point-of-sale. 

By summer 1953 Steinbook became 
convinced that tv should come in for a 
larger share of Broil-Quik expendi- 
tures. In New York alone Broil-Quik 
bought into four tv shows: the first 
half of The Jerry Lester Show, W ABC 
i Please turn to page 90) 



Peerless Electric Products sells its Broil-Quik via woman-appeal tv 
shows like NBC TV's "Home" show. Below, J. Lanigan, NBC Eastern 



sis. mgr., Arlene Francis, star of "Home," H. J. Holbrook, Peerless 
v.p., and Max Steinbook, pres., sign for Broil-Quik participation 



I 




Irresistible! 



As captivating ... as beguiling ... as irresistible today on television 
as she has always been on stage, screen and radio. 

As hostess and often star of Crown Theatre * 
Gloria Swanson consistently outdraws her competition 
— including top network shows in many major markets. 

And as the fascinating focal point of a complete 
merchandising follow-up, she has the kind of appeal 

that makes her public a buying public. 
To assure your product an enthusiastic welcome, 
make an entrance with Gloria Swanson. 

We'll be happy to introduce you. 



CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES 

in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, 

Dallas. St. Louis. Detroit, Atlanta and Boston. 
Distributor in Canada: S. W. ('alducll Ltd. 



original half-hour dramas 



m 




^H 










f. Y«»ir siriiion on «ir 





CALL 
LETTERS 


CHANNEL 
NO 


ON-AIR 
DATE 


POWER 


IKWI" 


NET 
AFFILIATION 


STNS. 
ON AIR 1 


SETS IN 
MARKET' 

10001 


PERMITEE 4. MANAGER ! 




CITY 4 STATE 


| VI8UAL | 


AURAL 


REP 


MISSOULA, MONTANA 


KGVO-TV 


13 


1 July 


60 


30 


CBS 





NFA 


Mosby's Int. 

A. J. Mosby. mgr 

Dick Coon, prog. dir. 


Bill- 

Perna 


ENID. OKLAHOMA 


KGEO-TV 


5 


15 July 


100 


50 


ABC 





50 


Str'iti Electronics. Inc 
George Streets, wt'y 4. 

mgr. 
P R Banta. prtv 
Tom Belcher, eomml. 

mgr. 


John 
Pear s*a 


INDIANAPOLIS, 
INDIANA 


WISH-TV 


8 


1 July 


316 


158 


basic ABC 
primary: 
NBC, DuMont, 
CBS 


1 


427 


Universal Bdestg 

C. Bruce McConnell. 

pres. 
Robt McConnell. v p A. 

gen. mgr. 


Boiling 
Co. 


DECATUR, ALABAMA 


WMSL-TV 


23 


4 July 


21.5 


12 









NFA 


Tennessee Valley Bdestg 
Frank Whisnant. pres. 
Bill Guy. genl. mgr. 


Walker 








TERRE HAUTE, 


WTHI-TV 


10 


20 July 


316 


158 


CBS, DuMont 





101 


W.-taih Valley Bdestg 


Boiling 
Co 


INDIANA 


















Anton Hulman Jr.. pres. 
Jim Hlgglns. genl. mgr 





ff. New construction permits 



CITY & STATE 



DOTHAN, ALABAMA 
HENDERSON, NEVADA 



DAYTONA BEACH, 
FLORIDA 

TULSA, OKLAHOMA 



WMFJ-TV 2 

2 



CALL 


1 CHANNEL 
NO. 


DATE OF 
GRANT 


ON-AIR 
TARGET 


POWER (KW)" 1 


STATIONS 


LETTERS 


VISUAL | AURAL 


ON AIR 




9 


2 July 




55.6 27.8 







2 


2 July 




10.96 5.48 






SETS IN 

MARKET' 
(0001 



PERMITEE A. MANAGER 



8 July 
8 July 



1.26 .72 



100 



50 



NFA 



NFA 



NFA 



NFA 



Ala-Fla-Ga Bdestg 
Charles Woods, pres. 
J. T. Thrower, v. p. 

Southwestern Pub. Co 
Donald W. Reynolds. 

pres. 
A. E. Calahan. v. p. 
Thcodo-e Nelson. secy 

Telrad, Inc. 

W. Wright Esch. pres. 



Central Plains Enter- 
Wm. Skelly. pres. 



RADIO 
REP1 



McGillvra 



Since sponsor's 28 June listing, three 
more television stations have gone off 
the .iii but retained their permits. An- 

OFFTHE AIR 

PRINCETON, Ind., WRAY-TV, uhf ch. 52. 
Began operating 6 Dec. 1953, ended 15 
July 1954. 

DULUTH. Mich., WFTV, uhf ch. 38, began 
operating 31 May 1953, ended 15 July 1954. 



Iff. Addentla to previous listings 

other station has suspended operations 
temporarily. Two more stations have 
relinquished their c.p.'s (raising the 

HOUSTON, Tex., KNUZ-TV, uhf ch. 39, began 
operating 10 Oct. 1953, ended 25 June 
1954. 

PITTSBURGH, Pa., WKJF-TV, uhf ch. 53, be- 
gan operating 14 July 1953, ended 2 July 
1954 



number (if c.p.'s returned to the Fl < 
to 84 1. All six stations mentioned be- 
low are uhf outlets. 

C.P.s RELINOUISHED 

CHAMPAIGN, III., WCUI, uhf ch. 21 (FCC 
cancelled c.p. for lack of prosecution). 

PITTSFIELD. Mass., WBEC-TV, ch. 64 (FCC 
cancelled at request of grantee). 







RftY SPHRF 






U. S. stations on air, inrl. 
Honolulu am! Alaska I 18 
June '."> 1 I 
Markets covered 


'.77 

2.1 r. 


DUA olufiL 

Post-freeze cp's granted (ex- 
cluding 30 educational grants; 
18 Juh '54) 
Grantees on air 


r,r, 1 
27.1 


Tv homes in I . S. i 1 June 

•54) 30,411,0009 

I >". homes with tv sets (1 

I unc "54) 64% 







•Both new rp'i and nations tolnc on the air listed here are those which occurred between 
1 Juli and itlom aro 

HOildarad ... tie on the air when commercial operation starts. "Power of c.p.'i It that recorded 
tr. I i < .» the number of sets 

In market, srl as being from SBC Rcjaarch, conillti of estimates from the 

nations or reps and muii be deemed approximate. IDaia from NBC Research and Planning 
Percentages on homes with sets and homes In tr coverage areas are considered approximate. Ilo 



48 



mott cues, the representative of ■ radio station which Is granted a c.p alto representi the | 
»t operation SI ore at presitlme it i> generally too early to ronflnn f represematicr * 
Krantees. SPONSOR ii ■• thi rep( ol ihe ra»l ■ 

hem kiwi mi u grant t NKA No flcuref arailable «t presstime on seta in mat 
17% li number Includi 

SKVOO Tu 



SPONSOR 



Tricks like this 



are sure-fire. They lift TV audiences right out of their 
seats — especially when spotted in "live" shows. 
Easy to produce, too — entertainment or commercial 
— when you USE EASTMAN FILM. 

For complete information — what film to use, 
latest processing technics — write to: 

Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 




tt Coast Division 
342 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, N. Y. 



Midwest Division 

137 North Wabash Avenue 

Chicago 2, Illinois 



West Coast Division 
6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, California 



7 * i 



Agents for the distribution and sale of Eastman Professional Motion Picture Films: 

W. J. GERMAN, INC. 

Fort Lee, N. J., Chicago, III., Hollywood, California 



HERE'S A TIP. Do it in COLOR. 
Chances are, you'll be needing it. 







His viewers think he's the 

SMARTEST MAN IN 
SAN FRANCISCO 

(his local sponsors think jhey are!) 




Time isn't always available on "William Winter and the News," San Francisco's 
longest continuously-sponsored program (one segment by the same 
sponsor for over five years). 

As this is written, it is, and it's worth checking for William Winter means 
sure-fire penetration of Northern California. 

Consistently among the top ten multi-weekly TV programs since 1952 (something 
no other local origination can boast), "William Winter and the News," 

with Winter's startlingly accurate analysis of world and national events, has 
an almost fanatically loyal and responsive audience of thinking Californians. 

Ask your Katz man about this "open Sesame" to sales. 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
affiliated with CBS and DuMont Television Networks 
represented by the Kati Agency 



50 



SPONSOR 



Illllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllll!llllllll!lllll!l!l!illlilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllim Illlllllllllll ill! IIIIIIIIWI Illllllll llllllllllllllllllllli:illlllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH'!j 



| Tv film shows recently made available for syndication 

Programs issued since March 7 954. Next chart will appear 23 August 

Il!IIUIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllllllllllll!llllllllllll!!lllll!!llll!IIIH 



Show name 



Syndicates 



Producer 



Length No. in series 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length No. in serial 



ADVENTURE 



Jet Jackson, Fly- Screen Gems 
ing Commando*) 



Screen Gems 



Rin Tin Tin' 



Screen Gems Screen Gems 



Stories of the Hollywood Tv Studio City Tv 30 min. 

Century Service Prod. 



CHILDREN'S 



Playtime with 
Jerry Bartell 



15 min. 



The Amazing Talei Interstate Tv 
of Hans Chris- 
tian Andersen 



Sterling Jerry Bartell 

Natl. Telefilm Natl. Comics 

Interstate Tv 30 min 



30 min. 
15 min. 



COMEDY 



Meet Corliss 
Archer* 



Meet the O'Briens Official 
The Little Rascals Interstate 



Stuart Reynolds 30 min. 



20 min. 
10 min. 



DOCUMENTARY 



Impact 

Tenth of a Nation Essex Films 



Natl. Telefilms Herbert Breg- 
stein 



Where Were You? UTP 



American News- 15 min. 
reel 



Bing Crosby 



DRAMA. MYSTERY 



Douglas Falrbanki Interstate Tv 
Presents 



Fabian of Scotlanc 


Telefilm 


Yard 




Man Behind the 


MCA 


Badge 




Mayor of the 


UTP 


Town' 




Paris Precinct 


MPTv 



Dougfair Prod. 30 min. 
Trinity Prod. 30 min. 

Procktor 30 min. 



Sherlock Holmes MPTv 

Tales of Tomorrow TeeVce 



The Eddie Cantor Ziv 
Theatre 



Gross- Krasne 


30 min 


Etoile Frod. 


30 min 


Sheldon Reynolds 


30 min 


G. Foley 


30 min 


Ziv 


30 min 


Interstate Tv 


30 min 



The Ethel Barry- Interstate Tv Interstate Tv 

more Theatre 



The Falcon 



NBC TV Film Federal Telefilm! 30 min. 



The Heart of Jul- MPTv 
let Jones 



Charles Irving 30 min. 



The Lone Wolf United Tv Pro- Gross- Krasne 3u mm. 

grams 
The Star and the Official 4-Star Prod. 30 min. 

Storyi 



The Whistlen 



CBS TV Film Leslie Parsons 30 min. 



Vltapix Feature Vitaplx 

Theatre 



Princess Picture! 5.3 min. 

65-80 min. 



United Tv Pro- Roland Reed 

grams 



30 min. 



26 
26 



52 
168 



26 



39 

I0O 



39 
39 
26 

39 

39 
26 

39 
13 

39 
26 

39 
39 

39 
26 



EDUCATIONAL 



This is Charles 
Laughton 



Walt's Workshop Reid Ray 



Gregory- Harris 15 min. 

Reld Ray 30 min. 



HILLBILLY 



Juniper Junction, Essex Films Fotovox 30 min. 26 

U.S.A. 



Town & Country Official Films Byron Prod. 30 min. 

Timea 



MUSIC 



Florlan ZaBach Guild Films 

Show> 



Frankle Laine 

Show i 



Horace Heldt 
Show' 



Nickelodeon 

Series 



Guild Films 
Guild Films Guild Films 

Consolidated Tv Geo. Bagnall 
Geo. Bagnall 



30 min. 



The Guy Lombardo MCA 
Show 



This Is Your 

Mum. 



MCA 



NEWS 



Adventures in 
the News 



Sterling 



SPORTS 



Great Guys and United World Zach Baym 

Goats 



Jalopy Races from HarrlScope 
Hollywood 

Post Time, U.S.A. Tel Ra 

Sports Mirror Geo. Bagnall 

The Big Playback" Screen Gems 



HarriScope 



This Week in 
Sports 



INS 



VARIETY 



Date with a Star' Consolidated Tv Geo. Bagnall 15 min. 

Movie Museum Sterling Blograph 15 min. 



WOMEN'S 



Kling Studios Kling Studios 30 min. 



26 



Tel Ra 


15 min. 


52 


Wickham Films 


15 min. 


26 


Screen Gems 


15 min. 


26 


Telenews 






Hearst- 


15 min. 


52 


Metrotone 







26 
26 



•Sold to Bhelngold Hi California. N. Y. C. New Haven and Blnghamton. Other markets available for sale to local spom - I to Pacific Telephone n Call o 

Washington and ^Oregon Other markets available to local si ors. «ATallable in color. .Available I 3. - ■•■> markets Bes avail. 

spoors Vhe VVanler Co .Chicago (Ovalllne) is sponsoring the show nationally under the title. "Captain Midnight." A separate series ,s ava.lable for local SI 
the markets not covered by Ovalllne. SPONSOR invites all tv film syndicatora to send information on new 



26 JULY 1954 



(See film notes, page 56) 



51 



,ot» 



ZIV'S NEW $Al£$ C 



Hollywood's Dynamic 

DAVID BRIAN 

in the powerful role of 



W m 




4&**n& ' 











THE B E H I N 



D - T H E 







^MYSTERY on the air 




is practically 



.4IHJJ.il, 



EE OF 



HAVE YOU SEEN THE B.A.B. SURVEY* 
OF "THE CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE OF 
RADIO MYSTERY DRAMA PROGRAMS'? 



Champion of the 
people, defender 
of truth, guardian 
of our fundamental 
rights to life, liberty 
and the pursuit of 
: happiness. 




i 



WW FOR RADIO ADVERTISERS! 



DRAMA OF OUR 



IN ACTION! 



TESTED and PROVED... 

No.1 MYSTERY on the Air! 



NATIONALLY 



HIGH RATINGS! i« 

in survey after survey* ... for 12 years among 
the nation's top-rated shows. 

•National Hooper and local Pulse ratings on request. 

LONG-TERM RENEWALS! 

Renewed for 12 consecutive years by one of the 
largest firms** in a highly competitive field. 

"Name on request. 

SENSATIONAL SALES RESULTS! 

j During this 12 year period, the sponsor's annual 
[sales increased nearly 300 °/« 



'%.*** 



•From $17Vi million to over %AS million. 







listeners live the 

liil.l l!HI9iiHIH.j J. 



AND ACTION 



as MR. D. A., HARRINGTON and MISS 
MILLER match wits with the underworld. 



Gal in touch with us now . . . wire, phone, write for full 
FACTS ON THIS NEW SALES PLAN FOR ADVERTISERS! 



f3 FULL-LENGTH SELLING 



JSOR I 





1ST 

CHEMU1S 




25,000 WATTS! 



TOWER POSITION HIGHER! 

WATTAGE TRIPLED! 

MARKET COVERAGE. ..SATURATION! 

— and a big plus ! ! ! I 

Fantastic is the word — the word for the wav viewers 
of the Rochester area have, during these first eight 
months, welcomed Channel 10 into their living 
rooms. It's the word, too, for the was local, national 
and network sponsors have gobbled up our time 
. . . that, of course, is what top programming does 
for a station! 

st look up the Rochester Spring "Hooper"* your- 
If — check rates — study our coverage map above — 
en consider this new Channel 10 up in power! . . . 
e'll wager vou'll be asking us for availabilities! 

ON CHANNEL 10. — The strong CBS daytime 
s our own smash local participating programs 
15 to 20 ratings, some adjacencies to ratings 
9 — vet at our low, low class "C" rates. 



CHANNEL 10 



V H F 




W/'FV uovs all out to 
promote Hiss I uiverse 

Radio station \\ IMA in Philadel- 
phia undertook t < » introduce, promote 

and aii the judging of the local run- 

olf of tin- "Miss I niverse" contest re- 

centl) ami (lid the whole job in less 

than L00 hour-. It was the sole medi- 
um through which the contest -for 
"Miss Eastern Pennsylvania" was 
promoted. 

\\ PEN executives made plans for 
production and promotion oi tin* con- 
test in conjunction with the 1'atricia 




ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



EVERETT-McKINNEY, INC. • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES • THE BOILING CO.. INC. 



Steve Allison with Miss Eastern Pa. finalists 

Stevens Finishing School f<n Models 
and Careei Girls, completed them on 
Tuesday, 2 ( ) June. First announcement 
of the contest was aired that night on 
the Steve Mix"/! Show, a late-night 
sabfest on \\ PEN. I>v earh noon on 
Wednesday, the fir-t entrant- arrived 
at the Patricia Steven- School and the 
screening was <>n. Bj Friday, -i\ 
judges were named. On Saturday at 

12 noon, the finalists were -elected. 

The finals <>f the contest were sched- 
uled for midnight airing in the W PI N 
studios on the Steve illison Show. 
Crowds started to arrive at (> p.m., 
filled the studio to capacit) l«v ' > : 1 ~» 
Hv 10:15 p.m.. police had to be called 
to control the crowd- wanting to enter 
the studio. Considerately, the station 
supplied street amplifiers so that the 
overflow out-id.' could at least hear 
the goings-on. 

The contest began at 12:0."> a.m. and 

\li— Eastern Pennsylvania (Elaine 

DuFeen, 22) was picked at 1:40 a.m. 

• * * 



54 



SF0NS0R 







WSLS 'Sidewalk Radio Studios 

Radio station WSLS in Roanoke. 
Va., has moved its studios to a 
street corner in the heart of that city's 
downtown district. Object: to exploit 
itself and to bring its operation closer 
to the public. Result: greatly hypoed 
public interest and upped sales for 
sponsors. 

The WSLS studios (which opened 
Memorial Day) are set up and dec- 
orated with a view to being eye-catch- 
ing and appealing to passersby. Offi- 
cials of the station estimate that dur- 
ing f8 hours of each day, some 24.000 
persons pass by the corner (First 
Street and Church Avenue) on which 
the studio is located. 

Since the opening, thousands of peo- 
ple have visited the studios, the station 
reports. Spectators are invited to par- 
ticipate on local shows and inspect ra- 
dio equipment. Each guest is given a 
map illustrating WSLS air coverage. 

Sponsors are profiting from the new 
setup, too. Merchandise of advertis- 
ers using the station is on display in 
the large windows of the studios as 
well as within. These displays are en- 
hanced by the carnival atmosphere of 
the studios, promoted mainly by a red- 
and-white striped canopy which covers 
the entire ceiling. Sponsors exhibiting 
products include Singer Vacuum Clean- 
er, Hammond Organ, General Tire, 
Sunnyside Awning Co. 

Pedestrians looking in the windows 
can learn the latest in weather, news 
and sports, as well as the program on 

Carnival air of street studio stops passersby 



i 




* attravt public, €tid sponsors 

the air at the moment. A large ther- 
mometer, a clock and weather fore- 
cast dial, a sports scoreboard, an As- 
sociated Press teletype machine and an 
easel with title cards of programs make 
this possible. 

One-third of the studio space is oc- 
cupied with a record and transcription 
library for the convenience of disk 
jockeys. The walls feature pictures of 
local and network air personalities. 

Since it has established the new 
"Sidewalk Studios," WSLS reports, it 
has found "fresh vitality" for opera- 
tion. + • • 



Crosley stirs summer air 
with "Operation Sunburst" 

"Audiences and sales are like plants 
— they wilt when not watered with 
good programs, strong advertising, po- 
tent promotion, meaty merchandising." 
This is the philosophy under which the 
Crosley Broadcasting WLW radio and 
tv stations are running their $100>000 
summer promotion, "Operation Sun- 
burst," for the fourth year. 

"Sunburst" revolves around three 
major efforts (in addition to a public- 
ity barrage through a variety of out- 
lets) : 

1. A "Famous Face" contest, which 
started 1 July. One section per day of 
a jigsawed face of a famous person is 
flashed on the tv screens. Each day, a 
new section of the face is added, as is 
an additional prize. The first 10 view- 
ers to identify the face receive prizes, 
then compete against each other to 
identify a second "Famous Face." 
Winner gets a huge jackpot. 

2. A premium package to move 
products. This is a set of six 15-ounce 
glass tumblers, decorated with pictures 
and signatures of the leading WLW 
radio and tv stars. It is available to 
persons who mail in SI and proof-of- 
purchase of any product advertised on 
one of the Crosley outlets. This wide- 
spread merchandising program has 
over 20.000 outlets: some 220.000 



pieces oi point-of-sale displa) mate- 
rial lui\ r been disti ibuted \<\ \\ l.\\ - 
merchandising lie-Id forces, marking 
"Sunbursl items w hich i an I"- used 
in procure the glassware. 

A. Building interest in pi o'jiam- li\ 
putting shows on tour, strengthening 
talent ties with audience. Shows loured 
(in studios at l)a\ton and < olumbua 
as well as Cincinnati i include: Uuth 
Lyons' 50-50 Club, Midwestern Ifay- 
i ill V. Waller Phillips Show. * * * 

Muzak oiiers broadcasters 
iirst crack at riahts 

In a new, large-scale expansion, the 
Muzak Corp. is offering established 
broadcasters first chance to obtain ex- 
clusive franchises to the firm's back- 
ground-music library. This applies in 
virtually every U.S. market of 50,000 
or more. 

Sparking this move is a new mag- 
netic tape playback instrument, which 
practically runs itself. It automatically 
starts, stops, pre-selects specialized mu- 
sic as desired, reverses itself and 
changes tracks, rewinds, shuts itself 
off. even switches on a companion tape 
machine to start the process all over. 

Heretofore, due to economic factors, 
including the high cost of maintenance 
of manual disk turntable operation. 
Muzak has restricted franchise opera- 
tions almost entirely to markets of 
200,000 or more. But the new high 
fidelity mechanism has so reduced ba- 
sic costs that franchises can now be 
supported in markets of 50,000 or 
more. 

Muzak's background-music library 
currently embraces over 7,000 selec- 
tions. Restaurants, banks, hotels, fac- 
tories, offices, supermarkets and other 
organizations in major markets have 
been using Muzak's system for 20 
years. 



• • • 



26 JULY 1954 



Briefly . . . 

WSAZ-TV, Huntington. \\ . Va., is- 
sues a small folder to aid lady and gen- 
tleman program guests in their tv ap- 
pearances. It suggests proper apparel 
and makeup, points out meanings of 
cues and hand signals, gives general 
instructions on before-camera behav- 
ior. Ladies, for instance, should wear 
plain pastels or greys, no white dresses, 
no large brim hats, shiny jewelry or 
eye shadow. Gentlemen should pref- 
I Please turn to page 105) 



55 




for a 

BIG 



uiu selling 
\ job -use the 



station 



in the Wheeling 



.market . . . 




IN POWER 



operoting with 316,000 watts, 
channel 7 , the most powerful 
TV station in W. Va., South- 
western Penn, and Eastern Ohio. 




IN PROMOTION 



WTRF-TV program schedules 
are published regularly in more 
than 55 newspapers, including 
3 daily and 2 Sunday Pittsburgh 
papers. Consistent promotion 
for all clients has won for 
WTRf-TV top prizes for out- 
standing efforts. 




PUBLIC PREFERENCE 

Latest Telcpulse survey in 6 
counties adjacent to Wheeling 
gives WTRF-TV 1st 25 most 
popular one-a-week shows and 
1st 15 most popular multi-week- 
ly shows — plus audience pref- 
erence in every lime category. 

WTRF-TV 

NBC Pnmory • ABC Supplementary 

represented by Hollingbery 

Robt. Ferguion • VP & Gen. Mgr. 

Phone Wheeling 1177 

Rodio Affiliate! WTRF & WTRF-FM 



US* 



■ *: x .*:*. ■ ^ A*Jti)£ 



UllllllllllllUllllll 



I IK 



A 
JJ 



ill toil 



Color tips: |„ \,w York earlier this 
month, Dr. Mfred \. Goldsmith, con- 
sultant lt> RCA and board chairman of 
the National Television Film Council, 
relayed to an audience <>l agencymen 
and film producers several ke\ tips 
MFC lia> learned through experiments 
with color film commercials on closed- 
circuit colorcasts: 

1. Shoot "balanced" color. Sa\s 
l)r. Goldsmith: "Make the film right 
to begin with. Don't worr) about try- 
ing to unbalance deliberately in order 
i" correct for am shortcomings in the 
t\ color equipment. II the color- look 
right on film, they'll look right on the 
air." 

2. Screen under tv condition*. Don't 
have your commercial run-throughs 
and critical sessions in a projection 
room with a big screen. Project it on 
a L9-inch screen, or from behind 
ground glass about the same size. 
You'll gel a better idea of how your 
colors will look, and will be able to tell 
il you re crowding in too much. 

■\. Shoot in closeup. Long shots 
should be as brief as possible in color 
commercials, YI'FC feels. Reason: In 
long shots, colors tend more to merge; 
details and contrasts are lost. A red- 
and-white checked tablecloth, for in- 
stance, looks properly checkerboard in 
i loseup. but blends to over-all pink in 
long shots. Flesh tones arc far better 
in closeup. Makeup is about the same 
a- lor an) standard color film -hooting. 

4. I se optical sound. Color film 
projei tors aren t yet developed to han- 
dle the magnetic sound track- now be- 
coming popular in much film work, al- 
though the) probabl) will he in the fu- 
ture. Plan all -omul for standard opti- 
• al sound tracks. 

.">. Get expert opinion: Network film 
men and engineers have now reached 
the degree ol familiarit) with color 
film problems, Dr. Goldsmith feels, 
when the) can view a regular project- 
ed « "loi -' reening and then tell \ mi 
how it will look on color t\. It isn'l 



necessar) to wait for closed-circuit fa- 

cilitie-. which are in great demand for 
other test work. 



Who buy* >em?s \ recent ABC Film 
Syndication -ale- analysis of three of 
ii- syndicated t\ properties shed- some 
light on whethei the heaviest hu\er- of 
film -how- are stations, agencies oi 
clients. 

I he -ale- breakdown was computed 
lor three ol \I'>C Film'- properties, 
Racket Squad, The Playhouse and 
John Kieran's Kaleidoscope. 

Out of a total of ',» sales of Racket 
Squad at the time the anal\-i- wa- 

done 10. or i;;-; ,,f the sale- were 

made to stations; 38, or M)' ; were to 
agencies, and five, or (>' ', were to ad- 
vertisers. 

An analysis of The Playhouse indi- 
cate- that 2d out of a total of 30 sales. 
or 07';. were made to agencies; 10 
sales, or 33%, were to stations and 
none were made direct to advertisers. 

lor Kaleidoscope, the sales break- 
down showed the majority of -ah- 
were made to the stations. Of a total 
of 1 1 -ale- 0. or 82'r . were to sta- 
tions. I here wa- one sale lO'r | to 
an advertiser and one ( 9' , i to an 
agency . 



"hone Wolf" promotion: [ nited 
Telex i-ion Programs has just launched 
a "showmandising" campaign for its 
Lone Wolf half-hour tv film -erics 
which permits sponsors of the -how to 
lie in item- ranging from heer glasses 
lo cuff link-. 

I II' has made available a wide 
range ol displa) material as well a- 
ti I in trailers and slide-, bumper stream- 
ers and Lone II olf stationery. Items 
which tie in with the -how include 
beer and cocktail glasses, tie clasps, 
cuff link-, earrings and lighter-. 

\ cording to \\ \ mi Nathan. \ i< e 
president in charge of sales for I I P, 
promotion and merchandising cam- 
paigns similar to the one outlined 
above will be an integral part of all 
new syndicated film products in the 
future. He emphasized thai sound mer- 
chandising can help bring the local or 
regional sponsor into direct, effective 
competition with a national sponsor. 

• • * 



56 



SPONSOR 



Professional 





for every 
studio set-up 

RCA offers the most complete line of profes- 
sional 45 RPM equipment in broadcasting, 
including: turntables, conversion kits, indi- 
vidual components— everything required to 
meet the specific plans of your station. 

• For fine-groove 45s and 33/3's (exclusively)- up to 
12". Specify RCA's "studio-proved" BQ-1A turn- 
table. Only 28" high, 20" wide, and 16 V 2 " deep, this 
unit is designed specifically for 45's and 33 Vs— 
up to 12" diameter. Complete with lightweight 
tone arm, filter, 1.0 mil pick-up, and a cabinet 
Order MI-11808/11806/11874-4. (Without cabi- 
net, order M 1-11806/1 1874-4.) Immediately avail- 
able from stock. 



• For 33'/), 45, 78-transcriptions. Specify RCA's de- 
luxe BQ-70F Turntable — newest edition of RCA's 
famous 70-series transcription equipment. This 
high-quality unit includes a lightweight tone 
arm, a filter, a 1.0 mil pick-up (for fine-grooves), 
and a 2.5 mil pick-up (for standards). Order 
MI-11818/11885/4975/11874-4/11874-5. (Without 
pick-up and filter, order MI-11818.) Available in 
30 days. 

• For "45s"-on your present RCA 70C, 70D, or 70E 
Turntable. To play "45's" on 70C, 70D, or 70E turn- 
tables, you simply install the RCA 45 RPM 
Conversion Kit that fits your set-up. Check here 
for the kit you need. Available in 30 days. 

( I) Complete4S RPM Modification Kit, including record odoptor plate, ton* 
arm, 1 mil pick-up, and filter. MI-11883 1I8S6 11885 4975 11874-4. 

(2) For 70C, 70D, and 70E turntoblet already equipped with MI-4975 
filter— tpecily kit MI-11883 11886 11885 11874-4. 

(3) for 70C, 70D, and 70E turntablet already equipped with MI-4975 
filter and MI-11874-4 pick-up— tpecily kit MI-11883 11886. 

RCA professional 45 RPM equipment can be 
ordered direct through your RCA Broadcast 
Sales Representative. In Canada, write RCA 
Victor, Ltd., Montreal. 

Pioneers in AM Broadcasting for over 25 years 




RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 




- off* iO^' • 




*« ? A«7A- 5 







*»**: ■■■■' 




ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION 



CAMDEN. N.J. 



^A6-P c y°9 ( . e0 s< S 
ReP' 



EVERY 27 SECONDS SOME 






BODY WRITES TO WBC 



n the first five months of 1954 . . . 

0,094 people wrote to WBZ-WBZA, including 15,000 
who requested a snowfall map offered in just six an- 
nouncements. 

8,830 wrote to WBZ-TV. And last year a sponsor got 
71,759 responses to one of its amateur shows. 

2,229 wrote to KYW . . . 2,024 of them for health booklets 
in just two weeks. 

8,122 wrote to WPTZ. And during this time, in addition, 
one sponsor heard from 35,467 listeners to his show. 

5,723 wrote to WOWO. One week brought $2,320 in $5 
orders for a garden product. 



45, /49 wrote to KDKA. In six weeks, 8,816 of them from 
131 counties, 19 states and Canada sent quarters and 
boxtops for gladiolus bulb premium offer. 

39,610 wrote to KEX. A two-week Valentine Day contest 
drew 5,511 entrants. 

You see. People don't just tune to the v^BC stations. 
They do something about what they hear. That's 
Audience Action! If you want to hear more, call your 
nearest WBC station or Eldon Campbell, WBC National 
Sales Manager, at Plaza 1-2700, New York. Ask about 
substantial multiple station discounts on the Audience 
Action stations, too. 



• ESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 





in die morning! 




in tlir afternoon! 




in (he evening! 



JL\ 

Winston-Salem 

VOIITII CAROLINA 

... the hub of a rich, fast- 
growing 15 county market in 
the industrial heart of the . . . 




State in the South 

Whatever your product or serv- 
ice — you will sell more of it 
faster to more people when you 
use the 




STATION 

Hit 



AFFILIATE 

600 KC-5 KW 
AM • FM 




Represented by 

HEADLEY-REED CO. 




[Continued from page L0) 

Next— put this device up front in your cop) (which is 
probabl) a minute's length or more). Then in the body test 
superimpose the phrase at least once. Then at your sign-off, 

reiterate. 

You are now assured of "playback" for your major point. 
Start practicing taking bows. You're in. Your copj sings 

it is "proven" effect i\e. 

Now there arc a few more tricks to master. Have you sec- 
ondary copy idea- to register, too, like "it is also beautiful" 
o] "movie stars use it" or "there's a ne\* low price." Ch< 
ironi the-e re-earch— tire techniques. 

It your- i- a food product, someone has to be -ecu i in t\ ) 
eating it and grinning! This says "Yum- Yum" which would 
not be apparent to our public no matter what the word- are 
like. People don't seem to understand thai food is edible 
until the act unfold- before their eyes. Hut don't forget that 
-mile! 

Is your pitch to be done 1>\ Mrs. Average Housewife? 
Then avoid having her wear a mink stole in the kitchen. He- 
search tells u> this i- atypical. Also— —she should not have a 
British accent. You see most American- don't. Her choice of 
words should be reminiscent of the V Y. Daily News— not 
The Harvard Law Revieu . 

More precept-: Don't have main changes of scene <>i set 
maybe jusl two — because you leave the viewer di//\ and 
dizziness i- not a conducive condition to sales. 

Voice-ovei isn'l good— —except when used correctly. (A 
learned man once told me this!) 

Well — these are a lew world-heating principles. There 
are more but let's not try to digest too many in the first les- 
son. Start u-iiiii them today — and you'll find they may not 
onl\ rate high on the Research ("hart but b'gosh von may 
even turn out real good commercials! * * * 



Letters to Bob Foreman are weleomed 

Do u>/( always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
tses in " Igency Ad Libs*'? Bob and the editors of SPON- 
SOR would be happy to receive and print comments from 
readers. Address Bob Foreman, c o sponsor, in E. 49 St. 



60 



SPONSOR 




What can you do 
with $73.58? 



o 



o 



For $73, you have lots of choices. You might buy a case 
of good Bottled-in-Bond Bourbon. Or a genuine, 
woven-under-water Panama hat. Or maybe treat 
150 neighborhood kids to a spree at their 
favonite soda fountain! 



>N WOAY, $73.58 will buy 13 one-minute spots! 



- 






WOAY, Oak Hill, is West Virginia's second most 
powerful station! 

Its 1 0,000-watt signal covers 21 counties — 

delivers a total Nielsen audience of 102,200 radio 
homes — 

delivers an average daily Nielsen audience of 5 1 ,320 
radio homes! 

rite direct for availabilities. 



WOAY 

OAK HILL, WEST VIRGINIA 

Robert R. Thomas, Jr., Manager 
10,000 Watts AM-20,000 Watts FM 





WEST VIRGINIA STATION 


COVERAGE 


DETAIL 




Radio 
Homes 
in Area 


NCS Area 


No. of 
Coun- 
ties 


DAYTIME 


4-Week Cum. Weekly 


Average 


' Day 


NCS Circ. 


% * 


NCS Cirt. 


%* 


NCS Circ. 


%* 


20,370 


FAYETTE 


1 


18,490 


90 


18,220 


89 


10,150 


49 


18,190 


GREENBRIER 


3 


15,490 


85 


15,130 


83 


6,720 


36 


66,940 


KANAWHA 


1 


10,310 


15 


7,180 


10 


4,410 


06 


14,570 


LEWIS 


4 


3,110 


21 


2,280 


15 


1,680 


11 


18,260 


LOGAN 


1 


2,780 


15 


1,960 


10 


1.020 


05 


19,440 


MERCER 


1 


8,000 


41 


6,480 


33 


3,990 


20 


14,290 


NICHOLAS 


3 


11,450 


80 


11,080 


77 


6,620 


46 


23,930 


RALEIGH 


1 


20,220 


84 


19,610 


81 


8,540 


35 


12,290 


ROANE 


4 


2,720 


22 


1,990 


16 


1,460 


11 


16,750 


WYOMING 


2 


9,630 


57 


8,610 


51 


6,730 


40 


225,030 


10 TOTAL 


21 


102,200 




92,540 




51,320 





* — % of Radio Homes in Area 



KITCHENS 



.puN-Hi; 



\(.l M 'l !>, 



--. i I quipmi <i> ' 

. \!'-i l I i AS! HIST0R1 I Hartford tin,, specializ- 

\nd remodeled kitchens /<</> '/ bit skeptical 

about /in/in <;n a source ft leads. The product •"-' often 

ran into u>ui figures urn/ presentation was technically 

At. On the advict of the local station a test vehicle 

was selected: a program <>l ^<><><l. classical musu heard 

mi Sunday afternoons. This liad adult <ii>i>r<il and would 

//c heard by men as well as women. The commercials 

in be unobtrusive and included the "/<- 

pearance oj tin firm's president n- kitchen consultant. 

Result: s /intt produced many choice leads and sales. 



w i > i ; < ii 



I'Knt.li \M Music ..I Distinction 



RECORDS 



W WIN, St Paul-Minneapolis 



PROGRAM: Judy's Jukebox 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR Homei I . Thompson 



M.I \i 'l It, 



< U '^' " < ^SE HISTORY When Homer Thompson 

picked up L3 neu L953 Fords recently, he bought two 
announcements daily on MutuaFs Major League Game 
of the Da) over KD/i. [This is a network co-op shou 
which is sold locally.) Game of the Da) was the only 
advertising he bought. Furthermore. Thompson was not 
offering discounts u* large as those given in nearby Los 
tngeles h>r the identical model. ) <t in two weeks' time 
nil 1 3 cars were sold. ( ost: 1100. 



KDB, Sanl 



PROGR \M: Gam oi the Da) 




SPONSOR: Anderson's Record and Gifl Shop AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSUL1 CAS! HISTORY: When Bob Anderson, own- 
■ i gift shop at the Huh Shopping Center in Minneap- 
olis, tool his lust fling ut radio he was faced with this 
"heliei e-it-or-not" proof of radio's sales ability. Anderson 
had decided to try out radio via participations in Judy's. 
Jukebox, heiml Monday through Friday between 4:00 
""'/ ">:'»<) over // l//\. One day 'soon after his entrance 
into radio) u man came into his store and said, "I was 
sitting in m\ ear mer there and heard your commercial. 
I didn't know you had records for sale.'' The man then 
proceeded to buy five alliums. 



TABLES 



-l'i >NSOR: Blackstont < orp. 



AGENl 'i : Direct 



I APSULE < ASE HISTORY: To announce the close-out 
sale of its subsidiary, the Elite Furniture Co., this James- 
loiiri fir m decided on a special campaign of announce- 
ments and participations oier a six-Weeh period. Id Man- 
famet I . /'iters selected radio "primarily to get 
penetration in an area encompassed in a 50-mUe radius 
from all sides of J dmestou n.'' The results justified the 
expenditure (>2 to ] : The tables sold brought in more 
than s(>2 of sales revenue for every $1 spent on radio 
advertising. Peters adds: "Practically all the purchases 
outside o) lamest, ,u n u ere attracted by radio." 



\\\\\. Jamestown, Y Y. 



I'KOi.K \\| : Announcements 



BANK 



SPONSOR: II,. Northern Trust Co, AGENCY: Waldie & Briggs 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Northern Trust Com- 
p,.n\ of Chicago had been using radio for 23 consecutive 
\cn/s a-, a goodwill builder. In that time the company 
liad increased tenfold. In January of this year, the for- 
mat of tlieir program was changed. The show and com- 
mercials were revamped to cause people to listen more 
attentively — stereophonic sound was introduced with dra- 
matic readings given by top actors and actresses. Wil- 
liam II. Rentschler, Northern's ad manager, says: "The 
results have amazed us. We like the future of radio." 



\\ M M,>. Chicago 



PROGRAM: The Northerners 



REAL ESTATE 



SPONSOR: Carl Moore 



AGENCY: Advance Advertising 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Carl Moore, a buUder, had 
55 new $9,000 homes to sell in Clovis. Cal. Clovis is lo- 
cated 15 miles outside of Fresno. In order to reach as 
many potential buyers as possible in a limited time, 
Moore decided to schedule 50 one-minute spots over 
KBIF within a six-day period. He also bought eight one- 
minute announcements over KBID-Tl which he scat- 
tered throughout Thursday. Friday and Saturday. By 
the end of the week only one house remained: 54 were 
sold. The total gross for Moore was $486,000. His ad- 
vertising expenditure teas only $336. 



KBIF, Fresni 



PKOtiRAM : Announcen 



BAKERY 



SPONSOR: <• I, o Bak< n 



AGENCY : Hired 



< \P-I II ( ASE HISTORY: When the Goodco Bakery 
decided to test radio's ability to sell baked goods, the?' 
bought two 50-word announcements a day scheduled be- 
ta een 1 :25 and 1 :30 in the afternoon. The test was called 
"Operation Sugar Cookie" as cookies selling for 30c a 
dozen acre advertised over WKNE at 10c a dozen for the 
test. The result was an unqualified success for radio: By 
11 ed nesilay of the test week the normal sale of 13 dozen 
cookies a neck liad jumped to 54 dozen. 



WKNE, Keene, N. 11. 



PROCK \\l: AnnouncemenU 



JUMPS THE CLOCK 




SCAST 

• •lands 
steady 
sponsor 



btation WEPM is a 250-watter at Martins- 
burg, nestled in the high hills of West Vir- 
ginia's eastern panhandle. It is within listening 
distance of nearby metropolitan centers. 

Even so, General Manager C. Leslie Gol- 
liday had been able to build an attractive 
and faithful local audience for his AP news- 
casts. Only one— the 15-minute spot at 8 
p.m.— failed to attract regular sponsorship. 
Prospects were quick to point out that the 
majority of Martinsburg listeners tuned in 



to a more powerful out-county station at 
that time. 

Golliday did some high-wattage thinking 
and arrived at this solution: He moved the 
program ahead 15 minutes, got the jump 
on the "foreign" competition, captured the 
local audience, sold the program. 

That was four years ago. The program is 
still sold. Sponsor is happy because Martins- 
burg folks listen to the early evening news 
BEFORE the "city station" gives it to them. 



If your station is not yet using Associated 
Press service, your AP Field Represen- 
tative can give you complete information. 
Or write— 




Says Manager Golliday: 

"By jumping the clock 15 
minutes, we were able to 
obtain — and hold — a 
steady sponsor. Listeners 
realize there's no more de- 
pendable news than AP 
news. Thanks to AP, we 
have news events in hand 
as quickly as even the big- 
gest station in the country." 




Those who know famous brands . . . 

know the most famous brand in news \sJt 



26 JULY 1954 



63 



<r 




* 




^ «» ' 





€&& 



? r>+*. 








STORER BROADCASTING C 



WSPD • WSPD-TV WJBK • WJBK-TV WAGA • WAGA-TY 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. 

KGBS • KGBS-TV WBRC • WBRC-TV WWYA WGBS 

San Antonio, Texas Birmingham, Ala. Wheeling, W. Va. Miami, Fla. 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 

TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. 

1 1 8 E. 57th St., New York 22, Eldorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 , Franklin 2-6498 





ii forum on question* «»i' current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



ffoir run u ItHttl or regional .sponsor use 
si/ncfi«*(tl<*(f film |»i»(/i(iiiiv fo Imvsi atlvttntttye 




THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

MERCHANDISING VITAL 

By If. If. Sillerman 

Executive ' ice President, Television 
Programs «»/ America 

Tin- first thing is 
to realize that 
h iili the purchase 
of the righl show . 
the selling job 
has jn-i begun. 

The advertiser 
should merchan- 
dise his sIionn to 
lli. hilt. He 
should use all the promotional and 
merchandising aids tin' syndii ator pro- 
\ nil'-. I- hi mil \ ai ion- progi ams we 
include material thai ranges from let- 
ters I • \ the star, through point-of-sale 
material, I" posters that sponsors can 
buj at lower i ost than the) can make 
them themselves. 

We .I" tin- to impress upon our cli- 
ents that the) arc buying not onl) top 
entertainment, hut sales builders. Ob- 
viously, the show i- the magnet which 
attracts tin- audience. I>\ getting be- 
hind the show, the sponsor adds impart 
i" extract even dollar of -ales value. 

Hi- agem j i an be of tremendous 
help in an \ number of ways, not the 
leasl of which is integrating the com- 
mercial into the content of each epi- 
sode. It i- our polic) to have prints 
in the hands ol the agencj or sponsor 
al leasl two weeks prior to plaj .1 ite 
t" allow ample time for the mosl ef- 
fr. tive |>io< easing of the i ommei ial. 
I he I'" al station is another sour< e 
oi real help, both in it- audience pro- 
mol i"N and mi n handising effoi t-. 

I he lo' il advei tiser w ho buj - the 
righl -bow from the righl source auto- 
matii all) a quires a ompetent, pi i 
sional team whose own success de- 




pends upon tin- advertisers success. 
He can gel the most out of his film 
b) using to the fullest the facilities and 
talents and services of the individual 
members of that team. 

CAREFUL PLANNING NEEDED 
By Fred /. MaKUtedl 

Director of Operations, CBS TV 

I Urn Sales 

\nv advertiser, 
local or national 
can use s\ ndicat- 
ill lilm programs 
effectivel) a n d 
successfull) b y 
simpl) using the 
same common 
sense. planning 
and attention that 
he wmild use in an\ other business 
transaction. 

Main local advertisers all across the 
country, in all types of markets, for all 
types of products, have used and are 
using film -hows on television with 
outstanding sales success. Others have 
had little or no success from the 
standpoint of sales effectiveness. 

The failures usuall) result from un- 
planned haphazard buying of programs 
and time periods, failure to promote 
oi merchandise the program and poor- 
K com eh ed or produced commercials. 
I he success "I a film program depends 
not onl) on the care with which the 
film i- selected but also on the \\a\ in 
which ii i- fitted into the over-all ad- 
vertising campaign. 

I ii-i o| all, the advertiser must have 
- leai K in mini jusl nn bat his market 
i- in term- of people. Who bin- the 
produi i .' Oi -< e 5 ou know exactly the 
audience you want, consult vNith the 
loi al station people as to the aN ail- 
abilit) of a time period in the hours 
nnIich your prospects are at home and 



not preoccupied v% i 1 1 1 other tasks which 
would prevent their watching televi- 
sion. 

In multiple-station market- gi\e 
some thought to what the program 
competition will be on the other station 
or stations in your time period. Uso 
make certain that \our program does 
not follow a \ctn low rated program. 

\fter you have settled on a satis- 
factory time period on a station cover- 
ing the area you want to reach, take 
plentN of time to look at the film pro- 
grams available of the type \ou re- 
quire. Do not let price be the out- 
standing factor in >our selection. The 
old adage that you onl) get as much as 
you pay for applies to svndicated film 
as n\cII as to anything else. The cheap- 
est film series may turn out to be the 
mosl expensive in the long run. More- 
over, do not be afraid of second-run 
programs. If a program is basically 
good it nnjII still draw large audiences 
the second time around. 

When you have decided on the par- 
ticular -eric- Nun want, do not just be 
satisfied to look at one or two audi- 
tion prints. Take the time to at least 
look at ever) third picture in the se- 
ries. Request a complete list of titles 
from the distributor and pick the ones 
that you want to screen from this list. 
Insist that you and not the distributor 
determine which titles you want to 
a reen. I lie top film distributors han- 
dling qualit) shows -will have no objec- 
tion to tin- procedure since the) are as 
anxious as you to see that the program 
pa) - "IT for \ ou. 

\\ ith the program and time -elected 
the next step i- the preparation of coin- 
men ial-. Here is one place where you 
cannol stint. In the long run. \our 
sales success NNitb the programs -lands 
oi tails on the qualit) or effectiveness 
of the commercials. No matter how 
large an audience your -Iionn ^et- it 



66 



SPONSOR 



will tuner sell anything if poor com- 
mercials with no sales impact are used. 

The lasl hut very important step still 
remaining is the promotion and mer- 
chandising of your show. Here you 
will prohahly he ahle to get some help 
and cooperation from the station, at 
least on the promotion end. The right 
kind of program promotion will help 
build larger audiences for your show 
and will also help get the series off to 
a faster start. 

Every possible merchandising aid 
should be used at the point of sale. The 
top film distributors have merchandis- 
ing specialists on their staffs who will 
be glad to cooperate with anv adver- 
tiser who wants merchandising. 

In addition, completely packaged 
merchandising material is available 
with most better quality programs. 

An example of an advertiser who 
followed all the suggestions outlined 
above, who carefully selected his pro- 
gram {The Range Rider) and time 
period, who prepared outstanding com- 
mercials that tied in the star of the 
show, and who followed up with an 
extensive merchandising campaign is 
the Table Talk Pie Co. through The 
Reingold Advertising Agency in Bos- 
ton. The results as reported to CBS 
TV Film Sales by the agency: "Sales 
increase of 607< in the first six months 
. . . viewers delivered at the low cost 
of $1.29 per 1.000." Today, with the 
series having run nearly three years 
the agency reports: "The client has 
continued to enjoy substantial sales 
gains ever since sponsoring the show 
and they are now building a new bak- 
ery to enlarge their capacity." 

PRESTIGE, PROFITS CITED 

By Edward D. Madden 

Vice President & General Manager. 
Motion Pictures for Television 

The question is 
not "How can lo- 
cal or regional 
advertisers syndi- 
cate programs to 
best advantage? ' 
but "Why do lo- 
cal or regional 
advertisers use 
syndicated film 

programs?" 

Prestige-wise, the syndicated film 

buyer is assured a place among the 
I Please turn to page 103) 





HtLL-y^^/ 



We ain't got no fifth amendment listeners in Central 
Ohio. They listen to WBNS and they'll tell any pollster 
who ealls up and asks 'em. When PULSE interrogates this 
area's listeners they get answers whieh add up: WBNS has 
more listeners than all other loeal stations combined; 
WBNS has the TOP 20 PLLSE-rated programs heard in 
Central Ohio. 



CBS for CENTRAL OHIO 




ASK 

JOHN BLAIR 



radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



26 JULY 1954 



67 



TO SELL 
JACKSONVILLE 

(and the rich Northeast 
Florida market . . .) 




WJHP-TV 

Channel 36 

§ § § 

53,374 UHF SETS-IN-USE 



ABC • NBC • DuMONT 

Television Networks 

! § 



For rates, availabilities, and oth- 
er information, call Jacksonville 
98-9751 or New York MU 7-5047. 

§ • 

WJHP-TV 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

276,000 watts 

on Channel 36 

led nationally !•> 

Julin II . Peri i I S50i ic 




agency profile 



Robert Orr 

President 
Robert Orr & Associates, New York 



When Robert Orr. president of Roberl Orr S Associates, gradu- 
ated from a Philadelphia high school man) years ago, a little old 
ladj who lived near him asked him: 

"How would you like to go into advertising?" 

The old lad\ > pull? H<t nine was secretar) to the president of 
a Philadelphia agenc) . 

It was a (lion i- between killing the summer at the beach before 
college opened or earning >l a week with an ad agency. Bob Orr 
decided right then on the career that has made him. today, head of 
an agency billing So* million a year. 

Heaviest of his agency's air media accounts i- Jergens-Woodbury, 
which spends some 4(t'i of its annual budget in t\. This cosmetics 
firm is currently sponsoring Bride ami Groom, NBC TV, 4:15-4.30 
p.m., three days a week over more than 60 stations. 

"Jergens-Woodburj has had proof of the growth and pull of (lav- 
lime t\ in its sales results during the past lw» years," Orr said. 

A year-'round air media sponsor, the firm has bought three-times 
weekly sponsorship of First Love, an NBC T\ daytimer starting fall. 

Other Orr accounts include such firms as Clairol Hair Preparations 
(soon to go on t\ i. Fuller Brush Co., Parfums Schiaparelli, Burling- 
ton Mills. Air Express l)i\. of Railway Express Agency and a do/en 
other di\ ersified accounts. 

"This agency doesn't specialize in only one type of product or 
service advertising," Orr said. Close to 7V, of his total >!! million 
billings, however, comes from cosmetics lines "i other strong women- 
appeal products. 

This \ear (he agency i- spending about $2 million, or 25* , id the 
total billings, in t\ expects to see a larger proportion go into air 

media b) 1955. 

"We've -ecu our Bride mid Groom show in color mcr NBC TVs 
facilities," Orr added, "and we found that the package reproduction 
in i. ui commercials was extremely effective. There will be few 

metic- firms who will be able to afford to -tax out of t\ once color 

t\ becomes a national medium." 

\\ Inn noi busy planning strategy foi hi- account- or supervising a 

-tail ol 85, Orr like- to break away for a weekend with his wife and 

12-year-old daughter at his Southampton home. • • * 



68 



SPONSOR 




EVERYONE AT WDAY-TV 

LOVES THE TAX ASSESSOR! 




WDAY-TV is the 

ONLY TV STATION 

WITHIN 50 MILES 

OF FARGO! 






Ordinarily you catch us billing and 
cooing with the Tax Assessor about as 
often as you see us playing around with 
a bunch of wildcats. . . . 

This year it's different. In May we 
asked the City Assessor if he could 
check Fargo's Personal Property Tax 
rolls and tell us the number of tele- 
vision sets in Fargo. Nobody lies to 
increase his taxes! And 65.5% of all 
Fargo families told the Assessor they 



own television sets! And remember, 
that was back in May, 1954 — less than 
a year after ice went on the air! 
We do a pretty fancy job in the rest of 
our coverage area, too. Twenty miles 
from Fargo the TV saturation is 52< 
fifty miles away it's 28% — and seventy 
miles away it's almost 20%! 
Ask Free & Peters for all the facts on 
WDAY-TV— the only TV station in the 
rich Red River Valley. 




WDAY-TV 

FARGO, N. D. • CHANNEL 6 

Affiliated with NBC • CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Represent„iii;-s 



i0 ; 



26 JULY 1954 



69 



A 



with 



WAVE 



you don't buy the elephant— 



YOU BUY THE TUSKS! 



WAVE and WAVE alone gives you exactly what you need 
in Kentucky — at the right cost. 

NOT TOO MUCH — NOT TOO LITTLE. 

WAVE's 50% BMB daytime area coincides almost exactly with the 
Louisville Trading Area, which accounts for 42.5°7c °f 
Kentucky's total Effective Buying Income. 

BIG-TIME PROGRAMMING — HIGH LISTENERSHIP. 
WAVE is the only NBC station in or near the Louisville Area. 
Plus that, WAVE invests in top local programming — employs 
62 people on radio only, 44 of them for on-the-air activities 
rather than management, sales, etc. 

Don't buy the elephant. Buy the tusks — but be sure you get 
ALL the tusks! NBC Spot Sales has the figures. 

WAVE 5000 WATTS 

LOUISVILLE * NBC AFFILIATE 

NBC Spot Sales, Exclusive National Representatives 



\*^/ lU"*, /^i -<^/ik//l\\ii/l'i ^/V^// WivM^iX 




I 




Nighttime 26 July 1954 

SUNDAY I MONDAY 



TV COM PARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 

TUESDAY I WEDNESDAY I THURSDAY 



Nighttime 26 



FRIDAY 



""To Copper, 
lelwork 5 GwoH 



^BmJJ^KJRttHtlK^KKMmKmK^M 






'"■^'"'V No n. 



8«Mt llB.MHf 



l'» l"«, halo 

hjrf d; 



i*«- T T? VtTi No n ""°" 

i 'i. ""'«'■'""■* 

CAW lis.000 



j S3CB IZQ.QQQ jj „„, 



Rod Skalton 
Inpl Godfrey'! 



Ini R J Hwrioldi ,, , vi „ Tvi Tod Tun** Dtor 



THSNY L' 



'% *" 



. C»P 113.300 







r Living 
Tlnaire 

T 






i tun Bud 

*-W *' * L 
ludllo M.S00 


NT * 


Th« Hunter 
ii i Doynoldi 

tin 

BONY If 

f-u 




B *B H780 


s. 


tiriailni 


No n*i*ork 
pro«ramln« 





Wa.000 Nua'i thi Stmt 



The Marriage* 



PljIMOth , I)l». 

■ c-_... Oiryiler Core 



86NY L 



'■« and explanations lo help you me (his chart Sponsor, listed alphabetical!,, irilh ...,.„,,, and time on atr 

"' 1*1(0! tnil produrllon only, do aM Include CMDBtnltll "' tlml rtttriM. Tiny Affllr. Chlrln, |i I s 1>TN. Mm >,• \i n t KH( 



I 1 " '-""T, ll.Tllal,! Tllllf. 

"V Llill ll.lllrnnr.: C!., Chlraao; II>, Hull) 

'■"I- OH.',. -.11 o* U,,*,' .l.l'l..r„ u-'l" ..' tl'.'.m I*. 



IU-..-1. NT, St* York; V«. 



| 



■ Kl'WI llv mi !■■ ■ 
r.l I.., I d '(ar.l)fl Lu tituuu r 



HtlKl. 1>U* (0 T-llY'l 



liu> ■tiTttiln* rrn<o i 



««>■ Am*. Too. SSi'll CUM. TlJ 'n. 7 (0 I" ,„„■ 

;■«*■ >(» «i< i " ■ - imm nhiM ,-ns, *„„' 

1^,,,' Armour 4 Co, rc.UI \ tt ,- ,n i , . 

•»ii- Buuk oiitr, ■llluua; ABO, Bu m* u on 



0BB, all T U 0:30 pro: 



Carle Prodi. 

Chun Kino, JWT QBB. .1! Tl, I0J 

Colg.lt.. t.u L-Bs M W K ii 30-13 noon 1 

-' '< ■' . '". 'I^i . Md . s; 

Gongtltum. M<-L'enn-Rrltkion: NBC. Tv 10:80-, 1 p 
Contlnnnlal Bkg.. Baiei NBC, W B;3ii-« pm 
Convwkd HI.... I ., I ■...,,. . , - CBl I 10 IS ii I 
Cutlahy Puking, via Mic, s.i 10-10:90 u 
Hiiik Qurtli, t ..... l„ Mif Tii B 10-10 pm 



. JWT MIC, Tli I 



General Food., Y.VB CBS, P B 

■ 'lis, !■■ n k :■ ,; m !i :m- 

General Mill*, 11 !'■«, Kii'.i -Hi; i :iti. ' 



rlgldalra. ITHII 



. Ludgip: CBS, Sun 10 30-1 



i bimuii, m.c-e. ens. 

I Dairy frodi., Ayer' C 



I, Warwick A Lokler: CDS, W 10 pm b 
Am Alnnmyi, JWT NTIC, til Bun 8-8 






SmlUi. CBS, all Sun « 



RCA. JWT- NBC : 






Sylvanla, Cecil A Prilbnj: CBS. Kal 1:30-1 i 



U.S. SUal. BBOO. ABC. 
Vllsmln Carp., KFCiC: D 1 



the ONLY station that gives you 



1,083,900* TV HOMES 
for the cost of only 399,400*! 




VHF-Channel 9 Jw^^<£ 





sioy«* 



CANTON 



No other stoilon gives you o TV buy like this! Powerful 
WSTV-TV offers you roles based only on the 399,400 
TV homes in the Steubenville-Wheeimg market - 52nd 
largest in the country. But you get a bonus of the 9th 
largest market — 684,500 additional homes — because 
WSTV-TV beams a clear, primary signal right into 
Pittsburgh! Right into Canton, Youngstown and many 
other industrial cities in the area, too! 



WSTV-TV'S 
coverage of 
1,083,900 
homes is 



BIGGER than SAN FRANCISCO 

(812,150 home.) 

.BIGGER thin WASHINGTON 

(580,000 homo) 



: CBS Hen 



MV STEUBENVIUE-WHEELING 




NOW! 
FULL POWER 

(230.500 Wall.) 
from our 

881 ft. 

MOUNTAIN-TOP 

TOWER 

(2,041 ft. 



ANOTHER AVERY KNODEL REPRESENTED STATION 



m 

PULSE FOR DEPENDABILITY 

Pulse-trained supervisors and staffs 
are in demand for special assignments. 
Typical of more than 170 firms they 
serve between regular Pulse surveys: 



PIT 



trmoui A' < o. 


\l. ( nun i i u kson 




lldei ton & Session* 


McGraxi Hill 


tmerican Home Foods 


\fonsanta 


Ulantit Refining Co 






yational hmn its 


B.B.D.&0. 


National Biscuit < o. 


Benton & Bowles 


Owens-Illinois 


Leo Burnett 


Robert U .On 


Biou t ompan r 


Opinion Researt h Corp 


CampbeU-Mithun 


Paris & Peart 


( amotion ' o, 


UfredPoliti 


Colgate-Palmolu e 


Pepsi-Cola 


CrossU) im 


Prudential Insurance 




Psychological Corp, 


Fact-Finders 




Foote, ('.tun- A Belding 


thiol. a Oats Compan \ 


Fuller & Smith & Ross 


Elmo Ropei 




RuthrauffSt Ryan 


Gallup X Robinson 




General Foods Corp. 


Safewaj Stores 


Gillette Razor Co. 


Scaltest 


C,r\ n . Sewell X Gangei 


U . R Simmons 




Daniel Starch 


Hotpoint !■ let i> ic 




Institute for Research 


Stewart, Dougall 


»n Muss Motivations 


Stilln im, Stauffei . 


International Research 


Colwell & Bayles 


tssociates 


Sv itt x Compan v 


Kenyon&Eckhardt 


1 U altCI Thompson 


Knox, Reet es 


1 ■•in i ompan \ 


Kio^n Company 






H ildroot Compan \ 


1 ei ei Huts. 


) oung X Rubicam 





This month throughout the U.S., 117,000 homes are 
being interviewed for next month's "U.S. Pulse TV" 




pt*t*H 

IHTMltWS 

imCte 

HOMi 



mts%± 

P 

^| AND URBAN COVERAGE 



B,vl,m, A July 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGkAMS 

TUESDAY I WEDNESDAY I THURSDAY 



Daytime 2b July 1 y !, 4 

FRIDAY I SATURDAY 






Erty 1B0M 



n«Ti 


1. M..,Vt 




t,, unfKMi 


Lbki 


1* III. 

tfl-.c-n 





m-f (••• man) 
E.tt 




LB ■■■■ lVi.i.1' 


'raWnmlM 


jjfis •-§ 




"HI'sli 



L» 


£ 


:;,,':• 


*"ft 


\„ 


•■::„ 


"*" ,'.» 


LloM 


YAR 


;. 


""■ 


r.m'f. 


1 













\v 




(IM 


« lul 








15*00 



Oirry Mow« 

DCMj II V: 

IWT I .,.,.. ,, 



SI'lk* It ftlth 



"XS" 






NT L*r 



n"htrr Q L«wl< 






No nttmxk 



LB Hhr unnn 

Rlt »■«..» 



Bffi£3? 
,nfi Z,„ ■ 


lb Uhr 


HDOi 


Sg ,n ' 


•SIS 



PULSE, /„ 



Telephone 



est Kill, St., Veu 
Judaon i 



I ..( ,y, 






NLtB JJ0OO 



I^VV 'm V't, 



lully I. 



noV.«* "" "£ 



. .> wm.i... H '" '"" '' """ 



UNI I 



ofs in ..on 



N.. n.iwoife f.., 



re: 



Pinky Li 
Ptrtlei n-.> f.i. 



Btnlop 4 Bi*lt i 



>., * h " t i. °*:™:r 

6oit>n * B*»l» 






J. 



...like WCAU-TV \> -tops in Philadelphia! 





WCAU-TV is now transmitting to the booming Philadelphia area 
from its new maximum-height, maximum-power SKY TOWER— 1000 feet 
tall with 316,000 watts! Reaching out into a 35-county, 4-state area, 
WCAU-TV is now the only Philadelphia station operating with both 
maximum height and maximum power. With the tenfold increase in 
power doubling its coverage area— WCAU-TV now reaches over 6,360,000 
people— 2,000,000 more than before! 

Ten big markets are available to buyers from this one station: 
Philadelphia, Chester, Allentown, Bethlehem, Levittown, Reading, Camden, 
Trenton, Atlantic City and Wilmington— an unparalleled opportunity 
for advertisers. 

Even before construction of the SKY TOWER, WCAU-TV enjoyed an 
unchallenged position in Philadelphia. Now— WCAU-TV reaches 45% 
more people than before— twice as many square miles— 10 major markets! 

Look at the breakdown: 

Coverage 35 counties 

Population covered 6,360,178 

Total families covered 2,292,300 

Total retail sales $8,935,730,000 

Total effective buying income . $13,418,528,000 

_ WCAU-TV 

•))L£VirreuA/ ^>\ blanketing America's greatest 

industrial expansion area 

•cmd£n 



m A 



THE PHILADELPHIA BULLETIN STATION 

26 JULY 1954 



CBS AFFILIATE • REPRESENTED BY CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 

77 



ARE YOU AFRAID? 
I 'i nun! from 

those who thoughl i e highlj ol the 

in;. Ini ;b. sponsor does not l<-c| this 
| e will Bettle the argument. It is 
too deep .1 < ontrovers) to be disposed 
isily. Bui this article should 
help • leai the ah and gel more admen 
thinking about the problem: W by do 
bo manj advertisers boycotl the air 
media ' I 01 Bome «>f the astounding 
reasons, see "W hv these •'>' advertisers 
|x iv I ii-.' .hi media," sponsor, 16 
Novembei 1953.) 

Five icho disagreed: The five who 
disagreed with Dr. Di< htei and spon- 
sor 1 ai-< <! these objections: 

1. I In- samples were too small and 
tin- conclusions were therefore statisti- 
cal!) invalid. 

J. Quantitative interpretations were 
pla< ed on crualitati\ e research. 

I In- impli< ation was made thai 
media buying aids like cost-per-1,000 
figures and others should I"- discarded. 

I rhere 1- jusl as mucb disagree- 
ment anion- psychologists land psy- 
chiatrists) as among admen, so who 
can be believed ? 



SELL THE 



GolDenllarhef 



0710 AMERICA'S 
NEGRO POPULATION 



WDIA- 
50,000 WATTS 




Here is a new "golden market" 
of 1,466,618 negroes! 37% of the 
total area population . . . one- 
tenth of the entire ne^ro popula- 
tion of An i' rica! And it can t be 
reached except with WDIA, the 
first and only 50,000 watt station 
to broadcast exclusively to the 
rich negro market. 

TOP HOOPER AND 

PULSE RATED STATION 

IN THE MEMPHIS MARKET! 



WDIA 



—MEMPHIS, TENN. 



REPRESENTED BY 

JOHN E. PEARSON CO., 

OORA-CLAYTON AGENCY. SOUTHEAST 



5. I's\cholog\ lia- it- place, hut too 
much reliance on it ma) In- as bad as 
qoI enough. 

The views of the various executives 

follow : 

\ .|». at a "top 10" agency: "] was 

verj mucb disappointed in tin- great 
stress given the musings of Dr. Ernest 
Dichter in Part III of the 'Psychology 
of Media. The implication is much too 
mi Mm: that all we have to do is throw 
aua\ our circulation, audience and 
cost-per-1,000 concepts and hire Dr. 
Dichter instead to studv the 'person- 
ality (inferences of various media. 

"I am sure Dr. Dichter would like 
this, hut if you had worked as serious- 
ly in the field of psychological research 
as many of us have, I believe you 
would be a little less sanguine about 
the utility of the results. Dr. Dichter 
is completer) overboard on his implied 
claims. 

"I may still lean heavily on num- 
bers, either because I have not yet been 
offered a compelling alternative, or be- 
cause I am, as Dr. Dichter sa\s. "in- 
secure/ Hut having worked long and 
bard, and systematically, in the field 
of media evaluation and recognizing 
full) some fairlv stupendous problems 
as yet unsolved, I believe I have 
enough security to find little solace in 
nursing at the breast of Mother Dich- 
ter." 

it if t Mini R. Baker Jr., chairman of 
the board, Benton & Bowles, New 
York: "Both sponsor and Dr. Dichter 
overlook an important fact in modern 
advertising practice. Today's success- 
ful advertiser and his agent have out- 
grow n "decision by whim and caprice' 
. . . and learned to dilute even sub- 
conscious domination b\ an) one per- 
son. Decisions are usuallv made these 
days b) groups, not by individuals. 

"Admitted!) all individual- have dif- 
ferent backgrounds, different likes and 
dislikes and are subject to some bias. 
Bui advertising derision-, and media 
decisions especially, are now the re- 
sult of a media group working with 
an account group. These groups are 
so diverse in their backgrounds and 
experiences that there is little chance 
for iinli\ idual bias to control their 
il<-. isions. 

"Noi < an we "-tick to what we know 
best' since we, like most, are a well- 
balanced mixture of main experiences 
ami backgrounds. \ml because our 



recommendations and the advertisers' 
decisions have become group decisions 
and corporate responsibilities, there is 
reall) no "job Becurity 1 at stake for the 
individual- of the group insofar as the 
selection of media is concerned. 

"SFONSOB says that "harder-to-use 
media like radio and tv are penalized' 
. . . apparently by some earlier trau- 
matic experience of individuals in the 
agenc) business. SPONSOR should look 
at its own records ol expenditures by 
media types. It will <|uicklv see how 
many healthy, non-neurotic, normal 
agencies and advertisers there are." 

Warner S. Shelly, president, N. W. 
Iyer & Son. Philadelphia: "Your ar- 
ticle lives up to its billing as 'one of 
the most controversial we have ever 
published.' I have a clear picture of 
SPONSOR'S staff rubbing their hands in 
glee arid telling each other: This will 
get under their skins. 

"I hope you won't be disappointed 
if I do not bourne from mv corner 
crying for vour blood or Dr. Dichter 's. 
Controvers) of this type is good for 
advertising. Anything that makes us 
look sharplv at our work and study 
ways of improving it. is fine. 

"It is quite possible, in advertising 
work, to follow a trend too far. Only 
recently, the trend was to advertising 
research of a mathematical nature. 
This sort of research was hailed as the 
answer to a great many advertising 
problems. Your article about Dr. 
Dichter's work strips some of the 
glamor from mathematical research 
and reminds u- that we are dealing 
with real people rather than numbers 
in an equation. 

"However. advertising's current 

flirtation with modern psycholog) i- 
also a trend. Human psychology is a 
fascinating subject, but I am unwill- 
ing to concede that professional psy- 
chologists are the onlv one- qualified 
to Interpret it. Long before gestall 

psycholog) was named, countless men 
and women proved their abilitv to 
swa\ people's emotion- through the 

arts, literature, politics and in many 
other ways. II vour article is su 
ful in reminding us that above all else 
advertising needs creative people — 

whether or not the) have ever read a 
book on psycholog) it will do a real 
-ci v ice." 

Hiirri/ .SY/iiiriricriiinn. president, 
llai tv Schneiderman, Inc.. Chicago: 



78 



SPONSOR 




i^jf 



/3L 








ID] 



v- 






BIG MIKE THE BIG SALESMAN! 



Big Mike gets around! . . . and he gets results! Car- 
tooned he appears regularly in the trade papers 
telling Nebraska's industry story. In the person of 
Thomson Holtz, he is seen and heard by thousands 
daily as he travels, from good job to good job in his 
little car. Big Mike is proud of the attention he is 
receiving from coast to coast . . . proud of the awards 
that have come his way. But more important, he's 
proud of the day-to-day story of results he is getting 
for his advertisers. KFAB-Big Mike is constantly 
building success stories. He likes to talk to people . . . 
and he would like to tell 'em about your product or 
service. When he tells 'em ... he sells 'em. That's 
what you'll find out when you pick up one of the 
current availabilities on KFAB. Talk it over with 
Free & Peters ... or lend an ear to General Manager 
Harry Burke. 

v v\\\ I \ I I / // / 







s 



Big Mike is the physical trademark of KFAB, 
Nebraska's most powerful station. 




■■ I be appeal. in. .- of the article <>n Dr. 
Dichter's view-, accompanied b) a pic- 
ture ol the most ominous Looking 
I rend 1 have ever seen, proves thai 
r ■ r 1 1 1 - baa come for mail order admen 
i tl v ;n it,, ii piece on this business of 
testing ads and buying media. 

- Ml liail to Dr. Di< liter for a bold 
i uposure of the m umbo- jumbo behind 
much advertising money. We mail or- 
dei admen traditionally look the other 
was when the statisticians, researchers 
and Burvey lads walk in. Our aloof- 
ness, however, i- motivated by reasons 
far different from those Dr. Dichter 
gives. It is -impK that mail order 
i. . bniques inherently possess the ca- 
pa< ities For finding the answers to all 
the problems which plague admen with 
plush clients. Since there seems to be 
i real need for impressive showings 
before big money is spent, the impor- 
tance of long columns of figures em- 
balmed between gold-stamped leather 
'"\ers is understandable. But, as Dr. 
Dichter -(. pointed!) explains, most of 
thern provide a convenient crutch to 
support shallow thinking. 

"To sim he. we mail order admen 
cannot relax on a soft bed of fancy 

HOOPER Tells the KC 




Story! 

Look at these figures 
une '54 HOOPER 
8:00 AM-12 N 

The picture has 

changed! 

Net A — 25.8 

Ind A — 16.0 

iNegrol 

KUDL — 13.4 

Net B — 10.8 

Net C — 9.8 

Ind B — 8.8 

Net D — 7.2 

Let your nearest FORJOE 
office show you the new 
June, '54, C. E. HOOPER 



SOON 



DENVER, TOO!! 




NOW rot THI »i«st TIUI 
HO«-l TOWN COvtlAGI (Ol 
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■IN THE GREAT KANSAS CITY MARKET 
^ ^ , I 



figures. Ever] penny we spend for our 
clients must produce a traceable profit. 
The *ke\ sheet' is our master. \\ e 
stand naked before the actual and 
tangible performance of every ad, 
ever] mailing, every tv and radio ef- 
fort. Ajid long ago mail order admen 
<le\ eloped techniques for testing ads 
and media which come closer to being 
scientific than any other techniques 
presently used. Perhaps that's why- 
mail order advertising looks so dif- 
ferent from all other forms of advertis- 
ing. Perhaps because mail order test- 
ing methods demand hard work, the 
research departments in general agen- 
cies avoid adapting them to their own 
testing. And these methods are ruth- 
less — many a pet inspiration goes in- 
to the wastebasket after mail order 
testing. Perhaps this is why most agen- 
cies are afraid to use them. 

''But I want to ask if Dr. Dichter's 
thesis that all will be well if admen 
begin to use the techniques of psy- 
chiatry may not replace one dogma 
with another. I do not mean to be- 
little the enormous contributions to 
human happiness made by psychiatry 
since Freud, nor do I mean to deny 
the value the use of all the social sci- 
ences may have for advertising and 
selling. The laudable work being done 
by Ed Weiss of Weiss & Geller is 
discovering a new world for mar- 
keteers. 

"I ask how valid and how scientific 
are those techniques? When psychia- 
try and psychoanalysis are mentioned, 
most of us immediately think of Freud, 
the grandfather of both. But how many 
of us know that the Freudian school 
is only one of many, that violent con- 
troversy rages constantly over funda- 
mental principles, that one school's in- 
terpretation of behavior and its causes 
is vigorously rejected by another 
school which brings forth its own the- 
ory ? We have not only Freud and his 
followers but also Adler. Jung. Meyer, 
Horney. the Non-Directives, the two 
Reiks. Fromm and Sullivan in addi- 
tion in the Gestaltists whom Dr. Dich- 
ter mentions. 

"We have bitter disputes over the 
causes behind motivations — instincts 
\-. environment, sex \s. the drive to- 
wards masculinity, determinism \s. 
free will and countless other debates. 
I he media buyer who looks beyond 
Freud and encounters this \ ast and 
fluid 'science' will either be lost in 
the wilderness or conclude that the 



techniques of ps\chiatrv are no more 
\alid than those he now employs. He 
will quickly discover that even the 
terminology u^-ed by each school is 
different. 

"The fact is that psychiatry is not 
yet a science but an art. Oddly all 
schools, however much they ma] dif- 
fer from and even contradict each oth- 
er, come up with many spectacular 
successes when they apply their theo- 
ries in practice. They also come up 
with devastating failures. The bodv of 
valid knowledge in the field is ap- 
pallingly meager. It appears that the 
personal talents of the therapist more 
than any other factors account for 
success or failure. The same theories 
applied by one therapist will cure a 
patient: in the hands of another thev 
may make him worse. I believe that 
the alluring new broom of psychiatry 
applied to advertising may result only 
in a new book, a new gimmick that 
will become attractive only because the 
old one is worn thin. 

"Yet, having said all this. 1 never- 
theless believe that an awareness and 
an intelligent use of the little now- 
known about human behavior can be 
of great value to all advertising. This 
knowledge can break a few dusty idols. 
It can lead to fresh and exhilarating 
adventuring. It can make advertising 
more interesting, more believable, 
more product ive. 

"But it seems to me that when all 
this is said, the big question — how to 
appraise accurately the value of a giv- 
en medium or ad — remains unan- 
swered. One day a bright researcher 
will discover that mail order testing 
techniques can be adapted to finding 
the answer, and then a truly depend- 
able way for testing media and copy 
will emerge." 

Henry Schachte. senior ;./>.. Bryan 

Houston. Inc.. \nr York: "This third 
article on the psychology of media i». 
I think, dangerous. 

"You are presenting quantitative in- 
terpretations of qualitative research. 
Relatively few agencymen were inter- 
\ iewed, and from this general and 
rather damning — conclusions were 
drawn. 

"' I he agency business— like business 
generally— is not a democracv . Ml 
\otes do not have equal weight. It is 
obviously wrong to give the same im- 
portance to opinions about media, re- 
gardless of their source. If the pur- 



80 



SPONSOR 




fit {& 
I 




& M 



\ 





WCCO Radio's emcee Bob DeHaven 
stands 6' 2" and weighs 240 pounds. 
Yet DeHaven is no Paul Bunyan. 

No comparison? 

Unless you compare 'em like this . . . 
Bunyan only worked a 12-hour day. 
DeHaven works from 7:15 a.m. to 
11 p.m., doing 23 programs a week all 
told. (Every one is first in its time 
period!) Bunyan could be heard 
several miles away when he shouted. 
DeHaven is heard at least once 
a week by more than a million differ- 
ent people in WCCO's 109-county 
primary area. Bunyan made quite 
an impression on everyone he met. 
DeHaven makes impressions on 
people he never even met — total- 
ling more than 6,000,000 listener 
impressions a week! (Between 
broadcasts, he does his best to meet 
them all, by making personal appear- 
ances throughout the Northwest.) 

Adds up to this. No one compares 
with Bob DeHaven when it comes to 
making a good impression for your 
product in the Northwest. He stands 
in a class by himself. 




Minneapolia-St. r«»/WCCO RADIO 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Stiles 



!„.-. o\ ■• out .hi i. le, .1- seema the < a« • 
i- i.. -Ii..u uli.ii reall) - ontrols media 
buying, you must find the people 
whose ip|iini"ii- .h lu.ilK decide media 
problems .mil inten iew them. 

- n. c the first p. ui oi tin- arti< le 
presumes i" outline problems ami the 
-i . ond part offei - solutions, perhaps 
then tin- set ond pari offers solutions 
to problems that • 1 • < t • i reall] exist. 

* ~ ^ ••iii general conclusion seems to 
be thai media hum i and cop) w i itei s, 

ti lon'l base their thinking mi what 

the product will <l" Eoi tli«' user. 

"I < ontend that the) do, ami have 

fm years, ami that it i- not a new 
idea |u-t he< au>e \ ou now call it 'emo- 
tional involvement.' 

" fhis idea is at least as old a- John 
Caples 1 first hook probabl) much 
older. 

"Some years ago Imn (ieoghegan 
umte a hook on media I for Young & 
Rubicam's interna] use), and the ver) 
first idea In- expressed was approxi- 
mately, -i I m working from mem- 

ory: 'The basic fait that controls all 
media selection is — how can we most 
forciblj bring the promise of the prod- 
uct to those most likely to buy?' 

"I think you do advertising a dis- 
service b) talking about the preoccu- 



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Chief KWJJ help you capture 
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of him powerful 
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National 

Representative 

BURN SMITH CO.. INC 




I Oil S.W. 6th Ave. 

PORTLAND 5, v 
OREGON 



lnd*p«nd#M 

Radio Sigiied 



pation oi agencj people with 'numbers 
coverage ratings 1 without first ad- 
mitting : 

"1. That, before an) media work is 
done, good advertising Btarts first with 
research to find the strongest, the 
broadest appeal justified b) the prod- 
uct that will turn potential users into 

actual u-ei-. 

'"2. That the media assignment i- to 
bring the strongest Btor) most effective. 
l) and least expensivel) to the market, 
whether it he the total present market 
or the heaw u-ers or the infrequent 
Users or the ne\ ei users. 

"A. That, after basic media deci- 
sions are made. BUch facts as dealer in- 
fluence are \alid considerations when 
regarded in proper perspective. 

'"I am not pretending that media 
buying i- perfect or unhiased. 

"Hut I certain!) will never agree that 
it's as dark as you make it. 

"If it were as unreasoned and ill- 
planned as you indicate, how could 
advertising have become the most efli- 
cient. most effective means yet devised 
to move goods, as it has? 

"So, please don't make media buv- 
iiiii sound so haphazard — because it 

IStl I. 

Dr. Divltter's answer: D r . Dichter, 
interviewed in his manorial offices atop 
Prickly Pear Hill overlooking the Hud- 
son River and the village of Croton. 
said the response to the article "really 
proves to me that we touched a vital 
point in the professional life of the 
respondents. "Apparently it was like 
telling a man you've just completed a 
study which showed that 95^5 of the 
times the wife makes the major deci- 
sions in the home. Of course hell 
deny this." 

\\ hen a person is suddenl) confront- 
ed with a statement that affects him 
personally, there are only two possible 
reactions -and the agencymen re- 
sponding have taken both, Dr. Dichter 
said. These are: 

1. To agree. In this case the major- 
it) did agree- with some qualifica- 
tions. 1 Quotes will follow later in the 
article. 1 

2. To "escape" or explain the find- 
ing- aua\ . 

*" I he Becure agencymen accept the 
findings; the insecure one- show the 
typical signs of escape," Dr. Dichter 

said, rhese are to re-pond as follow-: 

1. "'lour findings appl) to other-, 
hut not to me." 



2. "^our analysis is incorrect." 

3. "1 <-s. but—." 

"I am more likely to find offenders 
(agencymen who use crutches in me- 
dia buying) in that second or 'escap- 
ist group than in the other," Dr. Dich- 
tei -aid. "Our BUrve) showed that the 
insecure media buver — and I'm speak- 
ing of the decision-maker, not ju-t the 
print or timebuyer — was the most 
liked) io he using irrational techniques. 
The) an- tin- one- ulio showered us 
with success formulas and rigidlv 
worked «.ut schedules Bupposedl) based 
on their experience. The more the) 
tried to impress us and themselves with 
their rationality the more they re- 
vealed their irrationality. 

"The secure media buyer, we found, 
wa- one who freelv admitted the neces- 
-itv of flexibility, the need for reexam- 
ination and the relative unpredictabil- 
it\ of media decisions on a long-range 
basis. 

"Ever) good salesman knows that 
the man who argues most Btrongl) that 
he does everything systematically and 
onl) from rational motives is usually 
the true sucker. 

"So the media man who argues for 
cost-per- 1,000 and other similar con- 
cepts is afraid to throw away his 
crutches. 

"Yet quantitati\e research has its 
place in media evaluation, just as qual- 
itative research does. I never for one 
moment meant to impl) that you should 
not concern yourself with cost per 
reader or listener. It is one of the 
factors that has to be put into the total 
formula for media selection. But defi- 
nitely it is not an 'either/or' relation- 
ship. I Be psychological data and 
quantitative data. Don't sa\ use one 
or the other." 

As for the general denial that the 
influence of fear is widespread. Dr. 
Dichter said : 

"\\ hat most of the critics of our 
finding- seem to be saying is this: 
'How can Dr. Dichter say we are guid- 
ed b) fear and irrational motives when 
we know ver\ well we are rational in- 
dividuals? 1 This simpl) flies in the 
face of basic accepted psychological 
facts, lor example: \ person keeps 
forgetting something. ^ <>u ask him 
wh) and he'll usually tell you: "I'm 
just absent-minded." Yet the truth, 
once you probe a bit. inav be some- 
thing far deeper. I sually he forgets 
because he wants to forget What some 

■ Please turn to patie .">(> i 



82 



SPONSOR 






> 



\ 



\ 




YOU MIGHT RUN THE MITE IN 3 MINS., Jit SETS.*— 



Bl T... 



CONLAN RADIO REPORT 

METROPOLITAN GRAND RAPIDS 

NOVEMBER, 1953 





Morning 


Afternoon 


Night 


WJEF 


29.6% 


30.8% 


33.1% 


6 


26.3 


22.8 


28.6 


Others 


44.1 


46.4 


28.3 



YOU NEED WJEF RADIO 
TO BREAK RECORDS 
IN GRAND RAPIDS! 

WJEF serves 116,870 radio homes in the Metropolitan Grand 
Rapids Area. Conlan figures show that WJEF gets 9.6% more 
evening listeners than the next station. 25.29? more afternoon 
listeners and 12.6% more morning listeners. Yet WJEF' 
actually costs less than the next station, at any time — and 
is CBS, too! 

Let Avery-Knodel give you all the facts on WJEF — Grand 
Rapids' top radio buy. 







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WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

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KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 




CBS RADIO FOR GRAND RAPIDS AND KENT COUNTY 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 

John handy set this world's record in Finland, in June, 1954. 



Hay 11 > 



„ «, Mr. wn****" , ,. moving «** °^ the 32 

Ce ar W. -„terested in * n S lBe Buyers ^ ace d over 

recently f"***^** ^?j. 

J! agencies » bi uing i" "" + determine 

^>.°°°- ^ our qu estionna^ -f^tn and . 



Cor di*Uy J**" 




%jkM**~ 



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Why 

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SPONSOR is pinpointed to the work- 
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aid to the busy buyer from cover 
to cover. Any wonder it ranks first in 
this (or any other) objective study of 
radio / tv reading habits among 
national agencies and advertisers? 

P.S. A feic months back another broadcaster made an objective survey of ad manager, 
account executive and ti/mebuyer trade paper readership, sponsor was the #1 ch" 



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THE MAGAZINE RADIO AND TV ADVERTISERS USE 



Ol ill' l.i ':• If- .Hi- SB) fog i-. '\\ e (lull I 

mind oni bit hav ing oui advertising 
• i lip i/iil.' ^ el w iilnii fi\<- minutes 
the) are '>n ili<- defensive .in< I reje< 1 1 1 1 u.- 
the < i it i« ism. \'«- ause thej feel the) 

.11 i guided b) irrational lives, 

the) .nunc thai oui -i u> I \ revealing 
thai iii.iiin of ilicni are is wrong. \ 
simple example showing how mistaken 
this reasoning can I"- is the following: 
'" \-k someone to tell you about his 
las) three i ai a< < idents and the avei - 
person w ill dea i ibe them in such 
.i u.i\ a- to put all tin- blame on the 

i. lli- i Irlliiw . \\ hich man w ill readilv 
admit thai In- bought a cai Onl) I c- 

i an-.- Iii- w ili- liked the color? It's 
like someone saying repeated!) he's not 
jealous ami you lake hi- word fur it. 
1 1 I wenl to I in » agenc) men making 
isions ami asked them bluntl) whal 
the) based these decisions on. 1()() 
would ti-ll me: 'Sound research ami 
thorough analysis ol tin- appeals "I 
the product.' I -in- psychological 
techniques, we have discovered differ- 
entl) ." 

\\ hiii about ilii- - i iticism that "ad- 
vertising's ' urrent flirtation with mod- 
ern psycholog) i- also a trend?" 



Covet Cent™ 
Miuouti with 






>m 




Real ii iImv . t iiii.il Missouri mai 

kn with 186, 12 I radio Families' 

and a consumei income ol $698,- 

■ in .i 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 % county, 

foul i m . '_■ nn .in. i covered 

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900 KC • 1000 WATTS 



"It- like saying thai advertising's 
• on, nn uith people i- a passing trend. 
\ll we psy< biologists an- -a\ ing i-. ' \tl- 
vertising i- dealing with people. If 
you want to find out bo\t to reach ami 
move people, you have to find out what 
make- people tit k. It i- not a trend. 
It i- the filial discover) of the real 
i --tin c <i| advertising which mam 
genuine copywriters learned a long 
time ago. 

How aboul group decisions being 

more rational'.'' 

"Groups tan I..- guided irrational!) 

ton. I iii nut saying that everyone in 
advertising who is influenced b) fear is 
neurotic. This is a normal human re- 
a< tion. It i- moil- normal lor a per- 
-uii to want to protect himself than to 
stick his neck out. You can almost 
-a\ that the insecure person is the nor- 
mal one: the person who reallv does 
what In- wants to do and sticks his neck 
out has to he unconventional. 

"We're not talking about extremes. 
I realize it is important for a media 
man to make his media decisions on 
an unbiased basis without considera- 
tion for his job security. But that is 
an ideal ami is verj difficult to reach. 
Nobod) can afford the luxur\ of going 
conipletelv contrary, if not to his own 
ii rationalities, then to those of his 
collaborators, particularly bis clients. 
The Luxur) of integrity in the business 
world is a rarity. You can count on 
the fingers of one hand the agencies 
which resigned accounts this past year 
because the client absolutely refused to 
accept their recommendations. The 
agenc) which flies in the face of its 
clients' prejudices — irrationalities — 
will not long survive."' 

Can an irrational factor like fear ac- 
tually hurt radio and t\ ? 

"j* es, in two ways: 

"1. It perpetuates the media status 
quo. \ir media are newer, harder to 
use, intangible. The adman's fear 
make- him want to deal with the old. 
the easy and the tangible like news- 
papers ami magazines. 

"2. It perpetuates the program -ta- 
in- quo ami results in the imitative 
use ol radio ami television. Because 

■ •I the high COSl of failure, the adman 
often spends hi- time trying to cop) 
the formal "I a successful -Inm — or 
commercial instead of uncovering it- 
basic appeals and creating an entire.) 
new program w ith the same appeals." 



FULTON, MISSOURI ' i '' 1 " "'*• aureed: \ m ong agenc) 



executives who agreed with Dr. Dich- 
ter and SPONSOB in whole or in part 
wen- these eight who gave reasons oi 
Bome explanation of how media deci- 
sions were reached in their agencies: 

/'resident. S'JO mi/lion <i(;<>tici/: 
"I became aware, long a^o. that 1 1 1 > 

own attitudes to media are prejudiced 

b\ in\ own emotion-, conscious or un- 
con-i ious. For example, I suffer from 
oli-t ure emotional resistances to Sun- 
da) supplements, to all Hearst publica- 
tions, to billboards and to expensive 

l\ -how-. 

"I also suffei from obscure emotion- 
al attractions to The New Yorker, the 
\cn York Times and Life. 

"As soon as I became aware of 
these ii rational attitudes. I abdicated 
iii) presidential prerogative to influ- 
ence our agenc) - media plans. I trust 
that oui Media Department is relative- 
l\ rational in the formation of it- 
politic- ! 

Leo Burnett, president, Leo Burnett 
Co., Chicago: "\ am not silly enough 
to argue Ernie Dichter's point-. 

"\I\ own approach to advertising, 
including media, is very simple. It 
starts with an idea. If possible, it 
should be an idea that will cause peo- 
ple to talk over the back fence, which 
is the lowest cost, most effective kind 
of advertising. 

" \fter getting an idea which most 
closely approximates that high stand- 
ard, one is forced to look at the budget. 
The problem then becomes one of us- 
ing the available funds to put it in the 
places where it will multiply most 
rapidly. 

"Toward that end selection revolves 
around experience, common sense. 
facts, competitive forces, seasonal fac- 
tors, merchandising values and other 
things which are supposed to add up 
to good judgment. ' 

Fairfax Iff. Cone, president. Foote. 
Cone cv Belding, Chicago'. "1 don't 
think 1 have anv disagreement with 
Ii nest Dichter's findings on what 
sometimes influences people in buy- 
ing media. 

"I am assuming thai when Ernest 

-av- often, he means sometime-. \nd 

that when In- -a\- agencymen, he 
means advertising people generally. 

"This i- m) w av ol -av ing that I 
think vou mav have oversimplified. 

"To be -inc. there i- a great deal 
of tradition in the buying of media. 



86 



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I 



26 JULY 1954 



87 



I here are also fads and fan ies, 

"Bui ii mosl ii ■<-• I i;i men .u<- any- 
thing liki- cm own, the) are a prett) 
objo live crew, \ i ■ • { it the) don t moi e 
.1- rapidl) inn. nil new things .1- Bome 

vendor- lliilik the) -hould. il in.iv just 

be be< ause the) are a little bit like 
othei professional people h ho don i 
want to tak> chances n bethei this be 
wiili other people's rights oi lives . . . 
■ •I Fortunes. 

"Perhaps I am jn-i getting "l<l and 
-• 1. bul I ilimk the media people do a 
prett] good job. Vs items, I give you 
.mil hook and < oronet and tele- 
\ 1-1..11 ! \l-t. 1. iiln. from u lull adver- 
tisers in droves were diverting before 
the ageni \ people brought them back. 

Edward If. Welts, president, lleiss 
& Getter, Chicago: "The reluctance "I 
~< >iu. ■ advei tisers t" a< cepl the rela- 
tivelj novel idea ol using motivation 
resi an Ii .1- .1 pra< tical means of im- 
proi 1 r 1 ■_■ advertising w ill be overcome, 
we believe, as the realization spreads 
that most advertising activities, when 
reduced to essential-, can l>e defined 
in terms "f human feelings. 

'" I kit i- whj we have been alile to 
successfully apply our knowledge of 





W^°*rs% 



Radio Station W J P S if THE sports sta- 
tion in the Evansville, Indiana market. If 
you want to reach MEN, check our avail- 
abilities around our live play-by-play 
sports ... the year around. 

■*• LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 

• EVANSVILLE COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
■*• BIG TEN FOOTBALL 

• LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL 

• EVANSVILLE COLLEGE BASKETBALL 

• INDIANA UNIVERSITY BASKETBALL 

• INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL TOURNAMENT 
it NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

• EVANSVILLE BRAVES BASEBALL 

• 500 MILE INDIANAPOLIS SPEEDWAY RACE 

• OTHER SPORTING EVENTS AS THEY OCCUR 

Sports mean LISTENERS. Listeners mean 
RESULTS. Let us prove our worth to you. 



RelMfl J. Mclntoth, Gtnerol Manager 

iimisintid IT 

The Gtorgt P. Hollingbery Company 




'%3 



"A RADIO IN EVERY ROOM" 

Evansville, Indiana 



human motivations beyond advertis- 
ing cop) to activities once considered 
1. 11 gelj ni'-< hanical, bu< Ii as media : 
functional, Buch as packaging; -tati-- 
inal. -u< Ii as market analysis. We are 
even experimenting with tin* use 
motivation research in helping design 
new products and new packaging, be- 
■ ause the emotions and attitudes <>f 
human beings are the real root ol 

• .1. Ii ol these problems. 

"Such resi arch could 1 ei tainl) not 
achieve maximum usefulness were it 
conducted bj professional social sci- 
entists working alone with Little prac- 
tical knowledge of advertising. Neither 
could it be done li\ professional ad- 
vertising people untrained in the 
knowledge and use of motivation re- 
search. In our own agency we have 
learned to combine and fuse a real un- 
derstanding of both advertising and 
moli\ alinii research, thus creating a 
new technique in which the total is 
greater than the sum of the parts." 

(Recently Weiss & Geller's motiva- 
tion department made a 2,500-mile trip 
through 11 cities in five states and 
conducted 78 depth interviews with 
retailers. Weiss says: "Over and over 
again we found that pricing and -t\l- 
ing of a line were not nearly so im- 
portant to a retailer as his feelings 
toward the manufacturer's representa- 
tive who (ailed on him.") 

James .»!. Cecil, president. Cecil & 

Presbrey, New York: "I find Dr. Di< li- 
ter's article provocative and interest- 
in-. 1 think most old hands in ad- 
vertising will agree that an imagina- 
tive approach to media lun ing is high- 
Is productive and that inefficiency 
lurks in the adoption of a conventional 
and traditional approach. Media buy- 
ing can be creative and should be crea- 
tive. The more creative the approach 
the more productive the advertising, 
whether it i- media hi copy we are 
dealing with. 

■"While Dr. Dichter stresses the in- 
tangibles involved in media buying 
and spotlights the weaknesses of a 
timid approach, I am confident that 
he does not mean thai the media buy- 
ei should throw awa) the old yard- 
sti< k- of |ih\-H al evaluation. I take it 
that he recommend- broadening the 
buyer's perspective b) encouraging 
him lo disregard |iln-i(al measure- 
ments oi Space buying when the |i-\- 

chological factors in the situation en- 

• ourage departure from tradition.'" 



Stephens Dietz. , . f ,.. Hen at. Ogilvy, 

Hen sun X- Milliter, \eu York: "The 

value of this article is its highlighting 
of the need lor men who have a total 
approach to the problem of an account 
rathei than specialists. 

"This, I Bubmit, i-= a- much a prob- 
lem in an agent j organization as it i- 

in media evaluation. It i- the problem 
■ •I ageni v organization to bring to bear 
nn the problems of a client the brain 
power of each individual group of spe- 
cialists within the agency in such a 
vvav that the specialists see the whole 

i<>li and Btudj how best thej can help 
to accomplish the whole job. 

"In too man) agencies it is the prac- 
tice for the job to be divided into 
-mall pieces without letting the special- 
i-l- <ee the whole job and without let- 
ting them combine their talents and 
ideas with those of specialists in other 
departments in arriving at a recom- 
mendation." 

II « r ion Hurpvr Jr.. president, Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, New York: "I found 
your last piece 1 Part III of 'Psvchol- 
ogj of Media' 1 most fascinating, prob- 
ahlv for the -ame reason that anv pa- 
tient is interested by a clinical diag- 
nosis of his own behavior. It- eas) 
for us in advertising to become pre- 
occupied with consumer motivation- to 
the point of neglecting our own. Di< li- 
ter's observations are extremely pene- 
trating, though they're put in the form 
ol generalizations which a lot of peo- 
ple won't -wallow as applicable for 
their own particular case. 

'"There are certainly many fortui- 
tous and accidental factors which 
shape advertising derisions apart from 
the rulebook, and even part from un- 
conscious motivations like fear or in- 
-( 1 in itv . To the extent that we r» 

ni/e the existence of these non-rational 
influences on our own thinking. I think 
il becomes more nearly possible for 
us t" select media objectively and 
w iselj ." 

I. I.'. Cole, president, ('ale and Web- 
er. Portland. Ore.: "In my opinion this 
i- one of the best 1 of the media arti- 
( le- 1 . even though it will leave room 
for differences of opinion and argu- 
ments. 

"There i- much thought-provoking 

material here and if we want to he 

honest with ourselves- considerable 
truth." * * * 



SPONSOR 



A 

realistic 



a 



tpproach 

to radio 



advertising 

Let's be realistic — you, as a time buyer or advertiser, have a perfect 
right to question the selling power of radio in any market. Let's be 
equally realistic about proof of selling power of any medium. Posi- 
tive proof is difficult to obtain. Too often variables outside the ad- 
vertising structure affect the sale of the advertised product. 

We believe, however, that at WSM we have an indication of the 
effectiveness of WSM radio that pinpoints selling results in an unusual 
way. 

WSM is not a mail-order specialty station. There are few mail order 
accounts which can meet our specifications. However, we. know that 
in the mail order field, as in no other, sales results are quickly and 
directly measured. 

Thus our interest in the latest figures from Noble-Dury & Associates, 
advertising agency for the Carter Chickery of Eldorado, Illinois. For 
nineteen consecutive years Carter Chickery has been a successful WSM 
advertiser with a live Saturday night program featuring Grand Ole 
Opry talent. Has radio paid off in direct sales in 1954? "Using no 
advertising but our WSM program Mr. Carter has sold over two 
million baby chicks priced as high as $43.9") per hundred this season," 
reports Noble-Dury. "This is the second biggest year in Mr. Carter's 
history, exceeded only by 1943." 

Being realistic — radio continues to be the great mass selling medium 
in this Southern market. 

And vvSjSiY, as always, ranks 

NASHVILLE t CLEAR CHANNEL* 5 0.0 00 WATTS 

26 JULY 1954 89 



# 




ROTISSERIES ON AIR 
i ( ontinued ti<>m pa ■ I i 

I \ . 2:00-2:30 p.m. w ross-the-board; 
Susan Adams Kitchen Fare, WABD, 
Wednesdays and Fridays, 1 1 :30-12:00 
noon; news* asts bj Vrthur \ an Hoi ti, 
\\ \i;t l\. I I :00-l I :10 p.m., a< ross- 
die-board; The Ted Steele Show, 
\\ PI \. I uesdays, W ednesdays and 
I ii.l , - I i5 »:00 p.m. 

Steinbook told sponsoh thai Broil- 
(jink sales in 195 1 were better than 
double the L952 gross, thai i- v l<» mil- 

I in 1953, despite increased < om- 

petition. Broil-Quik's distribution pat- 
tern furthei reflei i- the growth of the 
firm. In L95 1 Peerless Ele< trie sold 
its Broil-Quik mainl) in eight majoi 
cities. Bj spring L954 distribution bad 

enlarged to ei pass over 10 majoi 

and secondary markets. 

\i this time Broil-Quik fell thai it 
was read} foi a more national adver- 
tising effort. In \|n N Hicks & • Jreisl 
was appointed as its new agencj . 

"Now the time bas i ome foi network 
tv," Max Steinbook told sponsor. 

In spring 1954 Broil-Quik (through 
1 1 M k- & ( Jreisl i decided to buj into 
NBC TVs Home, with \rlene Francis 
to sell tin- broilers. Originally, Broil- 






MEMO TO MEDIA 
BUYERS: 

Vi'RBL Radio and WRBL-TV 
art' the ONLY media in 
Columbus with "AREA IM- 
PACT"! 

The only means of delivering 
your clients' messages to 92' r 
of ALL homes by radio and 
to 50 ( "( of ALL homes by tele- 
vision . . . and, at lowest cost- 
per-thousand. 

WRBL AREA is IMPOR- 
TANT in the Southeast! 

Population 6*6,000 

Families 150,000 

Radio Homes I 58,000 

Car Radios 82,000 

TV Homes 74,000 

Retail Sales (000) $360,500 

E.B. Income (000) #670,000 





f MV/0 



COL UMBOS', GEO WG/A 



CALL -HOLL/N&3E72Y 



Quik was -' beduled to go on Home 
earl) in Bpring, bul the Vrmy-Mc- 
i .ii ili\ hearings delayed the firm's 
network t\ debut. \- June rolled 
around, l'i k Scanlon, Broil-Quik a/e, 
began to worry about the drop in 
Home viewers because "I the Senate 
bearings and network plans were post- 
poned until I. ill. Broil-Quik will be 
on the Home show once a week for 
eight weeks starting 16 September. 

Peerless Electric plan- t<> spend 
about 12.3 million in 1954 advertising. 
Most ul the increased budget is sched- 
uled for spot t\ program buys in 20 
markets with emphasis on New ^ ork. 
In New ^ ork Peerless Electric has add- 
ed a half-hour film show on \\ \BI) 
to it- lineup: Life with Elizabeth, Mon- 
days and Fridays, 8:30-9:00 p.m. 

Max Steinbook i- a relative newcom- 
er in the electrical appliance field. He 
gol into the broiler business in 1950 

when his lather. Isaac Steinbook. de- 
cided to turn bis somewhat dormant 
electrical heater business into a factory 
producing infra-red appliances. By 
year's end it became apparent that 
Isaac Steinbook had made a money- 
makiniz derision. Max Steinbook aban- 
doned his photography business and 
came into the Broil-Quik business as 
president. 

Rote-Broil was introduced in 1950 
bj the Roto-Broil Corp. of America. 
The firm s advertising effort, however. 
began when the account appointed 
Products Services as it- agency in Feb- 
ruary 1953. Both Albert Klinghoffer, 
president of Roto-Broil, and Les Per- 
-k\. agencj president and account ex- 
ecutive, agreed to put 85^ of Roto- 
Broil's 8450,000 ad budget for L953 
into t\. 

This decision resulted from Roto- 
Broil's successful debut on WNBT, 
\ew York, in February 1953. Roto- 
Broil's firsl t\ effort, like much of the 
firm - subsequent t\ advertising, was a 
mail-order pitch. \ $1,400 weekl) ex- 
penditure gave Roto-Broil nine an- 
nouncements per movie in Continuous 
Performance, Saturdays 2:00-5:00 
p.m. Phone ■ alls to the station and to 
department -tore- as a result of this 
t\ participation convinced Roto-Broil 
of the selling power of tv. B\ summer, 
the firm tallied 1,000 phone calls a 
week in New York alone. 

In Vugusl 1953 Roto-Broil was 
read} to increase its t\ expenditure-. 
Products Services produced a -how for 



Roto-Broil, Roto Magician, which was 
original]) done live on WJPIX, but 

paid oil -o well for the firm that it 
was then filmed for use on many sta- 
tion-. I In- 15-ininute cooking pro- 
gram contains a demonstration of a 
series of re< ipes that can be prepared 

on a rotis-erie. Koto-Broil i- < on-tant- 

l\ on camera. The film stars Lestei 
Morris, a chubby, energetic former 
pitchman, who i- dressed like a chef; 

he plays the part of a man who cooks 
a- a hobby. 

During each of a series of 39 Roto 
Magician films Lester Morris discusses 
\arious recipes for entire meal- and 
proceeds to prepare them on the Roto- 
BroiL 

Some two and a half minute- of the 
show are devoted to a straight com- 
mercial pitch a hard— ell message 
driven home b\ Lester Morris. Here's 
how ii closes : 

"All you d" i- < all for a free 10- 
i!a\ home trial of the wonderful Roto- 
Broil Custom '400' complete with all 
the handsome feature- you've Been. 
If you order now well see to it that a 
leading store in your area will deliver 
your Roto-Broil '400' riidil away." 

Roto-Broil's pluL' of the local re- 
tailer, rather than a continuation of 
their previous mail-order pitch is part 
of their attempt to expand and solidif) 
their distribution. 

This hard-sell approach paid oil in 
dollars and cents for Koto-Broil. Said 
Les Perskv. president of Products Ser- 
vices: "'Within a year Koto-Broil went 
from fifth place in national sales to 
number one spot."' 

(Broil-Quik concedes Roto-Broil's 
supremacy in New ^ ork City only; 
claims number one spot in national 
sales. I 

The Roto Magician show was put on 
\\ BIX. New \ ork, on a te-t basis, once 
a week 7:15-7:30 p.m. in August 1053. 
Within two week-, the agenc) sched- 
uled the -how across-the-board. So 
satisfied was the sponsor with the -ale- 
results <>f this program that Roto Ma- 
gician ran on four New ^ ork t\ sta- 
tions i WNBT. WIMY W MID. W VBi 
TV) as well as in 33 other market-. 

Roto-Broil'- summer air schedule 
consists of a minimum of one 15-min- 
ute show a week on each of the fol- 
lowing stations: WTTV, Bloomington; 
WBZ-TV, WTAO-TV, Boston; WICC 
TV, Bridgeport; W VYS-TV, Charlotte. 
N. C; WKRC-TV, Ch* innati; W NBK 
Cleveland; WCOS-TV, Columbia. S. 

SPONSOR 



ASK 

YOUR 

NATIONAL 

REPRESENTATIVE 



You're on the verge of a decision, and a problem. 

What business papers to pick for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, for your choice can have a telling 
effect on your national spot income. 

But where to get the facts! 

The answer is simple. Ask your national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. They learn which business 
papers are appreciated, read and discussed by buyers of broadcast time. 

His is an expert opinion. Don't overlook your national representative. 



SPONSOR 

The magazine radio and tv advertisers use 



CBS 



IN THE LAND 



GREEN BAY 



5,000 WATTS 



COMPLETE BROADCASTING 
INSTITUTION IN 



f\u/t/nonci 

WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



-AM 



-FM 



-TV 



First Stations of Virginia 

WTVR Blair TV Inc. 

WMBG Ths Bol|in 9 Co 



( : \\ T\ Y Columbus; WIAV-I), Dav- 
ton; WJBK-TV, Detroit; W I T\ . Du- 
lull.: KABC-TV, Loa Vngeles; KSTP- 
l\. Minneapolis; KMPT, Oklahoma 
City; KOMO-TV, Seattle; WRGB, 
Schenectady; \\ SPD I \ . Toledo; 
\\M\I.T\. Washington, D.C.; WSJS- 
I \ . \\ inston-Salem. 

In sonic instances the agency ran 
into resistance to the film from tv -ta- 
tions which objected to Roto-Broil's 
application of the ''Charles Antell" 
formula— the program-long pitch for a 
iuu.hu!. Howe\er, -aid Products Ser- 
vices executives, this objection oc- 
< lined rarelj and usuall) onlj incases 
where a station's lime was virtually 
complete!) sold and the station pre- 
ferred to sell participations in its own 
local cooking show. 

RotO-Broil's t\ effort — the Roto Ma- 
gician show as well as live and film 
commercials — took some 85% of the 
firm's 1953 budget. To supplement 
this tv effort in New York throughout 
the \car Roto-Broil participates in Bar- 
i\ Cray's nightlv radio newscasts over 
W MCA. 

New York has been traditionally the 
most important market for electrical 
home appliances. It was natural, there- 
fore, that the two most aggressive ro- 
tisserie manufacturers spent the bulk 
of their effort and money on becoming 
established in the New York market 
first of all. 

Prior to the development of thebroil- 
er-rotisserie, table model broilers that 
cook food through infra-red heating 
coils were being sold in the L.S. These 
had been on the market since the late 
Thirties, and here, too, the bulk of 
sales came out of New York. 

In 1946 Rotiss-O-Mat introduced a 
larger broiler for institutional use in 
restaurants and luncheonettes. This 
broiler was the first to feature a rotis- 
serie. By 1950 and 1951 several man- 
ufacturers had added these larger oven- 
type broilers to their line and in 1952 
these units outsold the old-fashioned 
table models by 10 to one. 

In 1952 some manufacturers added 
mli-series to their table broilers, rais- 
ing the retail price of these unil< bv 
2 >' - over the previous year's model. 
These broiler-rotisseries accounted for 
the greatest portion of 1953 broiler 
sales. 

Products Sen u es found earl) in 
L953 that a substantial segment of the 
rotisserie market can be reached with 
independent radio stations like \VO\R. 



which program classical music. The 
agency is currently introducing its ra- 
dio formula, successfully tested in New 
York, into other markets. Although 
The Roto Magician film has helped 
Bell M-iNseries as a necessity. Products 
Services doe- not want to overlook the 
significant portion of the population 
who <an afford rotisseries as the lux- 
urj item that it essentially is. Also 
aimed at this class of audience is Roto- 
Broil- sponsorship of The Steve Allen 
Show, WNBT. Mondays, 1 1 :20-mid- 
night 

According to store executives, Roto- 
Broil's air advertising has tremendous- 
ly increased store traffic as well as de- 
mand for the rotisserie by its brand 
name. Among stores that reported a 
big increase in business are Outlet 
Store in Providence, R. I.; Snellen- 
berg's and Litt Bros, in Philadelphia; 
People's Outfitters in Detroit: Jordan 
Marsh in Boston and Macy's in New 
York. 

As the end of 1953 came closer, 
Peerless Electric began to realize that 
Roto-Broil was rapidly becoming a 
major contender for number one place 
in sales. Roto-Broil"s distribution was 
still concentrated in eight markets. 
Broil-Quik determined to throw its 
weight into New York City to beat 
Roto-Broil in the most important elec- 
trical appliance market. 

Besides a stepped-up schedule, Broil- 
Quik further fought competition bv in- 
troducing an improved unit (retailing 
at $85.95). The price was recently 
lowered to $79.95. This Ravmond 
Loewy-styled "Broil-Quik Super Chef* 
is scheduled to receive the bulk of 1954 
advertising support. 

The unit includes a "Bake-O-Matie" 
electric tray, a "Pop-O-Matic" corn 
popper and two ""Fr\ -Squares'" to fry 
eggs. A heavy 30-day newspaper cam- 
paign started end of Ma\ to launch 
tbis higher-priced unit in New York. 
Beginning 4 June the unit was also ad- 
vertised via 230 10-second tv an- 
nouncements o\er WNBT during 
three-week period. 

Before introducing it. however, 
Peerle-s f'.le< trie cleared out its inven- 
tor) 1>\ putting it- ""Broil-Quik Robot 
Chef." a $59.95 unit, on the New Y>rk 
market in greater quantities than ever 
before. Since the Broil-Quik Robot 

Chef was available to discount houses, 

the price on this unit began to drop. 
This move was countered with further 

price cuts bv Roto-Broil. which de- 



92 



SPONSOR 



rived close to (><>'< of its 1953 sales 
from the New York market. What fol- 
lowed was a price war which lasted 
through April, and which was deep- 
ened hy the already -existing problem 
of discount houses in the New York 
area. 

Had this price war been waged in 
a declining market, both manufacturers 
could have been permanently hurt by 
it. However, three factors contributed 
toward ending the trend: (1) The de- 
mand for rotisseries kept rising under 
the pressure of intensified tv advertis- 
ing on the part of both major rotis- 
serie manufacturers. (2) The price 
war was waged in New York City, did 
not spread to other markets and could 
therefore be controlled. (3) Discount 
houses, which tend to intensify any 
price cutting, are strongest in the New 
York metropolitan area. Both manu- 
facturers claim to be fair traders and 
say that they limit distribution to out- 
lets that abide by the nationally set 
price. 

Roto-Broil Corp. of America con- 
tinued to push distribution in all ma- 
jor U.S. markets with spot tv program 
buys and participations. 

Since spring 1954 Roto-Broil has al- 
so been pushing distribution into 50 
smaller markets, forging distribution 
with its spot tv program buys. The 
pattern for forging distribution is usu- 
ally the following: Live demonstrations 
in department stores and major home 
appliance stores, followed by heavy tv 
advertising. These in-store demonstra- 
tions generally tie in with the tv pro- 
graming — in fact, Lester Morris often 
appears himself in these stores to show 
various uses of Roto-Broil. 

That his salesmanship is effective 
can be seen from just one write-in re- 
sult: In fall 1953 Roto-Broil had put 
out its own cook book to promote 
cooking with a rotisserie. This book 
retailed at $1 and was sold at the vari- 
ous stores that sell Roto-Broil. Roto- 
Broil advertised this cook book with 
announcements in the Roto Magician 
show on WPIX in October 1953. The 
announcement produced 30,000 written 
requests for the book. To date 130.000 
copies have been sold. 

Other rotisserie manufacturers have 
not advertised as aggressively as the 
two relative newcomers, Roto-Broil 
and Broil-Quik. However, the consen- 
sus among their ad managers points to 
greater use of the air media within a 
vear's time. 



>f<i rfiiu Mfg. Co., makers of Black 
bigus Kiti-series, have been making 
broilers Eor the past 15 years. The 
firm claims national distribution. In 
April 1954 they appointed Harold 
Mitchell Co. agency for Black Angus. 
No definite plans have been formu- 
lated for Black Angus to date, but it 
is certain that New York will be the 
target of the first heavy advertising 
onslaught. Tv is scheduled to get the 
predominant chunk of Black Angus' 
approximate $200,000 budget for 1954, 
though the agency hopes to use radio 
as well for greater brand name identi- 
fication. 

Dormeyer Co. advertises its rotis- 
series as one of its many electrical ap- 
pliances through John W. Shaw agency 
in Chicago. This firm, too, claims na- 
tional distribution, but Dormeyer's 
New York sales manager says that the 
firm is strongest in small-town markets 
rather than metropolitan areas like 
New York City. 

In 1953 close to three-quarters of 
the firm's $1 million advertising bud- 
get for its complete line of electrical 
products went into newspapers. Dor- 



meyer is onlj a sporadic user "I spot 

radio and t\ announcements. 

Rotiss-O-Mai Corp. introduced its 

Koliss-()-\lal in New York through the 
Getschal Co. approximately eight years 
ago. Without great advertising expen- 
diture this rotisserie gained wide dis- 
tribution, becoming strongest on the 
West Coast. However, with the entry 
of the two more aggressive competitors 
into the rotisserie field. Rotiss-O-Mat 
began usinu spot tv announcements. In 

1953 the firm increased its ad budget 
by 50% over 1952. Despite this ef- 
fort, says Rotiss-O-Mat ad manager, 
sales did not hold up against heavy- 
spending Broil-Quik and Roto-Broil. 
Rotiss-O-Mat's advertising plans for 

1954 are not yet fully formulated. 
There are six other manufacturers 

who make broilers and rotisseries. 
These, however, have regional or more 
limited distribution than the five men- 
tioned above. 

As for the two giants in the field, 
there's one thing that Roto-Broil and 
Broil-Quik agree upon : Broilers were 
a relatively dormant industry until tv 
demonstrations popularized rotisserie 
cooking. • • • 



IN SINCERE APPRECIATION 
to 

THE ART DIRECTORS CLUB 

for 

AWARD FOR DISTINCTIVE MERIT 



MICKEY SCHWARZ 

director of 

"Bather Narrator 11 — Ivory Soap Commercial 

for Procter & Gamble Company — Compton 

Advertising, Inc. 

Onlv "live" filmed commercial to win the 1954 award! 



26 JULY 1954 



93 



HAROLD STORM 

RESIGNS 

KMBC-KFRM-KMBC-TV 

Harold Storm, veteran radio 
and tele\ ision department head 
has resigned bis position as 
Dire toj "I Promotion, K\ll'>i 
Kl RM-KMBt l\ ol Kansas 
( ii\ . Storm i- seeking .1 new 
iei linn. 

In addition t" a background 
of 1 1 years "I radio and >'< 
j ears ol teleA ision, Storm ha- 
had excellent business experi- 
ence. Pi 101 t" entering radio 
Fulltime in 1940, he was di- 
ir, t.u ol radio and assistant 
advertising manager for a chain 
of gro< 11 \ stores. 1 le has had 
experience also a- an assistant 
iralli* manager and a- credit 
manager for l«.tli wholesale 

and retail credits. 

Station experience includes 
\\\ \\. Yankton. S. I).. KSO 
and KRNT, Des Moines, WOW 
and WOW-TV, Omaha, KFAB, 
Omaha and KMBC-KFRM- 
KMBC-TV, Kansas City. Well 
versed in all radio and tele- 
vision sales, promotion, pro- 
gram and managerial problems. 
Stoi in i- seeking a position 
that w ill full\ utilize his talents 
and experii nee. He is 13 vears 
old. He is stead) and moder- 
ate in all things. He and Mrs. 
Stoi in have a son and a 
daughter. Moth the young 
people are in college. Mr. 
Stoi hi i- an expert at sales pres- 
entations, publicity and ad- 
vertising. He has produced 
several industrial and docu- 
utar\ 61ms 

Vmong 1953 a iplishments 

were ten naiion.il awards foi 
k\ll!< Storm is also expei i- 
<-n< ed in publication work and 
was rei entlv named "Editor ol 
the ^ ear" l>\ the Kansas ( i|\ 

Industrial Editors. 

Storm can be reached m 5635 
Lot ust, Kansas < n\ 10, \fo. 
Telephone J ickson I -I '< or bj 

11 I lllim 1 ill r nl 

SPONSOR. 

40 E. 49 St., New York 17 



CAN UHFSELL? 

I ( ontinued from page 13 i 

qualit) and ratings, and as the numbei 
ol t\ Bets in the I ,S. increased, these 
-l<.t~ became the envj of other adver- 
tisers. I lif operators feel that a new 
pioneering < ycle is in operation <>n uhf 

outlet-. \lread\ advertisers like \n-< ,, 

i films i . Fritos > a corn snack i and 
Mogen David Wine are moving in on 
what i- like|\ to be a -erie- ol well- 
rated uhf spot pei iod-. 
• Syndicated film advertisers who 

spot their t\ film -how- in a numbei 
ol markets. V- film advertisers are 
full\ aware, network- have lately been 
striving to recapture more and more 
"station option"' time in which to aii 
late-night and afternoon network pro- 
grams. Ill i ~ puts the squeeze on \hl 
stations in main areas. W ith more 
available time in main cases than a 
competing \hf outlet, uhf stations are 
in a position to offer some prime half- 
hour evening time slots to multi-mar- 
ket film advertisers — and will guaran- 
tee the -lot for at lea>t a \ear and tin- 
rate for at least six months. 

Meanwhile as a reminder that uhf 
stations perform like other tv stations 
— that is. the) can sell merchandise 
and services successfully — SPONSOB 
presents several uhf t\ success stories. 
These reports were gathered as part of 
a SPONSOR surve) of the 122 uhf out- 
lets now on the air. 

\. linen will note the wide \ariet\ 
of both advertised products and air 
advertising vehicles. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. [WBRE-TV, Ch, 
28 I : One of the most common faults 
admen like to find with uhf televi-ioii 
is usuall) -tated as "uhf doesn't reach 
out as far as \hf and can't real!) do a 
job." This, however, doesn't take into 
account the fact that the FCC has 
granted uhf stations higher power to 
push the signal out to limits that re- 
semble vhf. WBRE-TV, for instance, 
has in-tailed a L2.5 kw. transmitter 
which gives the station (because ol 
antenna design I an effective radiated 
power of 225,000 watt- and a signal 
out to about To miles. The station 
reaches over 1.57,000 t\ families. 
Uthough WBRE-TV carries almost 

all ol the NBC I \ i ommerx ial network 

shows, it also produces main well-rat- 
ed shows for -pot advertisers. One 
such show i- Sews Review, sponsored 

bv Motor I win-, a local lord dealer. 
I he program < osts v l 18 week!) . in- 



eluding time, talent and production. 

Said Russell W. Frantz, president of 
the auto firm : 

"Motor Tu ins \<-ns Revieu has 
never failed to produce tangible sale- 
results usual!) the da) after the tele- 
cast and. in -ome instances, the re- 
Bults have been amazing. Recently the 
sale of 32 used cars was <lire< tl\ trace- 
able to one Sunda) evening telecast. 

\lan\ customers have come from dis- 
tant point- which we do not normallv 
sei ve. 

"Franklin Coslett's handling of the 
news and our advertising messages has 
been 'big league" all the way. Our 
customers ha\e told u-. time and time 
again, that the) were attracted to u- 
b) his sincerity ((interning us. Our 
salesmen swear b) him as a producer 
of lead- that are easilv converted into 
customers." 

Fresno, Cal. (KJEO-Tl . Ch. 47) : 
llii- central California market is a 
competitive market- but it's all uhf. 
Two other station-. KBID-TV i Ch. 
53) and KMJ-T\ (Ch. 24) serve be- 
tween 85,000 and 123.000 tv home-, 
depending on the station's power. In 
such an area, uhf is the only major 
source of tv; there is reall) no prob- 
lem of "conversion." 

Sales results are what you'd expect 
in a new tv area — striking. 

On 3 May 1954, for instance, a real 
estate development named Highland 
Village bought uhf tv to promote a 
new Fresno subdivision. Fir>t com- 
mercial went on the air in the 2:30 
p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Del Gore show on 
KJEO-TV. 1!\ the following morning 
Tom Roberts, general manager of the 
subdivision, called the station to re- 
port that the single commercial had 
sold three $9,000 homes directly. To- 
tal cost of the announcement on the 
uhf outlet: $31. This was a return on 
the advertiser- investment of around 
000 to one. 

Portland ', Ore. {KPTl . Ch. 27': 
Portland, hub of the nation's wealths 
Northwest section (apples, salmon. 
lumber, mining and so on), was the 
country's first post-freeze uhf market 
and as such has closer) been watched 
b) everyone from agencymen to t\ 
manufacturers. 

Portland is also proof of another 
fact: You can't make -nap judgments 

about intermixed market- particular* 
l\ if uhf gets on the air before \hf out- 
let-. Two stations serve Portland to- 
d.n KPTV, a uhf outlet, and KOIN- 



94 



SPONSOR 



i 



TV, a \hf station. KPT\ went on 
first. Results: Since the station had a 
head start in which to line up spot 
and network business, 100% of the 
sets in the Ki' I \ market are equipped 
to get both vhf and uhf. The two sta- 
tions therefore compete on an equal 
basis, each airing about half the top 
network shows. 

Reported Russell K. Olsen. manager 
of KPTV: 

"According to our most recent anal- 
ysis, our station has considerably 
more total dollar volume of business 
than the vhf station in Portland. Our 
local volume, our analysis showed, is 
more than twice as much as the local 
volume on the vhf station. This is sig- 
nificant because it shows the strong 
acceptance of uhf by the local people 
who know the situation best. Our na- 
tional business lags somewhat behind 
that of the vhf station, probably due 
mostly to the adverse publicity that uhf 
has been getting nationally. However, 
national sponsors are gradually begin- 
ning to realize that Portland is the 
outstanding uhf exception." 

Saginaw-Bay City, Mich. [WKNX- 
TV, Ch. 57 ) : Like Portland, Ore., the 
Saginaw area of Michigan I the state's 
fourth largest population area) is now 
an intermixed market, but the uhf sta- 
tion had a head start and is holding 
its own against newcomer WNEM-TV, 
a vhf outlet. According to the station, 
there are some 100,000 uhf-equipped 
homes in the WKNX-TV area. In the 
near future, the station expects to go 
from its present ERP rating of 19.000 
watts to 207.000 watts, thus intensify- 
ing and expanding its signal. 

Among WKNX-TV's success stories 
is this one for the John Schmelzer Fur- 
niture company (see photo page 42). 
Late in April, the firm contracted for 
three one-minute announcements fea- 
turing a stock of "television swivel 
rockers." A live announcement, pro- 
duced by the station, was used. Re- 
sult: with the first announcement the 
entire stock of 24 rockers was sold 
($59.50 each I and an additional dozen 
rockers for $79.50 each were also sold. 
Thus, for an investment of $86.34 the 
store sold $2,364 worth of merchan- 
dise. Sales cost: about 3% of the 
total sales return. The sponsor had 
to shift his other two announcements 
to one-minute films featuring Simmons 
Mattresses, which in turn again boost- 
ed product sales. At this time, the 
market was intermixed between vhf 

26 JULY 1954 



and uhf. 

\i andthei time, also after the vhi 

Station started, a local auto dealer 

boughl a live show Featuring local 
amateur and semi-pro talent. Last Jan- 
uary, the first program in the series 

produced 3,800 letters a- part of the 
voting (it later rose to 7.000 weekly I. 
On the second program, the sponsor 
advertised five useil cars, even though 
it was the height of winter. Three 
hours later, all five cars were sold and 
bv the following morning two new cars 
were sold as well. 

West Palm Beach. Flu. [W1RK-TV, 
Ch. 21) : This famous resort market is 
still a uhf-only area, although a vhl 
station is expected soon and some 
fringe vhf reception comes into the 
area. Station Manager Arthur L. Gra\ . 
however, is confident about the out- 
let's future. He told sponsor: 

"Channel Two through 82 is televi- 
sion. It should not be separated by the 
trade into a giant and little brother. 
Some operators opened a uhf tv sta- 
tion as if they wanted to go into com- 
petition with WNBT, not like a sound 
business. If some operator wants to 
open a tv station as a majestic symbol 
to his ego, that's fine — but don't holler 



when the dough coming in imi t equal 
in the dough going out. 

Typical ol the local success stories 
enjoyed l>\ the station is that of ll"l- 
ness Motors, a local Ford dealer, who 
recentlj told the station : 

"We contracted for a spol on youi 
opening night w itli a certain amount ol 
misgiving. However, from the tele- 
phone calls and personal contacts that 
we made as a result of that spot, we 
aie happy to be in a position to con- 
tract for spot announcements thai will 
run for the next year. This advertising 
medium has opened a new potential 
with us for customers. Keep up the 
good work." 

Pittsburgh, Pa. {WKJF-TV, Ch. 
53) : This important Industrial me- 
tropolis, home of Gulf Oil, Westing- 
house and U. S. Steel, has long been a 
problem market for tv advertisers. The 
one vhf station on the air. Du Mont- 
owned WDTV, has been jammed with 
network shows for several years. But 
two uhf outlets, WKJF-TV and WENS, 
have recently been a factor in creating 
new competition in this area. 

WKJF-TV, however, recently sus- 
pended tv operations (although it did 
not return its c.p. to the FCC I . Rea- 



WORDS TO THE WISE 

MICKEY SCHWARZ, president of A.T.V. Film 

Productions, has been assigned by Compton 
Advertising, Inc., — for the Second year 
— to produce and direct Procter & 
Gambles "Fireside Theater" formats 
and commercials, featuring screen star 
Gene Raymond, for the 1954-55 season. 

A. T. V. FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1600 Broadway • New York 19, N. Y. • Circle 7-6434 

"Creative Motion Pictures for Television" 



95 



son: nol enough advertising —ti|»j.«»i t 
tn. in eithei network "i Bpol advertis- 
Most sponsors, it appeared, pre- 
t,i red i" ■ i owd "ni" the lo» .il \ lil "in- 
let Bomewhere rather than take .1 
- hance on uhf, even though the < on- 
version rate was ovei 10' in .1 mil- 
lion-tv*home area. 

Not thai \\ K II I \ didn'l | Iu< e 

results. It did. I lere i- ;i i\ pica! local 
-hi . • 

Pi mi Baking < !o., w hich 1 una a 
chain "I eight stores, bought three 15- 
minute segments on the locall) pro- 
duced Ernie \eff show, which fea- 
tured organist Neff playing request 
numbers. Vftei the se< ond set "I three 
segments, the owner of the Perm llak- 
ing chain reported that his business 
had doubled, with man) people dail) 
asking F01 I 1 nie Neff specials. 

Sacramento, Col. (KCCC-TV, Ch. 
10): Operating in a uhf-onl) market, 
K( ( C-T\ - genera] manager, \-hle\ 
L. Robison, told SPONSOR of these lo- 
cal-level sua esses: 

Mogen David Wine This national 
spot advertise] uses the Dollar A Sec- 
ond show in Sacramento. The local 
disti ibutor reported that after three 




months on the aii sales had increased 
ovei the Novembei I •>• ember- 
Januarj level ol the pre^ ious war. 

.--kin Deep In Bix weeks, ilii- new 
beaut) product obtained ovei 90^5 dis- 
ti ibution in tin- k(!C(!-'l \ coverage 

ana ami some $5,000 in -ales. 

kiii Inn Fresh Potato Chips Spon- 
sors of the locall) produced iWj.nm and 
SiSi program and using no other ad- 
vertising, this firm in a few weeks ex- 
tended its deliver) routes and added 

two additional 1 1 inks as a result of 
t\ -indu< ed sales. 

The station i- affiliated with all four 
t\ networks on a per-program basis. 

• • • 



STATE FARM 
(Continued from page 35 1 

agenc) lone b) supporting its sales 
efforts. 

3. To obtain new sales by acquaint- 
ing prospective members with State 
Farm and its advantages. 

Previous to February 10.">] 1 when 
the firm started in radio I. State Farm 
used onl\ magazines, headed by Life 
and Time and including science and 
farm publications. Feeling that its 
print schedule needed some supple- 
menting and that it would also like 
to get it> message across with greater 
urgenc) and frequency than the mag- 
azines allowed, the firm turned to net- 
work radio. This air medium was at- 
tractive because it not only offered 
the opportunit) to reach a large audi- 
ence but it also allowed the flexibilit) 
of "dealer cut-ins." The local State 
Farm agent could break into the net- 
work commercial and <:i\e his name. 
address and phone number. Since 
Stale farm operates through its local 
agents, this would naturall) be of in- 
estimable value. 

So in Februar) lo.~>] State Farm 
began sponsorship of Cecil Brown on 
Mutual on a once-a-week basis. The 
firm's total ad budget then was $450,- 
000, with approximatel) $200,000 go- 
ing for the radio effort. 

In December 1951, Cecil Brown was 
expanded to twice a week 1 ti\ e min- 
utes per show I. I hi- 1 ontinued till 
March 1954 when the Saturda) night 
Brown -how was supplanted with a 
10-minute sportscasl b) Jack Brick- 
house. I he Brown show on Sunda) 
was also expanded to I" minute-. 

In sponsoring a commentator like 



Brown. Mate Farm i- aware that he 
will often express controversial views 
and that it- sponsorship might be 
construed as tacit endorsement The 
company, however, look- on the edi- 
torial portion of the program as al- 
ino-i separate from the commercial a- 
pect; it states that it i- buying an au- 
dience, not Brown's views, and that 
it- 011K endorsement of Brown i- its 
approval ol the size audience he makes 
available for the firm's commercial 
message. "We don't presume to have 
an) deep-down philosophy on this sub- 
ject," says Bischoff, "and feel that it's 
a problem for the network- and broad- 
casters in general to re-ol\e." 

The company tries to coordinate 

and retain a basic identit) in both the 
air and print efforts. Currently, the 
cop) theme i- centered around careful 
driving. Print ads appear in Life, 
I ' imr. Popular Science, Popular Me- 
chanics, Farm Journal. Successful 
Fanning and about a half dozen other 
farm publication-. 

Radio pluu- are delivered bj an- 
nouncer Ted \Ialle\ on the Brown 
-how. Ii\ Jack Brickhouse himself on 
his program. Here i- a typical com- 
mercial b\ Brickhouse: 

Do you think your auto insurance 
cost is too high? Would you like to 
cut it down cut it down perhaps as 
much a.s 10', without cutting down 
benefits? Well, if you're the fond of 
driver who's careful, uses good jmlg- 
rneut and common sense when behind 

the wheel, it should be easy for \<>u to 

do. For it should be easy for you to 
qualify for membership with State 
Farm Mutual the famous "careful 
driver insurance company" 

The cost of State Farm insurance is 
loner than the cost of ordinary auto 
insurance — in many areas as much as 
|i»', lower — because State Farm de- 
liberately aims to insure careful driv- 
ers only. This holds accident costs to 
a minimum. For full details includ- 
ing the exact amount you can save il 
you qualify ior membership, talk to 
any one of State Farm's 7.000 agents. 
There's no obligation, of course. Ami 
I'll be back at the end of the program 
to tell you hou to contact the agent 
nearest \ou. 

At the end of the program, local 
agents are identified on individual sta- 
tions. 

State Farm has made use of this lo- 
cal cut-in in another way. When states 
were passing safety responsibilit) laws 



96 



SPONSOR 



t.bl' 



ol Con<« 



r* »'» ,-)M 



•F""""",. 









TELECASTING 



Newly Published . 
for Everyday Use 



The Industry's Acknowledged Reference Guide 

Fall 1954 TV Factbook 

Semi-annual Edifion of July 15, 1954 (400-pp.) 

Contains more than 50 directories, in one 
convenient volume, giving you the precise 
information you need, quickly, accurately, 
and completely . . . saving you countless 
hours of valuable time. 



TELEVISION STATION DIRECTORY 

Rate digests, personnel, facilities, and other data covering all 

commercial telecasting stations in operation in the United States 

and Canada as of July 15, 1954, 
TELEVISION NETWORKS: RATES, PERSONNEL & DATA 

With inter-city hookups presently available via coaxial-microwave 

connections. 
TELEVISION STATIONS IN LATIN AMERICA 

Operating or authorized as of July 15, 1954— with personnel, 

facilities and other data. 
FOREIGN TELEVISION STATIONS 

Operating or planned as of July 15, 1954. 
TELEVISION STATIONS OF THE U. S. BY CALL LETTERS 
EXPERIMENTAL TV STATIONS AUTHORIZED BY THE FCC 

Status as of July 15, 1954. 
OWNERSHIP OF TELEVISION STATIONS BY CATEGORIES 

Networks, newspapers, theatres & manufacturers owning or hold- 
ing interests in TV stations; multiple ownerships. 
SALES & TRANSFERS OF TV STATIONS, 1949-54 

Including purchase prices, principals, etc. 
FINANCIAL DATA ON TV & RADIO STATIONS: 1946-53 

Summaries as compiled by FCC Economics Division. 
NETWORK TELEVISION & RADIO BILLINGS 

Tabulated by months: 1949-54. 
THE TOP 100 NATIONAL ADVERTISERS OF 1953 

Listing dollar expenditures in the four major media. 
NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES OF TV STATIONS 

Including branch offices and lists of stations represented. 
MAJOR ADVERTISING AGENCIES OF U. S , CANADA & MEXICO 
TELEVISION PROGRAM SOURCES 

Directory of owners, producers & syndicators of live and film 

material offered to TV stations. 
TELEVISION SETS-IN-USE 

Latest available statistics. 
CONGRESSIONAL TV-RADIO GALLERIES 
FCC COLOR TV STANDARDS 

With Appendix describing operation of new system. 






)MAP OF TV AREAS & NETWORK ROUTES (Color Insert) 
(43 x 29-in.) 
Showing present and projected microwave and coaxial routes 
(accurately drawn by AT&T engineers), time zones, all stations 
in operation, all cities over 10,000 pop., all cities with TV 
applications or CPs. 



NEW STATION APPLICATIONS & CPs 



CONSTRUCTION PERMITS ISSUED FOR NEW TV STATIONS 
List of oil CPs granted and their possible storting dates. 

APPLICATIONS PENDING FOR NEW TV STATIONS 

Complete tabulation of all applications filed with FCC, includ- 
ing addresses, facilities sought, proposed equipment, principals 
and other data. 



CHANNEL ALLOCATIONS 



VHF & UHF ALLOCATIONS BY STATES AND CITIES 
Including U. S. Territories and Possessions. 

VHF & UHF ALLOCATIONS BY CHANNELS 
Under New FCC Rules & Regulations. 

CHANNEL ALLOCATIONS FOR CANADA AND MEXICO 
Assignments affecting border areas. 

STATIONS AUTHORIZED, BY CHANNELS 



MANUFACTURING 



TELEVISION RECEIVER MANUFACTURERS OF U. S. & CANADA 

With addresses, executives, plants, etc. 
CATHODE RAY & RECEIVING TUBE MANUFACTURERS 

Including manufacturers of tube blanks, metal cones, face plates. 
MANUFACTURERS OF TV TUNERS 

Including manufacturers of UHF converters. 
TV RECEIVING ANTENNA MANUFACTURERS 

With trade names and description of products, etc. 
PHONOGRAPH & RECORD MANUFACTURERS 
TELECASTING EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS 

Directory of manufacturers of transmitters, towers, antennas, 

studio equipment, theatre TV, industrial TV, community TV. 
TELEVISION RECEIVER PRODUCTION 

As estimated by RETMA, by months; 1947-54. 
RADIO RECEIVER PRODUCTION 

As estimated by RETMA, by years; 1924-54. 
FACTORY, DISTRIBUTOR & RETAIL SALES 8 INVENTORIES 

TV and radio, as estimated by RETMA by months; 1950-54. 
TV & RADIO TUBE SALES 

As estimated by RETMA, by years; 1922-54. 
FINANCIAL DATA ON TV-ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURERS 

Year-by-year tabulation of sales, profits and dividends. 



MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 



FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
Directory of organization and personnel. 

ATTORNEYS PRACTICING BEFORE THE FCC 
Specializing in TV-radio practice. 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS & ENGINEERING SERVICES 

Directories of engineers specializing in TV and radio, technical 
services, management and planning services, station brokers, 
network engineering departments, etc. 

ORGANIZATIONS DEALING WITH TELEVISION 

Advertising, broadcasting & telecasting; motion picture & re- 
lated groups; music licensors; technical groups; manufacturing, 
merchandising & servicing. 

RESEARCH ORGANIZATION DEALING WITH TELEVISION 

LABOR UNIONS IN TV, RADIO & RELATED FIELDS 

PUBLICATIONS DEALING WITH TELEVISION 

Trade, technical and advertising periodicals. 

CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES HANDLING TV-RADIO MATTERS 

"HEATRE-TV INSTALLATIONS IN USE 

COMMUNITY TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEMS 

State-&-City directory of those in operation, under construction 
or planned. 

VOLUME OF ADVERTISING IN U. S. BY MEDIA, 1946-54 



Television Digest 

Wyatt Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Please send me copies of Fall 1954 TV Factbook 

(including map) (ffi $4.00 per copy. 



Name 



Company 

Address 

City 



□ check herewith 



□ bill 



26 JULY 1954 



97 




WTR1 

ALBANY SCHENECTADY TROY, 



cfelfvef® 



90,000 



UHFSett 



SEE YOUR 
HEADLEY-REED Man 



OTHMWi njimwi 

If you use TV film 
you need BONDED 
TV film service! 

Saves You Money, Worry 
and Mistakes! 

COMPLETE TV FILM SERVICE FOR 
PROGRAMS OR COMMERCIALS 

Shipping • Splicing • Routing, 

Scheduling, Print Control 

Records • Examination, 

Repair, Cleaning, Report on 

Print Condition • Storage 

Supplies, Equipment 



(NDED 



TV FILM SERVICE 

LOS ANGELES • NEW YORK 

904 N. la Cientgo 630 Ninth Ave. 

BR 2-7875 JU 6-1030 



FASTER, SAFER, LESS COSTLY... 

Because It's More Efficient I 



a few years ba< k. the auto insurance 
companies were conducting intensive 
i ampaigns in ea< b state dui ing an 
agreed-on pei iod prioi to 1 1 1 « - effei tive 
date of the law. State Faun utilized 
its radio facilities for the campaigns 
by separating the affected Btates from 
the real "I the network during the com- 
mercial time, jii\in'j each local cam- 
paign greater effectiveness by having 

il associated with a national network 
show . 

"Radio- states spokesman Bisi li< -IT. 
"i- most effective when used consis- 
tently .uhI often. It- effectiveness stems 
from it- repetitive impact. I he same 
message drummed over and over again 
into tin' listener - consciousness lias a 
cumulative effect. This is aided by 
radio- compatibility with other activi- 
ties. 

But State Farm also has a high re- 
gard for t\ which, it states, "has the 
unequalled advantage of visual demon- 
stration." 

Currently, the firm is testing tv on 
the West Coast. The venture started 



(6 [Each of u> ha> a responsibility] to 
in-i-t that violations of pood faith and 
taste and sense are never as good a* 
when these are preserved. This, I be- 
lieve, takes a good deal !«*>> courage 
than conviction — and a dedication to 
the proposition that advertising is much 
belter, more resultful and less costly 
and more satisfying at its best." 

FAIRFAX M. CONE 

/'resident 

Foote. Cone & Belding 

Vew York 



in \piil 1954, is running on CBS sta- 
tions in three markets. San Francisco. 
Los \ngeles and San Diego. It con- 
sists of participations in a Morning 
Shou type of program called Pano- 
niimi Pacific, aired from 7:00-9:00 
a.m. in which State Farm sponsors a 
news segment twice a week. However, 
it i- a- \et too earl\ to predict am re- 
sults from this test, says the company. 
\<n can it be definite at this time 
aboul an) future t\ actfc it\ . 

The State Farm Mutual \utomobile 
Insurance Co. is the oldest ol the three 
State Farm companies. It was found- 
ill in 1922 and l>\ 1942 had grown to 
first place in the auto insurance indus- 
try. It has continued in this position 
to the present time, today insures well 
ovei 3,000,000 autos. 

State Farm's Life companj came in- 



to being in 1929, the Fire and Cas- 
ualty company in 1936. These com- 
panies, too, are showing healths busi- 
ness increase-: the Life income was up 
36$ in 1953 over L952, the Fire 33%. 
I he nation s general economic Btate, 
according to the company, affects State 
Farm's business only to the extent of 
modifying it- growth rate in national 
downturn- and slightl) boosting it in 

upturns. In other words, the company 

has none ut the cyclical peaks and val- 
leys most businesses experience, onlj 
peaks. 

State farm look- to the future with 
extreme optimism, sees only continued 
growth. It Bays, with >ix million new 
autos in the I .S. next year, it figures 
somebody is going to insure them. 
\l-o. somebody is going to sell life in- 
surance to the "million new families," 
and somebody i- going to insure the 
■■'Jin ).(!( in new dwellings" against fire, 
i Ml figures are State Farm's, con- 
tained in its report. "People, Policies 
and Progress in 1953.") 

For the State Farm Mutual Auto- 
mobile Insurance Co. the In wind i- 
now. "If we could write the third mil- 
lion in '53, we can write the fourth 
million in '55." * * * 



CROUP APPROACH 

{Continued jrom page 38) 

ket list is generally the re-ult of pre- 
liminary agency-client meetings at- 
tended by the account people, someone 
from marketing, possibly the media di- 
rector or the associate media director. 

During these preliminary meeting- not 
only the markets hut the budget and 
length of the campaign are decided 
upon. Timebuyers are rarely called 
into these meetings. 

\fler the preliminary meetings the 
media department is asked through 
the account group to make recommen- 
dations on this budget The-e recom- 
mendations might -how tlie number of 
announcements the client could afford 
per market per week for the duration 
of the projected campaign. 

"Some three months may pa— be- 
tween the budget allocation and get- 
ting the client's go-ahead on a cam- 
paign," one timebuyer told sponsor. 

From the client's market li-t the 
timebuyer then sets up file folders on 
a "per market" basis. He then com- 
piles a list of all the stations in each 
of the market- on the list from Stand- 
ard Rate and Data. \ < hart i- made 



98 



SPONSOR 



up 1>\ markets showing each station 
and its rep. This chart serves as a 
checklist of necessary calls to reps and 
stations, if these are not represented. 

From this checklist the buyer or his 
assistant or secretary calls the reps 
and tells them what he wants. It gener- 
ally takes between half a daj and two 
days to make these calls. If the assis- 
tant or the timebuyer's secretary makes 
the call, the rep often calls the time- 
huyer back directly to confirm the 
availabilities he wants and to make a 
pitch for the business. 

Usually the timebuyer gives the rep 
about one week to send along the avail- 
abilities. He then uses a second check- 
list to mark off the station, its power, 
its rep and whether the availabilities 
are in or not. When all the availabili- 
ties for a particular market are in, the 
buyer makes a choke and is readv to 
place the campaign. 

However, it usually takes from three 
days to four weeks between receipt of 
availabilities and the start of the cam- 
paign. Because of this lapse of time 
during which the client signs estimates, 
some time slots originally offered to 
the buyer by a station or rep may no 
longer be available. 

After making his choice from among 
the availabilities, the timebuyer gets 
verbal and then written confirmation 
from the reps. This must be checked 
for accuracy by his assistant or sec- 
retary. He also has to check on make- 
goods and credits. 

After he has placed an order in a 
market, he notifies the traffic depart- 
ment to send copy to the station. 

Once he has received written or ver- 
bal confirmation from the reps, he 
sends schedules out to the client (for 
field men, distributors, jobbers, oth- 
ers I . These schedules include the name 
of the station, length of the schedule, 
length of the commercial, whether it's 
iive or e.t., the name of the adjacencies 
and their ratings, if available. 

During the course of a typical 13- 
week national spot campaign a time- 
buyer's contacts with other agencymen, 
clients, reps and stations may number 
200 or more (see chart on page 37). 

At Benton & Bowles, a timebuyer 
would be in touch with the associate 
and/or assistant media director at least 
three times daily during the prepara- 
tory stages of the campaign. 

Before making recommendations, 
he'd have some two or three contacts 
with Broadcast Analysis, within the 



media department. 

He might possibl) see the client once 
or tw ice during course ol campaign. 

lied see the account people at least 
lu ice a day . 

Before the planning of the campaign 
he might see the v.p. in charge of me- 
dia some five or six times. 

rhroughout the campaign he'd be in 
touch with other buyers within and 
outside his group once daily. 

On the two days when he's ordering 
availabilities, he'd be in touch with the 
reps 15 or 20 times. 



During the tlm-c <>i [oui days when 
the reps submit availabilities. In-'d 
ha\e ~i\ <>r seven contacts with them. 

For a week afterward, he'd be check- 
ing additions and confirmations, and 
would have contact with reps about 
lw ice <lail\ . i He might also have three 
or four contacts with -latum people 
direct. I 

His total contacts with the Traffic 
Department would number at least 



eight. 



Until four weeks after campaign is 
complete he'd see estimators and con- 



DOMINATES 
THE IMPORTANT 



VifiZLfcZiia 



IN OMAHA ! 



Of the 196 weekly quarter hours 
between 5 p.m. and 12 p.m. 
WOW-TV places ahead in 106*. 

WOW-TV also has eight out of 
the top ten multi-weekly pro- 
grams. Five of these eight 
programs are local.** 

♦American Research Bureau, Feb. 1954 
**Pulse Inc., March 1954 




OMAHA • MAX. POWER • DUMONT • NBC-TV Aff . 
A MEREDITH STATION — BLAIR TV, Rep. 

Affiliated with "Batter Hemes and Gardens" and "Successful 
Farming" Magazines. 



26 JULY 1954 



99 



trad people three times dail) , 

I rora the time the campaign is al- 
most - ompleted until about six to eight 
weeks later he bas al least two con- 
i.i. i- dail) w ith the a< i ounting depai t- 
tnent, 

Although the timebuyei is not ai 
tuall) present .n most preliminar) 
meetings, lii- recommendations and 
specialized knowledge form the basis 
< . t the associate media directoi - pro- 
posals and pres< ntation to the a< count 
group <>i client. I hi associate media 
.In. . tors, \ .p. in < harge "I media and 
senioi \ .p. in charge "I marketing are 
part ol a Media Planning Committee, 
whose decisions rest upon the infor- 
mation gathered from the timebuyers 
and spacebuyers. 

Here's how Charles Pooler, B&B 
Benior v.p. of marketing, outlines the 
advantages <>! the group system: 

"The accounts gel the direct atten- 
tion of several rather than one all-me- 
dia man. The individual buyers have 
.1 • bance to gel greatei understanding 
of the marketing problems oi t ln-ir ac- 
counts through dail) contact with ac- 
count personnel and the associate and 
assistant media directors. 

Dave Crane, B&B v.p. in charge of 
media, added that the group -\-tem 




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has given media recommendations 
more objectivity. "Rather than one 
we now have Beven or eight all-media 
men. This helps us \>> have a strnngei 
balance in planning sessions. Of 
course, this operation is more expen- 
sive foi the agencj because manage- 
ment now has more high-priced guys 
on tin- pa) mil bul it - given the me- 
dia department more stature, and the 
clients far better service." 

The associate media director's re- 
sponsibilities are broad in scope. He 
directs media planning incoordination 
with account groups, and. when neces- 
sary, nut l- vsilh the Media Planning 
( iommittee. 

He serves as primary contact with 
the client and account supervisor in 
behalf of the media department. 

He i> the one who organizes and de- 
velops assignments within his group. 
\nil he ma\ also establish media poli- 
cies and methodology of evaluation ap- 
plicable to his group. Above all, he is 
the head of creative media planning 
for his group. 

The assistant media director acts as 
his alter ego, executing approved plans 
through the buyers. He's the coordi- 
nator within the group, because he's 
the point where print and broadcast 
media are brought together. 

Network planning and negotiating 
are done by the associate media direc- 
tor in conjunction with the radio-tv 
program department. Timebuyers 
function here is mainly to clear sta- 
tions and to accept delay time. 

Mam other agencies have a similar 

syste f organization. McCann-Erick- 

son, for example, regrouped the people 
in it- media department in summer 
1952. Bill Dekker, \.p. and director 
of media for McC.ann-I.rickson, said 
that the main objective of the reorgan- 
ization was to develop "a higher de- 
gree of account responsibility and su- 
pen ision." 

McCann-Erickson's media depart- 
ment is divided into three groups, ea< h 
headed h\ an associate media director. 
I nder the associate media directoi 
there- a print supervisor and radio-tv 
supervisoi with assistants and estima- 
tors undei each. In oilier words. M<- 
Cann-Erickson has the equivalent of 
B&B's Media Services group divided 
among the three operational groups. 
However, outdoor and transportation 
advertising form a separate section 

within the media department which 

serves as a pool for the three account 



groups. 

I he account groups at \l<(!ann- 
Erickson are also determined l>\ work- 
load and for administrative reason- 
rather than on the basis of product 

category. I hese groups i omprise Borne 

1") broadcast media supervisors and 
buyers, whose salaries range from 

>.->.( II HI to SI ].i H 10. 

Vnthon) I lePiei ro, \ .p. and media 
diro i"i al Lennen \ Newell. Bays that 
hi> media department "is based on an 

integrated plan, broken down b\ ac- 
COUnl groups." Lennen \ \euell has 
lour such account groups, divided b) 
billings and work. I here are four 
group supervisors and about four buy- 
ers on each type of medium. 

Well over half ol the top 20 radio-t\ 
agencies follow some variation of the 
group system in the organization of 
their media department. In some in- 
stance-, the estimating and contract 
people are organized into a pool that 
supplies the buyers in their various ac- 
count groups. In other cases, estima- 
tors are assigned to the buyers with- 
in specific account groups. Differences 
also exist in terms of the media de- 
partment"- jurisdiction over media re- 
search. 

The trend of major agencies toward 
reorganization began in the postwar 
period. Although the structure of 
media departments is -till in a state of 
(lux in most of the top agencies, a gen- 
eral reappraisal b\ agency manage- 
ment of media organization has led to 
widespread change toward this more 
integrated system. (For details about 
the background of the three systems of 
media organization see sponsor. 25 
\uiMist 1952. i * • • 



CREATIVE AND 
CONSCIENTIOUS 

TV Producer-Director now 

working in major market. 
Experienced in all types of 
local programming. Seeks new 
position wit I i station, agency, 
or TV program producer. 
Any w here. 

Box 726 

SPONSOR 

40 E. 49th St., NY 17 



100 



SPONSOR 






I 



BARBER'S SUPER MARKET 

{Continued from page 39) 

with two local air vehicles: 

1. What's Cookin' 110:30 a.m. -10: 
45 a.m., Monday-through-Friday) on 
KABQ. As described to SPONSOR l>\ 
KABQ's young (23) program direc- 
tor, Lowell Christison. it's "an audi- 
ence participation show where house- 
wives try to guess the correct title of a 
recipe in Barber's Master Cookbook 
when the ingredients are mentioned on 
the air. Both ends of the conversa- 
tion are broadcast, using a beeper note 
on the phone. Various local prizes are 
given." The show, incidentally, has 
done so well for Barber's that the firm 
is contemplating expansion to a daily 
half hour. 

2. Country Melodies 1 8:30 a.m.- 
9:00 a.m., Monday-through-Friday) on 
KOAT. Since Albuquerque is a Span- 
ish-American city rich in the history 
of the Southwest. Barber's wins a siz- 
able listening audience with a combi- 
nation of folksy Western music and 
homemaking hints in the second of its 
daily shows. Both programs use com- 
mercials ( usually featuring nationally 
advertised products ) which are geared 
to produce specific sales, but which 
avoid any hoopla about "best prices in 
town." 

Starting Thursday at noon. Barber's 
really blankets Albuquerque's outlets. 

A total of 130 announcements are 
aired during the weekend. KABQ and 
KOAT each carry 30 announcements, 
KGGM carries 20 and KOB airs 50 
time-signal station breaks. 

Barber's air tactics pay off in sales. 
For example: 

• A few months ago, Barber's 
stocked a then-new brand of chili which 
had no distribution previously in the 
Albuquerque market. For 13 weeks, 
Barber's featured it strongly on its 
radio shows and announcements. Based 
on what Barber's had figured would 
be a fair quota, sales on the item 
reached a point 300% above the pre- 
set quota. And. due to Barber's air 
advertising, which was the only me- 
dium used in this case, apart from store 
displays, public demand for the prod- 
uct was so great that jobbers had to 
place it in 54 other outlets in the local 
trade area. 

• At another time recently, the 
"Barber's radio treatment" resulted in 
sales increases of from 237% to 331% 
on the products of a regional meat 
packer after a 13-week air drive. And, 

26 JULY 1954 



after 2(> weeks of being featured in 
Barber's program-announcement sched- 
ule sales increased 283$ "ii a brand 
of cottage cheese. In both of these 
cases, no other promotion was used In 
Barber's apart from in-store displays. 

So successful has radio been for 
Barber's that it's oidy natural to ask: 
\\ hy use anything else? 

Adman Al Brower, however, felt il 
would be a mistake to use one medium 
to the exclusion of all others to pro- 
mote retail sales. 

As KABQ's Lowell Christison re- 
ported to SPONSOR: 

"Basically the same messages are 
carried home on the weekend an- 
nouncements and weekend newspaper 
ads. If reduced to a simple statement 
of technique, the statement would be 
'60% of the budget in radio, 40% in 
newspapers.' The original formula was 
devised partially as a result of the BAB 
and Kroger studies (see "You need 
both," sponsor 23 February 1953, 
page 40) which showed that about 
35' i of total population would get the 
message from radio; and about 35% 
would get the message from black-and- 
white space, no more than 8% to 10' < 
of consumers getting the messages in 



I Mlh media. 

"I hough Bai ber's has, from time to 
lime, run specific tests for individual 
stations used, they've found that radio 
and newspapers are quite comparable 
on actual sales results for given spe- 
cials, as pertains to volume of items 

sold. 

"Of course, we at KABQ feel that it 
is on this point that radio takes the 
lead. But Al Brower of Harhei - says 
that in most cases Barber's will pur- 
posely over-buy on a given item that 
could be a traffic builder, run it in 
their weekend newspaper ads and tie 
il in as a radio special in their satura- 
tion spot announcements. He figures 
the papers sell their usual amount and 
the extra volume created by radio is 
profit over and above what they'd 
otherwise expect. 

"Barber's has consistentlv found 
that tying the two media together is 
the most profitable advertising pro- 
cedure. For that reason, specials are 
usually carefully grouped and evenly 
distributed throughout both papers and 
radio. 

"Of the many items in a full-page 
ad. for instance, three of the produce 
specials, three of the grocery specials 



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GUILD FILMS 

Company, Inc. 

420 Madison Avenue New York 17, NY 

Producers & Distributors of 
LIBERACE LIFE WITH ELIZABETH 
FRANKIE LAINE FLORIAN ZABACH 



101 



;tml three meal spe< ials are Belei ted to 
run .1- radio »pe< iaU to fil into theii 
[0 t» ond and time-signal saturation 
i ampaign. 

H.ii ber's exei utives fohn W illiams, 
i.il manager, \. I M< Lane, as- 
sistant i" W illiams and adman \l 
Browei haven't overlooked other air 
advertising opportunities either. 

Albuquerque, a growing market "I 
some 1 50,000 population in < enti .il 
New Mexico, has three t\ Btations — 
KGGM-TV, KOAT-TV and KOB-TV, 
.ill vhl outlet-. \ikI. i\ is used fairl) 
lici\ ilj bj the ihh < losesl grocer) com- 
petitors to Barbei -. 

In 1953, Barber's ran a L3-week tv 
test, using a bj ndicated half-houi film 
-In .\n . Cost : aboul 15,200. 

Brower's comment : "Tangible results 
were negligible." However, he quali- 
fies tin- b) - 1\ ing that a number ol 
factors ma) have caused the unsatis- 
1. 1, tor) pull of the i\ campaign, "either 
the wrong type ol show, poor handling 
<>i our own presentation not perfected. 

In ;m\ case, ii<> tv is being used in 
L95 1 and none is planned for the near 
future. Radio is the big feature of 
Barber's ad budgets. 

In 1953, Barber's spent about Si!.">.- 




Mary McCuire. WWTV 
Homcmakcr helps 
Cherry Queen Gail 
Krahnke check Chef's 
"Cherried Ham'' at N.i 
rional Cherry Festival 
covered completely 
by WWTV 16 mm. 
cameraman Charle; Ray 

YOU'RE WITH TV AT 
ITS BEST ON M/M/TIM 

Michigan ' hanni I 13 » nun- and theii 
thousand!) "i Summei Resort ii 

■ I toui i onsecul ive da) - ol com- 
plete I') mm. IiImi i ihi coloi 
tut National < hei i j Festival .1 ulj 6 9. 
rhey'll love you too . . . on WWTV. 
CADILLAC ><~*N. MICHIGAN 




\i- 1 ( h 

$V££D 



BC, DUMONT 
S CXf/D. KPDS 



200 with Borne 138,000 going to radio. 
000 to newspapers, $5,200 to the 
t\ test .mil $10,000 foi othei form- of 
,iil\ ertising. 

In L954, the ad budget is running 
aboul H» ovei the 1953 total. Radio 
now gets about 60%, newspapers 
around 35^? and other forms of adver- 
tising a I ion I 5%. 

The outlook for 1955 (Barber's is 
alread) deep in next year's plans) is 
similar. \ I"', over-all hike in the 
ad budget is anticipated with radio re- 
taining the same percentage. Again, 
no t\ i> planned for 1955. 

Barber's manages to get extra mile- 
age in it- air advertising through the 
judicious use of cooperative advertis- 
ing funds, although no co-op figures 
are included in tin- budgets cited above 
which are Barber's own expenditures. 

Obtaining an over-all figure on the 
co-op share of Barber s total expendi- 
tures is naturall) difficult, since co- 
op ad budgets are figured 1>\ some 
manufacturers on a straight percent- 
age basis, and by others on a per-case 
allotment. But. according to Barbei '- 
own guess, it works out to about 20' r 
to 2.V i of the grand total spent bv 
Barber's for advertising. 

Some blue-chip brand names are 
thus featured in Barber's air advertis- 
ing. Barber's co-op arrangements in- 
clude such clients as: Colgate. Kleenex. 
Swift, \al>isco, Armour's. Wilson. 
Snow Crop and many others, as well as 
a number of regional dair\ produce 
and meat firms. 

The advertising arrangements in 
these cases are cooperative in every 
sense of the word: Barbers feels that 
the national advertisers are helping the 
store chain as much as the store chain 
promotes them. "Barber's," says ad- 
man Brower, "is built on the qualitv 
and reputation of national brands. 
From time to time, on special promo- 
tional efforts, price is of the essence. 
But as an over-all theme. Barber's en- 
tire advertising is based simpl) on let- 
ting people know what we have." 

\nd. Barbei - make- extensive use of 
the radio co-op sales aids provided to 

ui ries bv manufacturers who extend 

co-op aid. These include: local-level 
tadio copj and radio transcriptions, 
in-store displays, window signs and 
banners, recipe books and other pro- 
motional aids. Since these sales aids 
often represent the creative effort- of 
the top agencies in the nation, their 
use, Barbei - feels, add- to the impact 
ot the lo< al radio < ampaign. 



This kind o| thinking make- liai- 
ber's somewhat unique in grocers air 

advertising. Few supermarket chains 
ti\ to get co-op fund- for air advertis- 
ing; fewei -till make skillful u-e ill 
advertising aids i apart from newspa- 
per mats i provided b\ manufacturers 
through co-op channels. 

Barber's, incidentally, i- so delighted 

with it- cordial CO-op relationship with 

several leading manufacturers that it 
has urged other- to do the same. Re- 

cently, at a Bales meeting at one of the 
Albuquerque Btations, Advertising Di- 
rector Al Brower said thai he fell 
"manj .-mallei grocers could u-e ra- 
dio successfull) if they'd onl) familiar- 
ize themselves with the various co-op 
contracts available." 

Concluded K ABQ's Lowell Christi- 
son, who turned in a valiant job of 
legwork for SPONSOR in preparing Un- 
report: 

"Barbers, based on the Buoceas of 
their present advertising department, 
lakes full responsibilit) for the re-ult- 

shown, as no agenC) is used. Ihev in- 
sist on a 'merchandising' tvpe of adver- 
tising, with everything advertised in 
such a wav that it will create a sale. 
I here seem- to he much to be said for 
having a department located 'on the 
scene, 9 closer to the actual selling prob- 
lem-. 

"The principles of business in the 
Barbers organization ((institute the 
basic philosoph) in their advertising: 
avoid wild claims, offer the best pos- 
sible service at fair price*. Their first 
concern i> qualitv through reliable na- 
tional brands, with price a seconder) 
consideration. 

"I!\ comparison with general condi- 
tion- around the country, Albuquer- 
que's econom) is in a generally good 
condition; with total retail sale? in the 
market onlv W ', to (V < off from 1953 
figures while the nation as a whole is 
experiencing retail sales drops as high 
as 1 1', . 

i Note: Ubuquerque's econom) is 
boosted eonsiderabl) b) the fact that 
it is a center for oil and cattle money, 
tourist trade and the spending area for 
the big payrolls of the Strategic \ir 
Command's Rutland \ir Force Base, 



LEE DORRIS 
SELLS THE BIG 

NEGRO AUDIENCE 

MORN I NC-NOON- AFTERNOON 
ON 

WSOK 

NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE 
1000 WATTS 




102 



SPONSOR 



as well as the Sandia Special Weapons 
Center, testing ground for main nu- 
clear devices. I 

"With a few notable exceptions, the 
small independent grocers have felt 
the leveling-off more forcefully than 
the seven-store Barber's chain. From 
the standpoint of gains, according to 
Barber's, they are not as rapid as last 
y ear but are nevertheless considered 
excellent. 

"With the Albuquerque market ex- 
panding day by day (with an average 
of 60 new families settling every 
week), Barber's sees continued growth 
for their stores and ever-increasing 
volume through a merchandiser's type 
of advertising." * * *• 



SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 67) 

largest and most discriminating adver- 
tisers — he garners prestige and sales 
profits by virtue of filmed programs 
which cost up to $30,000 but are sold 
at prices ranging from $100 to $3,000 
per individual market. He avails him- 
self of the best in talent, production, 
stories and scripts and is assured of 
tremendous audiences. 

In the case of an advertiser who 
buys MPTv's Junior Science series, Dr. 
Gerald Wendt. chief of science educa- 



"This is a time for open minds, for 
curiosity, for imagination, for courage 
and enthusiasm. This is a time for a 
sweeping look around and a bold new 
look ahead. This is a time for deter- 
mined action — and the devil take what 
has been done in the past. If we don't 
do this we're going to be dead pigeons 
because our customers are taking a 
new view, everv dav." 

WALTER C. AYERS 

Executive Vice President 

Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance 

Detroit 



tion for UNESCO, one of the world's 
foremost authorities on the atomic and 
hydrogen bombs, acts as commentator 
for the films in addition to being avail- 
able as a "salesman" of distinction for 
the sponsor of the films. It's prestige 
without peer. 

Talent-ivise, the advertiser who has 
chosen films such as Duffy's Tavern, 
Janet Dean, Registered Nurse and Par- 
is Precinct to sell his product, is get- 
ting network-calibre "names" — estab- 
lished stars who have long been popu- 
lar in various media of show busi- 
ness. Ed "Archie" Gardner. Ella 

26 JULY 1954 



Raines, Louis Jourdan and Claude 

Dauphin have won acclaim through 
the years on radio, stage and screen. 

Production-wise, the network-calibre 
label is stamped on such filmed shows 
as Sheldon I Foreign Intrigue I Rey- 
nolds production of Sherlock Holmes 
which stars Ronald Howard: Charles 
(Search for Tomorrow) living's The 
Heart of Juliet Jones which co-stars 
Cathy McLeod, Lorna Lynn and Cliff 
Hall and Drew Pearson's Washington 
Merry-Co-Round, the award-winning 
weekly news show that is filmed on 
the spot wherever news is in the mak- 
ing. 

Story-wise, the proven popularit) of 
the King Features syndicated adven- 
ture strip. Flash Cordon gives the ad- 
vertiser a pre-sold audience high in 
the millions. The same is true of the 
above-mentioned The Heart of Juliet 
Jones, another King Features syndi- 
cated comic strip favorite. The greatly 
beloved Tim McCoy brings his exciting 
15-minute program of Western stories 
before viewers of every age bracket — 
the dean of American cowboys has as 
much appeal for the grandparents as 
he has for the grandchildren of toda\ 
and the authenticity with which the 
real McCoy stories are presented is a 
natural for the syndicated film adver- 
tiser who desires thrilling sagas of the 
Old West backed up with documented 
facts. 

Script-wise, the cream of the crop of 
writers are responsible for the dialogue 
and action detailed with Duffy's Tav- 
ern I Larry Rhine and Ben Starr ) . Jan- 
et Dean, Registered Nurse ( Victor 
Wolfson, Harry Junkin and James Cav- 
anaughl. The Heart of Juliet Jones 
( Charles Gussman I , Flash Gordon 
I Bruce Elliott. Max Ehrlich and Irv 
Tunick), Sherlock Holmes (Louis 
Morheim, Harold Jack Bloom and 
Sheldon Reynolds), Pan's Precinct 
(Jo Eisinger I and Tim McCoy (Tim 
McCoy). 

Audience-wise, stations will give a 
filmed show good time because a 
worthv show rates it which brings us 
right back to where we came in — 
prestige-wise, and right down the line 
of plus-credits, the filmed program 
pays its own way for both the adver- 
tiser and the station. There's always 
enough commercial time available with 
a filmed show to get in some hard sell- 
ing for products, in addition to includ- 
ing community service promotion to 
the local or regional areas. 




77 



Duane fours 

(Chrmn of the Board and Pres) 
Duane Jones Co., Inc. 



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with a s\ n<li< ated i\ film show. 



Ii\ John It. (ron 

Motional Salen Manager, \l(( It 
Film Divuion 

With t li <• in- 

i eased use of 

syndicated film 

li\ all kind- i>l 
local advertisers, 
the comparative 
\ al in- uf local li\«" 
programing and 
syndicated film 
has become a 
mattei oi livelj discussion. \\ hile 
some sponsors believe that the) can 
best merchandise theii wares with live, 
locall) originated shows, more and 
advertisers are turning to the syndi- 
cated film a* a streamlined, economi- 
cal selling vehicle. There are several 

g I reasons f«>i this development. 

In the firsl place, the price structure 
"I i syndicated film is based on the 
numbei ol television homes in a given 




ATTENTION! 

ADVERTISERS . . . 

AGENCIES . . . 

TV & AM STATION OWNERS 



Station I.' u and A.c 

count Executive with multi million 
dollar \i \\ Vnrk advert 
agency is now available. 

He h i \|.. t ience in T\ 

and Radio, gained from both net 
"inks and agencies. With him 

.hi intimate know ledge oi 
nations ide markets, based on -.nun. 1 
market and broadcast research. 

H< also has a thorough und 

ling ut industry and I' 1 I 
practices, and an unusually wide 
■I acquaintanceship in the 
ng industry. It goes 
t Baying that he has excellent 

If you wish to see this man, just 
write . . . 



JAMES A. MAHONEY 

i rn m .W"\ SOR 
40 East 49th St, New York 17, N.Y. 



market. \n advertise] with limited 
fund- in a -mall market can Bponsoi a 
half-houi program which ma) have 
cosl upwards ol 125,000 to produce — 
for perhaps under $100. The adver- 
n-i't is automaticall) identifying his 
producl with first-rate showmanship, 
and can compete for audiences on the 
the same program level with the big- 
gest national advertiser. Hi- gets net- 
work qualit) production, in other 
word-, at local-level prices. 

Secondly, the advertiser i- virtually 
guaranteed a large and loyal audience 
when he sponsors a good syndicated 

film. American Research Bureau fig- 
ures reveal that good syndicated film 
programs are powerful weapons with 
which local advertisers on non-net- 
work stations can successfullj over- 
come what previousl) had been over- 
whelming network competition. 

\ graphic demonstration is pro- 
vided by a hefore-and-after stud) of 
time-period ratings on three station-: 
\\ FIL-TV. Philadelphia; V70R-TV, 
New York, and KTTV. Los \ngelc-. 
On KTTV, for instance, which is in a 
seven-station market, the before-fihn 
programing lineun saw each of its four 
shows in the 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Satur- 
da) night period in fifth, sixth, second 
and filih positions, respectively. These 
local shows were replaced in recent 
mouth- with four NBC Film Division 
properties- -Life of Riley, Badge 714. 
('.apt u red and Inner Sanctum. The rat- 
ings of these film shows have boosted 
these time periods into first, second 
and third positions, respectively. 

Perhaps the most dramatic evidence 
of a syndicated films effectiveness 
I comes from \\ FIL-TV, which faces 
strong competition from the NBC and 
CBS affiliates. \\ FIL-TV. at the begin- 
ning of this year, threw a hatch of 
syndicated film properties into the 
ring. In one month, the hour-long 
Hopalong Cassidj -how has boosted 
the Monda) through Fridav 5:00-6:00 
p.m. rating Erom 3.7 to 11.1: Danger- 
ous issignment hiked the Monda) 
7:00-7:30 period from 4.3 to 12.2: Vic- 
tory ni Sea tai-ed the Tuesda) 7:00- 
7:30 -lot from k9 to 20.3; Dangerous 
Issignment hiked Wednesday's 10:00* 
10:30 period from 1.2 to 7.6; the half- 
hour Hopalong Cassidj -eric- prac- 
tical!) doubled Thursday's 7:00-7:30 
rating of L6; and Captured boosted 
Friday's 7:00-7:30 p.m. '5.0 rating 

In O.O. 

\\ hile the size ol the audience i- 



one nl the most effective criteria of 
t Ik- Buccess of an advertiser's television 
effort (i.e. the higher the rating and 
the largei the share of audience, the 
lower the cost-per- 1,000 advertising 
impressions), there are plenty of 
success stories which translate these 
high ratings into added revenue and 
increased sale-. 

George (.lav in. of the West-Pacifit 
Agency, Inc., in Seattle, make- the fol- 
lowing report: 

"\\ e-t-l'ai ifn \gencv. Inc.. has 
lived the Life of Riley since the pur- 
chase of NBC's top -how. Riley can 
sell merchandise. After .V '•> years with 
KING-TV, I entered the agency 
business. During those five and a 
half vear-. I saw the screening of sev- 
eral hundred shows. Riley looked like 
a natural to me. I sold it to a local 
jeweler, who w as willing to pav the 
top price of a top -how. The results 
were fabulous, and started almost im- 
mediately. We sold everything from 
golf clubs In t\ -et-. \t the end of 
the 20th week (with the first showing 
of Riley in the market, it reached the 
top 15 shows rating-wise i . the sum- 
mer season was here and the jewelr) 
business dropped to around 2' < of 

total volume. It was decided not to 
buy the eight reruns. 

"The success -Inrv made it eas) I" 
sell to a local grocerv chain with 30 
stores. The first program sold all their 
stores out of 'Lad] Elberta' canned 
peaches, special l»\ the case only. Over 
2.00(1 cases were sold. From there the 
results have been overwhelming. Just 
to highlight a few- these -ales all take 
place in a two-da) buying period, on 
Fridav and Saturday. The tv -how 
runs on lhursdav night. 

One year's normal supplv of Dint] 
Moore'- heel" -lew (500 cases). 

10', additional turkev sales at 
Thanksgn bag. 

7' 2 tons of salmon. 

50,000 lb-, ol pork loins. 
12,000 lbs. of hamburger. 

10.000 lbs. of liver. 

l.ooo do/, i an- of frozen straw- 
berries. 

I.ooo doz. pkgs. of frozen peas. 

"" \t the end of four months. Un- 
chain increased. In the month of Jan- 
uai\ it was 309i over a year ago, and 
the largest month the) had ever had. 

"lu'ley now rates No. 1 in the mar- 
ket. The word has spread and sup- 

pliers are standing in line. 

The advertiser coins into television 



104 



SPONSOR 




for the first time may wonder how to 
choose the most effective kind of sell- 
ing vehicle for his product. The acu- 
men of the syndicator's sales repre- 
sentative, the sales manager of the lo- 
cal station and the tv director of the 
advertisers agency ( if he has one) 
will help to determine the program 
and the hroadcast time to reach exact- 
ly the right audience. 

PERSONALITY TIE-IN 

By Reub Kaufman 
President, Guild Films Co. 

As we scan the 
various types of 
programing avail- 
able to local and 
regional sponsors 
including spot, 
film and local 
live shows, we 
find syndicated 
film providing a 
distinct advantage by enabling the 
sponsor to tie his product to a top, 
national name personality. 

It has become an established axiom 
in television that the impact of a per- 
sonality stimulates increased sales 
through artist-product identification. 

Of course, an advertiser must choose 
a film show with a star personality 
who is welcome into the home and 
wins the affection of the audience. 
That is why Guild Films has a fixed 
policy of developing stars such as Lib- 
erace, Betty White, Joe Palooka and 
Florian ZaBach. 

The local and regional sponsor can 
further exploit the personality in the 
film show and identification with the 
product through supporting advertis- 
ing, especially in merchandising and 
point-of-sale media. 

Every Guild show is designed to do 
just that. Our artists are more than 
entertainers. They are cookie sales- 
men, bank salesmen, gasoline salesmen 
and beer salesmen as well. Their 
friendly faces adorn all types of ads 
and point-of-sale pieces plugging the 
products of local sponsors. 

In addition, special merchandising 
premiums are made available to the 
sponsor of the film show which help 
tie in more intimately with the tv show. 
Probably the best instance is the Lib- 
erace record promotion where spon- 
sors distributed in their own name 
more than 250.000 records in one year 
as sales lures. 



ROUND-UP 

{Continual from page 55) 

crabh wear L! > t ■ \ snil>. pastel shirts 
and use talcum for shim spots on face. 
The booklet has received tremendous 
response from tv guests, says promo- 
tion manager C. W. Dinkins. 



Eldon Campbell, general sales man- 
ager for Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Co., is now an honorary Indian. 
When Campbell went to Oklahoma 
City recently to address that city's Ad- 
vertising Club (on the subject of "Ba- 
dio — the sightless wonder"), he met 




Eldon Campbell (r.) dons feathers, joins tribe 

Indian Chief Jasper Saunkeah of the 
Kiowa tribe at the meeting. Saunkeah 
adorned him with a feathered war bon- 
net, gave him a new name — Dom-Tiye- 
Kiti-Keah — which means Chief White 
Plains, for the city where Campbell 
lives — and made him an honorary 
member of his tribe. 



The blood bank in the Greensboro. 
N. C, area was sadly depleted. 
WFMY-TV responded to the "ur- 
gent" call for donors not only with 
on- and off-the-air promotion, but 
with personal representation at the 
bloodmobile. Over half the station's 
entire staff, including general man- 
ager Gaines Kelley. gave blood: of the 
over-400 pints of blood produced in 
two days, 25 pints came from WFMY- 
TV people. The visit was the most ef- 
fective to date in the area. 



WMTW, new tv station at Mt. Wash- 
ington, N. H., sent out a promotion 
piece recently with a real dollar in each 
as part of the illustration. The dollar 
(easily removable I had brackets drawn 
alongside showing what portion of it 
bought time on \\ Ml \\ as compared 
with the amount needed for other tv 
stations in the area. • • • 



••••••••••••••••••••••••a 



"T 
E 
R 
R 
I 

F 
I 

C 

r 



| hat's what ad 
agencies, advertisers are 
saying about the 

1954 
PROGRAM GUIDE 

It is yours FEEE 
with your subscription 
to SPONSOR 

One year $8 — three years $1 5 



write 



SPONSOR 



40 E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 
••••••••••••a •«•• •••••••• 



26 JULY 1954 



105 



I'M JOE FLOYD... 




I CONSIDER MYSELF 
A HELLUVA SALESMAN! 

. . . and so are Nord and 
Sheeley and the other boys 
on my staff at KELO (radio 
and TV) Sioux Falls. We'll 
go behind a counter to sell 
goods if necessary. Yes, 
we've actually had to do 
that more than once when 
commercials on KELO brought 
more customers into a store 
than the merchant's own 
sales clerks could handle. 
What do you have to sell 
that you'd like extra action 
on? KELO will get it for you 
— in husky sections of 
four states. 



5: 




\Y\NN* 11 
\ward 

ELO 



T 
V 





Channel 11 -Sioux Falls, S. D. 

JOE FLOYD, President 

NBC (TV) PRIMARY 
ABC • CBS • DUMONT 

Ml( (Radio) Affiliate 



Marion llurprr Jr.. president 0) McCann- 
Erichson, announced recently the agency's tv billings 

WOllld be up more than $10 nullum in l954-*55 

lor a total oi out $33 million. Among its t> 
clients are sponsors of two oj the first color programs 
in tv history: Chrysler Corp. will sponsor a series 
of dramas and musical extravaganzas and (testing- 
house will use Besl nf Broadway, both over CBS TV. 

Other new shows the agency is handling include 

Chrysler's It's a Great Life over SBC TI and Derby 
Foods' Disneyland 'alternate weeks), ABC TV. 



Clair ft. MvCollough. president of Steinman 

Stations, chairman of the \ARTB ti hoard. 
was leader in treating an all-industry tele- 
vision sales promotion bureau, l/i (.ollough is one of 
10 members of the all-industry committee uhirh is 
setting up plans tor the new Television Advertising 
Bureau. The TvAH is expected to begin function- 
ing by fall, will ivorl. hand in hand with Ti Audit 
Circulation, a new NARTB-sponsored bureau. Tv 
iudit Circulation will count tv sets county-by-county 
and measure station circulation periodically . 



€ieorge J. /thrums was recently elected vice 

president ol the Block Drug (o.. Jersey City. 
Abrams has been advertising manager of the firm 
since 1917. was formerly associated with National 
Biscuit Co., If hitehall Pharmacol Co. and Ever- 
sharp. He has been a faculty member of the 
Graduate School of Business Administration oj 
\.) .1 . and is chairman ol the newspaper committee 
and the drug and toiletry group of the ANA. This 
\eur he was voted "outstanding \oung adman of 
the year" l>\ Assn. of Advertising Men and U omen. 



Philip H . /.Clllicil. direi tor and chairman of 
the board of l.cnnen & \ewell. retired 30 June, his 
sixty-seventh birthday. Forty L&J\ executives paid 

tribute to l.cnnen at a spe< ial gathering at which 
II. If . Newell, president, presented the agency with 
a portrait o) l.cnnen painted by Ceroid L. Brock- 
hurst. In the presentation Vewell said. "We want 
this portrait ol Phil l.cnnen before us as a constant 
reminder to everyone of his high standards of 
integrity and craftsmanship. A better advertising 
man. and a finer person, never lived." 



106 



SPONSOR 



U Big Show's on toe road 
o Kansas City 



■ ■ I ■ 




The purchase of Midland 

Broadcasting Company, operators 

of KMBC-TV, by the Cook Paint and Varnish 

Company, operators of WHB-TV, has been approved by the 

Federal Communications Commission. The two stations have been 

sharing Channel 9 and the CBS-TV network in Kansas City. The new 

single-station operation has adopted the call letters KMBC-TV. The channel 

will continue to be the full-time CBS-TV basic affiliate in the Heart of America. 



THE BIG TOP IS 
GOING UP! 

The tallest tower in the Heart of 
America is under construction. From 
a height of 1,079 feet, KMBC-TV will 
transmit with full 316,000 watts 
power by late summer. Newest type 
RCA transmitter equipped for color, 
using BIGgest power and TOP-height 
tower, will make KMBC-TV the Big 
Top Station . . . dominating the na- 
tion's 18th largest metropolitan area 
by its top coverage of the rich Kan- 
sas City market. 



ATURING KANSAS CITY'S 
REATEST TALENT! 

The biggest personalities, the top local 
)grams of the two stations are now ex- 
sively on the Heart of America's Big 
Ip Station, KMBC-TV! 





- 



STARRING THE CBS-TV NETWORK! 

Full CBS-TV network programming — the big, top television shows 
of America, carried exclusively on KMBC-TV, basic CBS-TV station. 



f$u4- 



HE "COLOSSAL-COVERAGE" 
RADIO TEAM— KMBC-KFRM! 

Now under "Big Top" direction is also the great radio team, KMBC- 
KFRM, covering the Kansas City and Kansas radio markets as no other 
Kansas City station can. It's CBS Radio, of course, on "The Team!" 

HENRI GOLDENBERG, Chief Engineer 
IX )\ DAI IS 
Vice President 



l()ll\ T. SCHILLING 

I ice Pres. & Gen. Mm . 

DICK SMITH 
Director of Radio 



GEORGE HIGGINS 
I ice Pres. & Sales \fanagt i 

MORI GREINER, Jr. 
Director oj Telex ision 



TOP Station in tne 

KMBC ■ Radio, Kansas City, Missouri - K F R 



earr or Amer 

Radic ie State of Kai. 




What kind of TvAB? 

When the LO-man industry commit- 
tee meets in \\ ashington 5 August to 
blueprint a television advertising bu- 
reau, w hat soi i "1 setup « ill e\ olv e? 

Will it be .1 l\ \l'> serving spot, net- 
work and local tele^ ision under a single 
leadership? This is what the N VRTB 

want-. 

\\ ill it be a I \ \l'> selling and pro- 
moting «>nl\ national — | » « »t and local tv? 
This i- what the Station Reps. Assn. 
and some stations want. 

Will it be a looser) federated T\ IB 
with strong separate units for network. 
spot and local joined 1>\ a hoard repre- 
senting ea< h uint and headed b) a top 
president? This is what man) respon- 
sible people in the industr) want. 

The drive for a television advertis- 
ing bureau, long overdue, was spear- 
headed and ac< elerated l»\ the t\ sta- 



tion reps. The) feel thai national spol 
t\. Btrongl) competitive to net tv. must 
have a bureau of its own. 

W hi' h t\ pe o| I \ \|{ will emerge is 
a Mattel foi the stations to decide. 

sponsor believes in a federated sys- 
tem. It believed in a federated -v-tc-m 
loi N VRTB, and believes thai NARTB 

would he happiei ami healthier toda\ 

had it adopted a federated system for 
t\ and radio as suggested in the spon- 
sor article "Blueprint lor a Federated 
\ \I5" i issue of 6 June 1949, page 28). 

SPONSOR has fought hard for a 

I \ \H. \ federated T\ \B won't come 
easy. I>ul it eertainlv makes sense. 

How fear hurts radio and tv 

When we published the media arti- 
cle showing that irrational factors like 
fear influence media decisions, we said 
it might prove to be "one of the most 
controversial on the subject of media 
ever published." (See sponsor 3 Ma\ 
I'J.vl.i Subsequent events have borne 
this out. 

We have heard from two dozen 
agenc) executives, most of them pres- 
idents. Advertisers have taken sides pro 
and con. Several groups, including the 
American Weekly, asked for permission 
to reprint the article. \n\ adman you 
talk to has an opinion on the subject. 
The reason, as explained in "Are V)l 
afraid? starting page 31, is obvious: 

It strikes deep. 

Onl\ your conscience can help you 
truthfullv answer the question whethei 
you are afraid. Psychologists saj the 



■ normal' person is, and tear influ- 
ences most of hi- acts, even media buy- 
ing. Other- disagree. One adman 
called our original article "danger- 
ous," l>ut the president of a $10 mil- 
lion agenC) admitted that his media 
prejudices had led him to turn media 

evaluation and selection over com- 
pletely to hi- media department. 

Win should the advertiser be care- 
ful of fear and other irrational influ- 
ences in choosing media.'' 

Simplv because the) can force you 
into voting against the two powerful 
hut less tangible and harder-to-use air 
media, according to psychologists like 
Dr. Ernest Dichter, who made the orig- 
inal -tlldv quoted in the 3 Mav i — u<-. 
Not onlv does such thinking perpetuate 
the media status quo, hut it also makes 
the fearful adman hesitant about try- 
ing something new in programing and 
< ommercials. This results in much of 
the imitative use of radio and tv \ ou 
see todav . 

Does fear influence your media 

choice? 

• * * 

125 more radio stations 

\nolher 1 25 radio stations went on 

the air during the year ended 1 Julv. 

Total is now 2,583, including 35 non- 

commercials, as against 2.1">!'> the year 

before. 

In addition Americans bought an- 
other five million radio sets during the 
first six months of this \ear. 

Declining medium? The figures cer- 
tain!) don't support this conclusion. 



Applause 



Good neighbors in Indiana 

In a business where frequently "dog- 
. it -dog" i- the order of the da) . it is 
refreshing to note that friendl) compe- 
tition hasn't vanished. Recentl) one 
pioneei tv station in Indiana decided 
to salute anothei . < ul shows the half- 
page ad which W I l\. Bloomington 
whose general managei is Robert Lem- 
on, bought in all three Indianapolis 
dailies, saluting W I BM-TV, Indianap- 
olis, managed bv llaiiv Bitner Jr. 
Plaque is one awarded bv sponsor to 
all 108 tv pioneers at the N \li I 15 ( Ion- 
vention in < hi< ago in Mav . 



Mllliliimiiilllililiiiiiiillilililiiir ■■ ii , hi ..iii; 



wm i JM-IT 



TV PIONEF.R 



i 




T\ PIONEER 



... In recognition of 5 year, of telecasting 
and vnirr to the people of Indiana. 
And, now, we want lo add our congratulations 
upon the occasion of your achieving maximum 
power and additional tower height 




SARKES TARZIAN, Inc.- Bloomington, Indiana 






108 



SPONSOR 



Now you can reach even more of Indiana with WFBM-TV! 

HIGHER TOWER AND HIGHER POWER 
RAISE NO. OF TV HOMES COVERED 

BY 65.4% 

Our recent powei increase (to 100,0(10 waits ERP) and our new tower 
(1019 ft.) accomplished this: 

• Extended our coverage area to 80 miles 
from Indianapolis in all directions 

• Added 76.1% more households 

• Upped no. of counties covered by 122.2% 

When you consider the number ot tv homes now within reach of your commercial 
on WFBM-TV — more than 660,000 — you must consider Indiana's Number 
One Television Station. Foi further details, check with the Katz Agency. 

WFBM-TV Indianapolis • CBS 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 

Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM k TV, Grand Rapids 













a 






iCIVc^V 2° 



K 



t» 



advertisers use 






RECEIVED 
AUG 13 1954 

NBC GENERAL LIBRARY 

OUN UIL lUmr ANY DOES A COMPLETE JOB 





WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS... 



When you "fill er up" with SUNOCO ... the 
power flowing into your tank is the result of a 
complete job of production. The exacting 
scientific control at SUN's catalytic cracking plants, 
such as the above in Toledo, insures the best in 
petroleum products. Together with modern 
distribution and salesmanship, Sun Oil Company 
stands a leader in the field. 

Havens & Martin, Inc., also gives you power . . . 
"sales" power from Richmond to the rich areas 
throughout Virginia. Creative programming and 
public service on WMBG, WCOD and WTVR has 
built large and loyal audiences. Join the other 
advertisers using the First Stations of Virginia. 

WMBG WCOD WTVR 

First Stations of Virginia 

Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 




lanum power— 100,000 watts at 
'aximum Height — 1049 feet 



TV 



9 AUGUST 1954 



50* per copy* $ 8 per year 



i 



Spot radio: bigger 
than jfou think 



page 31 



, 



THE ALL-MEDIA 
BUYER AT Y&R 



page 34 



Tv Dictionary/Handbook 
for Sponsors: Part i 



i 



page 38 



The radio station 
that works outdoors; 
a picture story 

page 40 



100% air budget he 
Doeskin tissues get 
national distribution 

page 42 



■■ 



How ARBI tests helped 
convert Hale's Dr 
Store to use ol 



:age 44 




t0 otMHC up 

m ... MORE THAN 
125 STORIES HIGH! 



KWTV's new tower — soon to be the world's tallest 
man-made structure — is rushing skyward toward its 
1572 -foot destination. 

And KWTV's new studios — soon to be among the 
largest and best equipped in the Southwest — are also 
near completion. 

Here's a glimpse at the KWTV picture you'll have by 
October I: 

1 572-foot antenna 

316,000 watts — video 

1 58,000 watts— audio 

Oklahoma's largest coverage area* — 

1 ,401 ,400 population; 

$1,326,048,000 retail sales 

More people, more money, more 
TV homes than any other 
Oklahoma station! 

"100 microvolt orea por engineering computations. Population and solos 
figures — 1954 Solos Management Survey of Buying I 

Oklahoma's Number 1 television station is heading 
fast toward new heights of sales-effectiveness. You 
can buy this coverage now for your fall campaigns. 
Ask us for the complete story! 



FRED I. VANCE 
Sales Manager 



EDGAR T. BELL 

Executive Vice-President 



KWTV - CHANNEL 9 

OKLAHOMA CITY 



REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 




Key am stations 
plan coalition 



Radio-tv learning 
print tricks 



Brassieres and 
girdles on air 



Spot radio is 
tonic for S.S.S. 



Phillips mixes 
film and football 



Station breaks 
a plus for RCA 



Long-discussed coalition of top-prestige, high-powered radio stations 
may become reality within 30 days. Group would serve national spot 
advertisers via tape. Dissatisfaction with network radio is behind 
series of meetings stations are holding on subject. Group, now known 
as Quality Stations Association, may run to 25 or 30 stations ; main- 
tain (in addition to individual station reps) own offices in key 
cities; clear choice time. 

-SR- 

Radio and tv are moving rapidly into preserves of printed media. NBC 
TV "Home" show, for example, is taking cue from women's magazines 
by working with department stores. Regular features of show now is 
department store of the week in which cameras pay visit to store. 
Show and sponsors benefit from promotion store does to reciprocate. 

-SR- 

Other respect in which air media are breaking print monopoly is in 
type of clients being attracted. Exquisite Form Brassiere campaign 
this fall in network tv (ABC) and radio (CBS) is b igg e st bra ssiere 
effort in network history. (See profile on Exquisite Form ad manager, 
page 24.) Locally, too, women's undergarments are on air. Article 
this issue tells of Hale's department store in Sacramento and test 
it made of radio, including girdle and brassiere commercials. Note 
particularly girdle copy (page 44) which gives frank description of 
girdle advantages without inhibitions of former years. 

-SR- 

When S.S.S. Co. of Atlanta found sales of its tonic going down despite 
heavy newspaper advertising, firm tested radio. Results were so en- 
couraging firm expanded spot radio use until today it's buying time 
on 305 stations. Sales are up ov e r 300^ since co m pan y st arted radio 
in 1951 ; advertising was seasonal, is now year- 'round. Radio budget 
in 1954 is $500, 000-plus or 80% of total. Firm will put tonic on 



market in tablet form after Labor Day. 
& Weinstein, Atlanta. 

-SR- 



Agency is Day, Harris, Mower 



Phillips Petroleum approach to spot tv gives firm 2 different pro- 
gram formats while preserving advantage of 52-week discounts. 
Phillips airs football in fall, is on air rest of year with film 
show, Ziv's "I Led 3 Lives." Lambert & Feasley, Phillips' agency, is 
seeking to pick up show in 40 markets, now has 28. Show was in 23 
markets for Phillips last year. 

-SR- 

Station breaks on NBC 0&0 stations now give call letters followed by 
line: "A service of RCA." Thus parent company gets benefit of 
millions of trade name impressions weekly, including display of 
trademark in tv breaks. 



SPONSOR. Volume s. No. in. 9 August 1934. Published biweekly b> SPONSOR Publicaiions. Inc.. at Slin Elm Ave.. Baltimore, M<i. Executive, Editorial. Adverti?. 
culation Offices 40 E. 49th St.. New York 17. $S a year In U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 39 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postoffice under Art of 3 March 187t 



REPORT TO SPONSORS lor !> August 1954 



Factbook digests 
tv rates cards 



Radio commercial 
is star-maker 



Show sans scenery 
costs more 



Heinz makes 
tv plunge 



Ingenuity clears 
tv time 



Commercial at 
end weakest 



Buying full hour of Class A time over all 382 commercial tv stations 
on air mid-July would cost $194, 875. That's among facts gleaned from 
fall edition of semiannual Tv Factbook just published by Television 
Digest. Figure amounts to average of 5510 per station for time only, 
not including talent, line and other costs. Factbook digests rate 
cards, gives complete data on technical facilities, ownership and 
executive staffs of all tv stations. 

-SR- 
Measure of impact radio commercial can attain is given by Hunt's 
tomato sauce e.t. ("I love to cook and cook and cook"). Girl who 
sings it got Columbia Records contract a fter ta l ent scout heard com- 
mercial. Girl's picture with her sponsor is on page 33 of this issue 
in story on spot radio. 

-SR- 
Recent Auto-Lite "Suspense" show reached ultimate in "no scenery" tv 
drama (via Cecil & Presbrey). Story called for movie theatre setting 
so cameras were turned loose on studio itself, a former theatre. In- 
genious staging without scenery, however, didn't mean cost saving. 
Show came in over usual budget because total of 6 cameras were used 
for chase scenes up and down stairs of theatre. 

-SR- 

H. J. Heinz Co. has joined majority of major food firms as big-time 
tv spender. It will put half-hour film drama in 33 top tv markets 
on spot basis this fall via Maxon agency. Show is "Studio 57," drama 
packaged by MCA TV. Heinz is also buying 3 announcements weekly in 
NBC TV's "Home" on 52-week basis. Firm's first national tv effort 
represents major portion of budget. Radio may be added. 

-SR- 
Clearing prime spot tv time takes ingenuity of one-armed paperhanger. 
Recent coup scored by buyer netted his client slots next to top eve- 
ning shows in one of biggest markets. Buyer learned strike would 
take b ig local client off air. Within minutes he had local client's 
time tied up for duration — which lasted 2 months. 

-SR- 
Worst spot for commercials is at e d of show. That's conclusion 
Daniel Starch and Staff makes from studies for clients. When viewer 
knows show is over, says Starch, closing commercial drops 50°^ or mor e 
in viewing compared to other commercials on same program. 



Veto national .spot radio ami tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Birdscye Food Co. 

Wh.tc Plains. NY 
Ccncral Foods. NY 
H I. Heinz Co 

Pittsburgh. Pa 

RCA NY 

Rockwood and Co. 

NY 
Rockwood and Co 

NY 
Shell Oil Co NY 



Frozen Meat Pics 



Y&R, NY 



Instant Jcllo Y&R, NY 

Soups, spaghetti Maxon NY 

catsup 'maior prods 

in Heinz 57 line) 

RCA prods and services Kcnyon & Eckhardt. 

NY 

Rockwood Bits and Paris & Peart. NY 

Waters 

Rockwood Bits and Paris & Peart. NY 

Waters 

Shell oil and gasoline | Walter Thompson. 

prods NY 



18-20 radio mkts 



75-80 mkts 
33 mkts 



NBC o&o stns 
45 mkts 
NY Chi 
12 radio mkts 



Radio: live min anncts: 23 Aug: 10-12 

wks 
Tv: film anncts. early Aug; 2 wks 
Tv: "Studio 57." "j-hr drama film: 12 

Sep; 52 wks 

Tv: mm anncts. partic : 2 Aug: 13 wks 
Radio: mm anncts: 27 Sep: 13 wks 
Tv mm anncts. partic. 27 Sep: 13 wks 
Ridio mm anncts: early Aug: 8 wks 



SPONSOR 




One of America's 
Pioneer Radio and 
Television Stations 




WGAL • 33rd year 
WGAL-FM* 7th year 
WGAL-TV* 6th year 

Lancaster, Penna. 



Steinman Station 
Clair McCollough, President 



316,000 WATTS 



Represented by 

M E E 

New York 
Los Angeles 



K E R 

Chicago 
San Francisco 



9 AUGUST 1954 



the magazine r 



advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



Spot radio: hlguer than i/oii think 

In 1953 national spot radio billings hit a healthy $135 million. But many adver- 
tisers still don't fully understand the medium. This report is designed as a guide 
to top management in particular 

II Ml it I VERS: 2. The all-media buyer 

Second in a series explaining the organization of media departments in Top 20 
agencies. Examined in this issue is the all-media buyer system as it operates at 
Young & Rubicam 

Radio van air dresses wttmpum 

Unlike majority of retailers, Phoenix squaw dress shop owner is heavy radio user. 
D.j. show is helping boost sales to $150,000 mark in first year 

Tv Dictionary / Handbook for Sponsors 

Here is first installment of information-packed tv lexicon edited by Herb True, 
advertising professor at University of Notre Dame 



31 



Hi 



37 



38 



Volume 8 Number 16 
9 August 1954 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS 

AGENCY AD LIBS 

49TH & MADISON 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Herbert Leeds 

P. S. 

NEW TV STATIONS 

TOP 20 TV FILM SHOWS 

TV RESULTS 

AGENCY PROFILE, William Mcllvoin 

SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



1 

2. 
2i 

5 

\ 

10 
1' 

14 



Life at a radio station 

WOLF, Syracuse, employees get their sunburns while they work — in a specially 

built outdoor patio. Pictures show staffers enjoying sun during office hours -JO 

100% air hmlget puts over higher-priced Doeskin 

Daytime network tv, radio women's-appeal shows helped facial tissue firm get 

national distribution, boosted sales 34% in just one year -12 

1 department store tests radio 

One of most recent department store converts to radio is Hale's of Sacramento. 
Article explains what store learned from special ARBI newspaper-vs. -radio tests 
in which equal amounts were spent for both media / I 

Some plain facts aboat nhf 

Today more than four out of 10 U.S. tv markets have uhf stations; about 10% 
of all video homes are equipped to receive uhf. Status report gives advertisers, 
agencymen a comprehensive look at uhf's problems, potential iti 

SPONSOR index for first half of 1954 

Articles and departments are indexed here under convenient headings. Extra 

copies of this index are also available to subscribers without charge Hi 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice President & Gen. Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 

Editorial Director: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaf 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad, Joan 8 

Marks, Keith Trantow 

Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 

Editorial Assistant: Karolyn Richman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President and Advertising Director: Re 

erf P. Mendelson 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coop 

(Western Manager), Homer Griffith (Soul 

west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Producti 

Manager), Ted Pyrch, Ed Higgins 

Circulation Department: Evelvn Sati (Su 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morton 

Kahn, Kathleen Murphy 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman I 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



COM I NC 



( anadian Section 

Five-part section on Canada will give latest facts, figures, outlook on Canadian 

radio, television. Highlights of air advertiser activity and list of all Canadian 

radio stations with rates and reps will be included — •» lll(/. 



Published blutekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
romblned wllh TV. Executive . Edltorltl. Circulation. 
Adrertltlng Officei: 49th A Madlion 140 E 4»U) 
New York 17. N. T Telephone: MTrray Hill *■'■ 
Chicago Office: 181 E. Grand At*. Phone »\'v) 

Pallas Offlc*: 2TM Carlltle S! Pl,.w: 
dolph 7381. West I " Sumet Bool< 

phone: Hollywood 4-8069 Prtn 
Office Baltimore 11. SU. Subscript* 

Vnlto<l states $s i year Panada and foreign $». 8lJ 
Print**] In r s \ ill correal 

dance I - N rork IT. N. T. MO 

rrlght 19M SPONSOR PUBLU 
TIONS INC. 



HERE'S 

A MOUTHFUL 

ABOUT RADIO IN ARKANSAS! 




Being the one and only 50,000-watl station 
in Arkansas -and doing a 50,000-watl job 
in every phase of programming KTIIS is 
laturally getting such results as have never oc- 
curred before in the State. 

Witness this letter from George V. Anderson, of 
Radio Sales and Advertising Agency, Topeka : 

"This is your authority to continue the campaign 
for our client, Kinreco Products, on a TF basis. 
We truly believe in giving credit where it is due 
and are happy to say that results have been very 
pleasing in your area due to our schedule on your 
station." 

KTHS gets interference-free daytime coverage with 
more than 3% million people — primary daytime 
coverage of more than a million people! 

Ask your Branham man for the whole KTlls 
story. 



50,000 Watts • . . CBS Radio 

Represented by The Branham Co. 
Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



■>TLJC 
IV I 119 



BROADCASTING FROM 
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 



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I imothfi O'l.earu. Catkins & H olden. New 
York, says that nighttime radio is still a top buy 
particularly for male products. "Many of the 6:00 to 
7:30 p.m. shows arc getting higher ratings than 
early-morning radio," odds Tun. "And, of course, 
there's the factor of money-. A lot of radio stations 
lian- adjusted their nighttime rates down to their 
daytime rate-,, making nighttime a better buy yet." 
He also believes early-evening audiences are more 
receptive to commercials because they're more 
wide awake and more relaxed than in the morning. 



Jean fVifbon. Dowd, Redfield & Johnstone, 
York, feels the Colts Beverages success story in 
Sew York may establish a pattern for other pack 
aged products which want to get a foothold rapidh 

in a ni'U area against entreat lied competition, 

"Through a combination of saturation spot radio in 
the summer and tv in the winter, within less than a 
year Cott attained more recognition than some 

competitors got in a decade" says Jean. "And sales 
are still rising, although other soft drinks have long 
supported by heavier advertising appropriations. 



Huu Stone. \faxon, Vew ) orb, is concerned about 
the loch of reliable market and station information. 
"Market data have u way nl being either incomplet, 
or obsolete." he told SPONSOR. "Its difficult to 
make sound judgments in time buying without 
these basic tools. Alter all. a buyer's choice de- 
pends upon his evaluation of his client's sales and 
distribution problems in a particular market, (such 
ns the type of consumer it is aimed at and under 
what circumstances)- product objectives that h>' 
must correlate with up-to-date market data." 



Joseph T«*ri/. tuples Agency. New York, has 
conclusive prool that radio-tv advertising by one 
member of an industry benefits the entire industry. 
"I'm referring particularly to our European Travel 
cade May 6 campaign,'' Joe told sponsor. "Here > 
a case of a group of low-budget advertisers in the 
travel field getting together and sponsoring a night- 
time radio-ti package deal on a cooperative basis 
Some ol the sponsors were actually directly com. 
petitive like KI.M. Panagra and the C.unard lines 
Hut the entire project promoted travel." 



SPONSOR 




LET 



WHAM 



NEW PERSONALITY FOLDER 

RADIO SELL FOR YOU Write 

for 

it! 



The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y. Basic NBC -50,000 watts -clear channel -1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



9 AUGUST 1954 




SFiep Talk... 

Remembei the old fashioned general store... 
and the friendl) propi ietoi , whose pei sonal 
recommendation meani so much to the mm. ess of 
a product? Today, W'CI'.S Radio's John Henrj 
Faulk (anics on thai tradition. Authentically 
and with easy conviction, he uses tried and 
true old-school selling principles- bulwarked 
by nil the tools of modern merchandising. 

And John Henry is abou( as persuasive a 
talker as they come, f le\ an authoi it\ on 
the language and lore ol our American heritage. 
He developed his skill as a folk humorist while 
teaching at the University of Texas. And nurtured 
it by collecting firsthand samples of folklore 
(on a Rosemvald Fellowship) for the Library of 
Congress. He even lectured on the subject at Yale. 

But then Johnny'U talk anywhere, to every- 
body within earshot. He's mighty convincing 
when he's commercial, too. Especially since his 
friendly on-the-air shop talk (he's one of the top- 
rated personalities among New York's majoi 
stations) is backed up by extensive point-of-sale 
promotion in more than 900 metropolitan stores 
throughout New York's five boroughs, Long 
Island and northern New Jersey! 

John Henry Faulk is just one more reason 
why WCBS Radio has the largest average share 
of audience in New York. II you'd like him to talk 
shop about your product (people'll cat it up!), 
call us for particulars on participations. 

OSGBS RAB1G 

New York • 50,000 -watts ■ 880 kilocycles 

CBS Owned • Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



HE 




The Long 
and the 

Short 

of it- 




KSDO is finl in San Diego . . . 
and that's the long and short of it. 

Surveys, ratings, mail-pull . . . 

any way you look at it, KSDO tops 

every station in this rich 

billion dollar market 

May we give you the long and 
short of it . . . tell you why 

KSDO delivers the moil listeners 
per dollar in San Diego? 




KSDO 



1130 KC 5000 WATTS 

Representatives 

John E. Pearson, Co. New York 

Daren MtGavren San Francisco 

Walt Lake Los Angeles 




by Bob Foreman 

The subject of the pilot film i- worthy of a pica or two on 
these pages since it is of such growing concern to the buyers 
of tv programing and of growing co>t to the producers of 
same. Although there are those entrepreneurs and a few 
stars as well who are still bold enough to use the routine — 
"You know my work, so a sample isn't necessary" — most 
are now quite convinced that a pilot example of what they are 
out to sell is essential even if the proposed series is out of 
Dickens by Martin and Lewis. 

Though some attribute this state of affairs to complete lack 
of imagination on the part of sponsors and/or utter ignorance 
of "show biz'" by agencies, the writer of this tract is of the 
school that both these comments should be answered with a 
loud "nertz." I subscribe to the point of view that the cost 
of 39 television fil ms and 13 reruns in a non-cancellable con- 
tract is of such proportion- that I personally feel a lot more 
secure after having some prima facie evidence of whether 
Mr. Big knows enough to employ folks who can run film 
through the camera in the right direction. Lord know-, this i- 
asking little enough and actually constitutes a bare minimum 
of protection. 

When a supersalesman, out to peddle a no-pilot series, tries 
to counter mv request for this evidence with "The fact" that 
he would be embarrassed to ask a star of the stature of 
Toodles DuFeur (signed exclusively to him) to perform in 
what is really an audition. I am then inclined to make un- 
couth noises with my tongue. I know very well that Miss 
DuFeur. in the feature- -he's made, couldn't speak her own 
name correctly without seven takes and when she had to hum 
Home. Street Home, a multi-thousand-dollar dubbing job was 
required. Realizing that tv can't afford these luxuries. I then 
make a point of saying to Mr. Big. "That is your problem, 
sir — yours and Miss DuFeur's." 

However, if I know the gent well enough to call him Sam 
I might even add that. \u>\ between u-. we're taking enough 
of a chance even alter the pilot i- shot, edited and neatly 
coiled in the can. For. with 38 more -how- to go. experience 
has -how n me how easy it is to miss between Pilot and Film 
No. 2, and there's no telling how much more difficult the pace 
will get as the episodes roll along. Or. as has been perpe- 
trated before, the pilot niav reveal credit- whose name- will 
I Pit-use turn to page 62 l 



10 



SPONSOR 



it's not the 



\ 




REACH 



...it's the 

PULL 



i 



* 



,...- M ...-— — 



*KARK pulls 66 "firsts" among 72 quarter hours reported by 
the March 1954 PULSE Area Study — 11 times as many as all 
other Little Rock stations combined! 



Why holler at the hills with a lot of wasted wattage 
when the folks you want to reach in the Central 
Arkansas market listen most to KARK? Your pros- 
pects tune in the station that offers the best pro- 
gramming. In the Central Arkansas market most 
radio homes keep tuned to 920 — KARK — because 
they prefer KARK's popular local and NBC net- 
work shows, as proved again by PLLSE: the ten 



top evening shows, ten top daytime five-a-week 
shows, nine out of ten top daytime Saturday and 
Sunday shows are all on KARK. It's program pop- 
ularity and proved listenership like this, rather 
than power alone, that attracts customers for you. 

Or to put it another way, it's not the reach — it's 
the PULL! 



Advertise where people listen most, where the cost is low — on 




ARKANSAS 

PREFERRED 

STATION 




©© 



SEE YOUR 
PETRY 
MAN TODAY ^ 




9 AUGUST 1954 



11 



Want to reach 

the people 1 in 
the Dakota area? 



~-Graffon 




aUDAIK 



Buy KXJB-TV 

FARGO — VALLEY CITY, N. DAK. 

Compare! KXJB-TV "l^ 

Sea level L410 ft. 9. r >0 ft. 

Antenna 1085 ft. 433 ft. 

Above sea level 2495 ft. i:*H.'J ft. 

Power 100 KW 65 KW 

Sig. "B" area App. 75 mi App. 52 mi 

Has,- "A" rate $200 hr. $200 hr. 

Channel 4 6 

Channel 4, the atate's choicest channel, 
was allocated to Valley City making it 

possible lor KXJB-TV with maxinium 
power and L085-ft. tower to cover 
Fargo-Moorhead, Grand Forks, Devils 
Lake. Jamestown, Valley < 'it j . Wahpe- 
ton, Breckenridge and Crookaton with 

a good solid Hill microvoll signal. 7 mar- 
ls i i - t..r t hi' price of one. i See mapi. 

MARKET DATA: Over 135,000 urban 

mil rural families within 50 M V M 

line. Average retail Bales per household 

' per vr. I urban and rural . Aver- 

retail Bales i>er household $6794 
rgo i rade area bet ter average 
than auch cities as Boston. Los Angeles, 
I >etroi< . M inneapolis. 

PROGRAM POLICY: Serving the pre- 
dominant Dakota agricultural area 
with true "Farm Programming", 
KXJB-TV is ably assisted by a pro- 

(!r:nii advisory board of the North 

Dakota State Agricultural College 

REPRESENTED BY WEED TELEVISION 
SALES OFFICE: BOX 626, FARGO, N. D. 
PHONE 446-1 
NORTH DAKOTA BDCST. CO., INC. 

KSJB-600 K.C. JAMESTOWN, N. DAK. 
KCJB-910 K.C. MINOT, N. DAK. 
KCJBTV CH. 13 MINOT, N. DAK. 



\LX*JB- tV ^®S VA » B V CITV-FAW0,Mn 

CNANNIl «9. \jjj/ 100,000 »VA.TTS 




m\m 



sponsor invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 



FALL FACTS ISSUE 

\ n I breaker in -i/<\ so was 

your eighth annual Fall Facts issue a 
record breaker in the amount of perti- 
nent, |iiili\ information crammed in 
bighl) readable form into its pages. 

Congratulations to the staff of SPON- 
SOR mi a monumental task. superhk 
done. 

Si i.\ ester I.. Weaver Jr. 
President 

SBC, In,:. Xeu York 



Just received m\ issue of Fall Facts 
and believe me. this i- the finest issue 
in date. It ii>\<Ts aboul everything of 
interesl t<> radio and tv owners and 
managers, plus a down-to-earth discus- 
sion of the various problems facing 
the industry . 

This is a job "better" than well 
done. 

Jack Snydkr 

Maiidiiiiiii Director 

WFBG-ll 

Altoona 



MEDIA SERIES 

Thank you for \our entire series on 
media. Thank you especially for Part 
22. "III. Psychologj of media."' [3 
May 1954, page 34], and your invita- 
tion to express an opinion of Dr. Dich- 
ter's \ iews. 

I agree with Dr. Dichter so whole- 
heartedl) in regard to most of the 
points he has established that I feel it 
would be needless and churlish of me 
to challenge one area, minor in im- 
portance, of disagreement. 

It is m\ good fortune to have no 
feat- regarding my job or in\ future. 
I have countered constant!) the barrage 
of statistics which bombard nrj office 
with personal observations related to 
uhai I have been calling "climate of 
readership." I have insisted thai mere 

aie no absolutes in media appraisal. 

and that an) media appraisal must he 

til. ited to all t\ pi'- o| media, and spe- 
lift' media within each type on a rela- 



tive basis, interrelated with marketing 

information, sales facilities, merchan- 
dising possibilities and the type of cre- 
ative effort to he used. I have refused 
to consider P.I.B. data while making 
a media selection. I have not been 

deeph impressed ever l>\ what the cli- 
ent - competitoi ha- been doing be- 
cause I am certain that man) advertis- 
ers do plaj follow the leader. 

I have been foolhard) enough to 
challenge tin- authenticity of rating 
services for all t\pes of media. It has 
been m\ strong < ontention for man) 
\ears that too man\ admen are trying 
to conceal their lack of talent or in- 
abilit) t<> think clearly through new 
problems with an eagerness to accept 
statistical data as the answers to prob- 
lems which require creative thinking. 

Naturally I am delighted to find 
agreement with my thinking from so 
eminent a source a- Dr. Dichter. 
Thank you again lor publishing this 
article which I think is a valuahle con- 
tribution to the entire advertising pro- 
fession. It should he read h\ everyone 
who really wishes to he an adman in- 
stead of an accountant. 

I iiw usd B. Pope 

Director of Media 

James Thomas Chirurg Co. 

Boston 



• "III. Paj eliologj o 1 media* 1 i* pari of the 
2n-arliele Vll-Medi.t Series, aom bring reprinted 
in lmok form. *lou may reserve a ropy now. 
I'riee w ill In- * I 



We wish to reserve a cop) of \our 
\II-Media Evaluation Series hook. 
Please send a cop\ of the stud) to us 
when ready and hill this corporation. 

1". E. Bensen Jr. 

Advertising Manager 

Canada Dry Ginger He 

\ en ) oi I. 



Would you please -end me the Mi- 
Media Evaluation Stud) when ready? 
Ma) I reserve m) cop) now? 

J \MI s \\ I I HKRF.t.I. 
/ ice President 
Russell M. Seeds Co. 
Chu 

• SPONSOR*! 2t>-\<.trl Mi-Media Ktaluatioti -. 
rlej will be pnbluked in book form ihi- noatft 

I'n. . is SI each. You may rr-rrir your rop> 

do* b] irritim to I" Bart W St., New York IT 



HIGHER MATHEMATICS 

In his stor) on Wildioot "Win 
Wildroot ha- LOO ad budgets," 12 Jul) 

i /'lease turn to jiage 1(> I 



12 



SPONSOR 



THE Daily Double 

in Jackson, Michigan 

SEARS *WKHM 



ROEBUCK and CO. 



A WINNING COMBINATION 



Here's just one example of how WKHM 
achieves big results in the big-dollar Jack- 
son market ! Using WKHM only, Sears ran 
spot announcements featuring washers and 
dryers ... 22 spots for a total cost of 
only $143. This promotion sold over $6000 
worth of advertised items alone. Proof that 
in Jackson, Michigan, WKHM reaches the 
people who buy. 

Needless to say, Sears-Roebuck and Com- 
pany now uses WKHM regularly. Your 
product message can reach this same ready 
audience. Buy WKHM, Jackson . . . valu- 
able corner in Michigan's Golden Triangle. 

represented by Headley-Reed 



A PACKAGE BUY OF THESE THREE 
STRATEGICALLY LOCATED MICHIGAN 
STATIONS OFFERS YOU MAXIMUM 
COVERAGE AT MINIMUM COST. 



Michigan's Golden Triangle 




WKMH 

DEARBORN 

5000 WATTS 
1000 WATTS— NIGHTS 



WKHM 



JACKSON 

1000 WATTS 



WKMF 

FLINT 
1000 WATTS 




high 



U 



ON-AIR" at WBRE-Tl 



New RCA 12.5-kw UHF Amplifier - 

added to RCA's "1 KW UHF"- provides 
a complete RCA 12.5-kw UHF transmitter for WBRE-TV 



Without discarding a single unit 
of its original RCA UHF equipment, 
WBRE-TV has boosted power to 
22 i k\v ERP— in just one step. When 
\\ BRE-TV installs an RCA High- 
Gain UHF Antenna, ERP will go 
up again -to 500 KW. 

WBRE-TV's achievement in 



power boost is another example of 
the way RCA "Matched Equipment 
Design" pays off for UHF stations 
now operating with an RCA 
"1 KW". It assures peak operational 
performance throughout the system 
—and at any power level. It enables 
you to use your existing RCA equip- 
ment as you step up power from 1 



kw to 12.5. It protects your in\< 
ment. 

Are YOU one of the many Ul 
stations now operating an R< 
"1 KW"? If you are, you have cho: 
your basic transmitter wisely. ^ 
can add an RCA 12.5-kw amplil 
and continue to use your 1 KW 
the driver— intact and without mo 
fication. Moreover, you can go 
color — without spending a dii/u 
convert your transmitter. 

Play it safe. Plan your UHF po^ 




saaa ssbq 



QQQQ 




OK FOR COLOR 

Tho TTU-I2A Transmitter, lilt* all RCA TV Tr an 
mifttri new in production, it designed to m 
fully the now FCC Color Standards and to prevl 
high-quality color picture transmission when us. 
with RCA Color Video Input Equipment. 



at rease with an RCA completely 
tched UHF system all the way — 
mi the I KW transmitter to the 
ver light. 



ower UHF 

likes -Bane, Pa. 



3 or help, call your RCA Broadcast 
es Representative. In Canada, 
ite RCA Victor Ltd., Montreal. 



C FOR BULLETIN ... For complete infor- 
on on the RCA 12.5-kw UHF 
smiiter — call your RCA Broad- 
Representative. Ask for the 

illustrated, 1 2-page bro- 
e describing RCA's Hi- 
er UHF transmitter. 




Conventional, small-size, 
RCA 6448 Tetrode used in the RCA 12.5-kw UHF Transmitter. 




RCA-6448 Power Tetrode- 
heart of the TTU- 1 2A, I 2.5-kw 
UHF Transmitter. 

It is used in the kind of circuits 
every station man knows how 
to tune. 

It saves power and tube costs 
(up to $34,000 over a ten- 
year period). 






It's small, fits into easy-to- 
handle cavity assembly. 



It's a standard type — can be 
obtained from your local RCA 
Tube Distributor. 



One type covers the entire 
UHF band, 14-83. 



RCA PIONEERED AND DEVELOPED COMPATIBLE COLOR TELEVISION 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 




ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION 



CAMDEN N 



mi 






•5 -o ° 



L_ 



IT,) sponsor, page 12], Kciili Tran- 

" \i ;in advertising convention in 
White Sulphur Springs a \<-ar ago 
Maurei was asked bj a sponsor re- 
portei after a golf game how much a 
golfer would lose if he losl ever) bet 
at ]<>< a hole, to be doubled on each 
hole. In less than one minute — be- 
tween soaping and showering Maurer 
had it figured out: 'Ovei 813,000.' 
(Exacl figure: 113,107.20.)" 

Do the) pla) 17-hole courses in 
\\ lute Sulphur Springs oi is sponsor 
half right'.' The exacl figure should 
be $26,214.30. . . . 

L. Herschel Graves 

General Manager 
WTAL 
Tallahassee, Fla, 

• The) i»l;t> l8«hole eouraes in \v lute Sulphur 
Springs. Hut Maurer forgot our tiling tthrn 

solving the problem. The figure e! 813,107.20 .. 

tohal the .lutT. i Mould lojte on ju*t tht* 18th hole 
On |hc proce e ding 1™ holes he v.ould have lost 
a total of $13,107.10 which, .i.l.l. . I to the amount 
I..-I on the I Hll. hole, makes 126,214.80. 



RADIO TV DIRECTORY 

I understand that you have offered 
gratis a New York and Chicago Radio/ 
Tv Directory. 

Several requests for the directory 
have been sent to me and so I shall be 
most grateful to you if you will mail 
three copies to my attention. 

JOSEPHINK ZlTELLA 

Librarian 

Foote, Cone <£• fielding 

Chicago 



Just saw a copy of your Radio and 
Tv Directorv of New York and Chi- 
cago. I think that it'd be a very handy- 
thing to have in the old vest pocket, 
and would appreciate ver\ much re- 
ceiving a copy. Thanks very much. 
Don Phillips 
WEW, St. Louis 

• SPONSOR'S 1954 Radio Tv Director) i» avail- 
■hie fr«-.- of charge to subscribers. 



Practically everything SPONSOR does 
i^ very, ver) good and extremel) help- 
ful. 1 thought 1 would let you know 
that the Radio T\ Director) is another 
excellent accomplishment. 

I have onl) two criticisms which I 

believe are in line. One i> that our 

compan) in Chicago is no longer at 

160 but is now at 135 North Michigan, 

m hich i- the Tribune Tow< r. 

Since I read the entire hook cover to 



cover, I noticed that you also rnis- 
Bpelled the '"Hotel Bismarck." 

Thank vou ver) much for the hook 
as it is an excellent service. 

John 1). Stebbin* 
The liolling Co. 
Chicago 



RESULTS BOOKLETS 

We have learned vou are offering 

"Tv Results" 10") \ to new subscribers. 

Since we alread\ subscribe to your 

fine magazine, we were wondering if 

we were eligible to receive this also. 

We would like \er\ much to have a 

copy. 

\I \mi.\ \ li DCE 
Litter, Xeal & Battle 
Atlanta 



Wciuld you find it convenient, feasi- 
ble and reasonable to send us a few 
copies of Tv Results and Radio Re- 
sults'.-' We will appreciate it much. 
Frank M. Devaney 
V .P. & General Manager 
UWIX Broadcasting Co^ 
St. Paul-Minneapolis 

• The I"'.". I edition of Kadio I!, -nil- and Tv 

It. -ult- are iu»t off the proas. I lii . are available 
free to subscriber*: extra ropir.. 81. Ouanlit. 
pi-ire* on r. .[ii. -i 



TV DICTIONARY HANDBOOK 

\- subscribers to SPONSOR we are 
anxious to obtain copies of your pub- 
lications titled, "Tv dictionary/hand- 
hook for sponsors" and the Program 
Guide. Will vou please let me know- 
how this can be done. 

Beatrice Spivack 

Librarian 

Hill & Knoulton 

New York 

• II.. 1954 Program Guide bj availablr free 
to subscriber*. Kxtra copies cost 82 each. The 
1954 "Tv dictionary handbook for spoD.or»" i. 
appearing In SPONSOR starting this issue, see 
page :ik. 



WEEKEND RADIO 

\ few months ago I attended a BAB 
committee meeting in New ^ ork at 
which Eastern and Midwestern sales 
managers present talked about their 
""weekend problem." I was surprised 
then, just as I was surprised to see the 
hig storv in \our June 2!! issue indi- 
cating that a problem even exists 
| ""Weekend radio: are \ ou missing a 

good bet?" page 33]. KBIG always 

i Please turn to /><;;.<• 94) 



16 



SPONSOR 






C ^ £ Q C 

S-tM! 

5 J J J J 





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£ 

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